Megalodon was exceptionally large compared with other sharks

Oct. 5 (UPI) — New analysis of body size among the different genera in the shark order Lamniformes suggests the megatooth shark megalodon was exceptionally massive.

Mature megalodon sharks, which swam the oceans between 15 million and 3.6 million years ago, reached lengths of 50 feet.

For as long as scientists have been finding and studying megalodon fossils, they’ve been aware of the shark’s impressive size, but for the new study, published this week in the journal Historical Biology, researchers wanted to better understand how the species’ size compared with maximum sizes of its many relatives.

Megalodon is a member of a group of sharks known as lamniforms. Most extinct lamniform species are known only by their fossilized teeth, but by analyzing the relationship between teeth and body size among present-day non-planktivorous lamniforms, researchers developed an equation for estimating the body sizes of extinct lamniform shark species.

When researchers estimated

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Body size of the extinct Megalodon indeed off the charts in the shark world — ScienceDaily

A new study shows that the body size of the iconic gigantic or megatooth shark, about 15 meters (50 feet) in length, is indeed anomalously large compared to body sizes of its relatives.

Formally called Otodus megalodon, the fossil shark that lived nearly worldwide roughly 15-3.6 million years ago is receiving a renewed look at the significance of its body size in the shark world, based on a new study appearing in the international journal Historical Biology.

Otodus megalodon is commonly portrayed as a super-sized, monstrous shark, in novels and films such as the 2018 sci-fi thriller “The Meg,” but it is known that the scientifically justifiable maximum possible body size for the species is about 15 meters (50 feet). Nonetheless, it is still an impressively large shark, and the new study illuminates exactly how uniquely gigantic the shark was, according to Kenshu Shimada, a paleobiologist at DePaul University

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Study Shows O. Megalodon Was The Largest Shark To Ever Swim In Our Planet’s Oceans

According to a new study, the megatooth shark Otodus megalodon was the largest shark to ever swim in our planet’s oceans. O. megalodon is an extinct species of shark that lived approximately 23 to 3.6 million years ago. The exact cause of its extinction is still debated, likely a combination of environmental change and competition with smaller shark species played a role.

Despite its fame in pop-culture, surprisingly little is known about the life-appearance of the megalodon. Sharks have a cartilaginous skeleton that will quickly decay after death. Only their hard teeth survive the fossilization process. A recent study published in the journal Scientific Reports discussing the body size of O. megalodon, concluded

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Cannibalism in the womb may have helped make megalodon sharks giants

The largest sharks ever to hunt in Earth’s oceans may have gotten so big thanks to their predatory behavior in the womb, scientists report October 5 in Historical Biology.

The idea emerged from a study that first analyzed the sizes and shapes of modern and ancient shark teeth, using those data to estimate body sizes of the fish. Paleobiologist Kenshu Shimada of DePaul University in Chicago and colleagues focused on an order of sharks called lamniformes, of which only about 15 species still exist today, including fierce, fast great white and mako sharks as well as filter-feeding basking sharks (SN: 8/2/18).

Well over 200 lamniform species existed in the past, some of them quite large, Shimada says. But none is thought to have rivaled Otodus megalodon, commonly called megalodon, which lived between about 23 million and 2.5 million years ago. Determining just how giant these creatures were

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Extinct megalodon confirmed as the biggest fish in the sea

megalodonillustration

This is an illustrated reconstruction of an adult megalodon.


Oliver E. Demuth

Of all the living fish in the sea, we know the whale shark to be the biggest. At up to eight or nine meters (roughly 28 feet), they eclipse all the other sharks alive in the ocean — and females reign supreme in the size stakes. But it certainly wasn’t always the case, as scientists have finally confirmed.

Published in Historical Biology, a study has confirmed that the now-extinct Otodus megalodon, or megatooth shark, once reached up to 15 meters (49 feet) in length — surpassing the present-day whale shark by almost seven meters (22 feet).

Generally portrayed as a gigantic monster of a shark in films like 2018’s The Meg, the real megalodon was a far cry from the 75

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How Cannibalism in the Womb May Have Made Megalodon a Titanic Terror | Science

There’s never been a bigger carnivorous shark than Otodus megalodon. At a maximum body size of 50 feet long, this ancient mako relative was the largest shark ever to chomp its way through the seas. No other shark species, even among its close relatives, grew quite so large. But how did megalodon become so exceptional?

A new study, published today in Historical Biology by DePaul University paleontologist Kenshu Shimada and colleagues, suggests that cannibalism in utero may have helped set up the rise of the largest meat-eating shark of all time. The researchers suggest that a biological connection existed between having large, hungry babies, a metabolism that ran warm and increases in size—with the appetites of baby sharks driving their mothers to eat more and get bigger, which led the babies to get bigger themselves.

Shimada and colleagues focused on the size of existing lamniform sharks, using measurements of

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