Turkey-Ukraine work on missile engine could open the door to tech transfer

ANKARA, Turkey — Looming engine technology cooperation between Black Sea neighbors Turkey and Ukraine could turn into a longer-term business deal involving aircraft production and technology transfer, Turkish officials and analysts agree.

“Ukraine has the [engine] technology Turkey needs to develop. Political relations are free from poisoning disputes. And there is an understanding at the official level to develop joint programs,” a senior Turkish procurement official told Defense News.

Ozgur Eksi, a defense expert with Istanbul-based media outlet C4Defence, anticipates engine cooperation would flourish as long as Ukraine is willing to share technology.

“Turkey wants to develop an indigenous engine technology for various aerial platforms it has developed and plans to develop in the future. Technology transfer is key to doing business with Ankara,” Eksi said.

Ukrainian engine-maker SE Ivchenko-Progress is producing the AI-35 engine to power Turkey’s new, indigenous Gezgin missile, according to a representative with a Turkish engine

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India’s Nirbhay cruise missile test fails

NEW DELHI — The flight test of India’s homemade 1000-kilometer-range cruise missile failed Monday following technical problems.

Nirbhay — an intermediate-range subsonic land-attack cruise missile with terrain hugging — is an Indian version of the American Tomahawk and the Russian Club SS-N-27 cruise missiles.

Defense scientists in India said the test failed within 8 minutes of the launch due to technical issues in the engine. They gave no further details.

The Nirbhay missile is currently powered by the Russian Saturn 50MT turbofan engine. Its local development began in 2007 with the Defence Research and Development Organisation.

A senior DRDO scientist said Nirbhay is a stealthy missile capable of delivering different warheads and is capable of loitering and attacking multiple targets.

“The cruise missiles like Tomahawk and Nirbhay (when successful) do not follow a ballistic parabola but are terrain-hugging in their path. Therefore, they are more difficult to detect by conventional

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