Quik-Pak, Agile Microwave Technology and OMMIC Verify RF-Capable Packaging Solutions for 5G and IoT Semiconductor Devices

Collaboration Targets Packaging for Millimeter-Wave Applications

Quik-Pak Targets 5G, IoT with RF-Capable Packages

Quik-Pak, Agile Microwave Technology, and OMMIC successfully completed electrical RF characterization of OMMIC's millimeter-wave die to 43GHz in Quik-Pak OmPP packages and confirmed 5G-capable frequencies.
Quik-Pak, Agile Microwave Technology, and OMMIC successfully completed electrical RF characterization of OMMIC’s millimeter-wave die to 43GHz in Quik-Pak OmPP packages and confirmed 5G-capable frequencies.
Quik-Pak, Agile Microwave Technology, and OMMIC successfully completed electrical RF characterization of OMMIC’s millimeter-wave die to 43GHz in Quik-Pak OmPP packages and confirmed 5G-capable frequencies.

ESCONDIDO, Calif., Oct. 06, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Quik-Pak, together with Agile Microwave Technology (AgileMwT) and OMMIC SA, today announced its line of JEDEC-compliant air-cavity QFN packages. The Quik-Pak open-molded plastic packages (OmPP®) are RF-capable to data rates of 43GHz, which will help speed availability of semiconductor devices for 5G and internet of things (IoT) millimeter-wave applications. The packages are available now from Quik-Pak as both off-the-shelf and custom offerings.

Each company contributed core technology to the project: Quik-Pak’s OmPP air-cavity open-molded QFN packages, AgileMwT’s interconnect design

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Better detection of microwave radiation will improve thermal imaging, electronic warfare, radio communications — ScienceDaily

Army-funded research developed a new microwave radiation sensor with 100,000 times higher sensitivity than currently available commercial sensors. Researchers said better detection of microwave radiation will enable improved thermal imaging, electronic warfare, radio communications and radar.

Researchers published their study in the peer-reviewed journal Nature. The team includes scientists from Harvard University, The Institute of Photonic Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, and Raytheon BBN Technologies. The Army, in part, funded the work to fabricate this bolometer by exploiting the giant thermal response of graphene to microwave radiation.

“The microwave bolometer developed under this project is so sensitive that it is capable of detecting a single microwave photon, which is the smallest amount of energy in nature,” said Dr. Joe Qiu, program manager for solid-state electronics and electromagnetics, Army Research Office, an element of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory.

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