Normally an insulator, diamond becomes a metallic conductor when subjected to large strain in a new theoretical model

Normally an insulator, diamond becomes a metallic conductor when subjected to large strain in a new theoretical model
Scanning electron microscope image of a diamond nanoneedle subject to reversible elastic bending deformation. Credit: Amit Banerjee (Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan), Yang Lu (City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong), Ming Dao (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA), and Subra Suresh (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Republic of Singapore)

Long known as the hardest of all natural materials, diamonds are also exceptional thermal conductors and electrical insulators. Now, researchers have discovered a way to tweak tiny needles of diamond in a controlled way to transform their electronic properties, dialing them from insulating, through semiconducting, all the way to highly conductive, or metallic. This can be induced dynamically and reversed at will, with no degradation of the diamond material.


The research, though still at an early proof-of-concept stage, may open up a wide array of potential applications, including new kinds of broadband solar cells, highly efficient LEDs and power electronics, and

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Metallic carbon circuit element enables work on faster, efficient carbon-based transistors — ScienceDaily

Transistors based on carbon rather than silicon could potentially boost computers’ speed and cut their power consumption more than a thousandfold — think of a mobile phone that holds its charge for months — but the set of tools needed to build working carbon circuits has remained incomplete until now.

A team of chemists and physicists at the University of California, Berkeley, has finally created the last tool in the toolbox, a metallic wire made entirely of carbon, setting the stage for a ramp-up in research to build carbon-based transistors and, ultimately, computers.

“Staying within the same material, within the realm of carbon-based materials, is what brings this technology together now,” said Felix Fischer, UC Berkeley professor of chemistry, noting that the ability to make all circuit elements from the same material makes fabrication easier. “That has been one of the key things that has been missing in the big

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