Modern tech no better than plain old schedules for commuters — ScienceDaily

Smartphone apps that tell commuters when a bus will arrive at a stop don’t result in less time waiting than reliance on an official bus route schedule, a new study suggests.

In fact, people who followed the suggestions of transit apps to time their arrival for when the bus pulls up to the stop were likely to miss the bus about three-fourths of the time, results showed.

“Following what transit apps tell you about when to leave your home or office for the bus stop is a risky strategy,” said Luyu Liu, lead author of the study and a doctoral student in geography at The Ohio State University.

“The app may tell you the bus will be five minutes late, but drivers can make up time after you start walking, and you end up missing the bus.”

The best choice on average for bus commuters is to refer to the

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$2.3 Billion Microphone Market – Global Forecast to 2025: Escalated Demand for Modern Microphones for Use in Smart Wearable Devices

DUBLIN, Oct. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The “Microphone Market with COVID-19 Impact by Technology (MEMS, Electret, Other), by MEMS Type, by Communication Technology, by Application (Automotive, Consumer Electronics, Industrial, Medical, and Sensing), & by Geography – Global Forecast to 2025” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

The microphone market was valued at USD 1.8 billion in 2019 and is projected to reach USD 2.3 billion by 2025; it is expected to grow at a CAGR of 7.9% from 2020 to 2025.

Traditionally, all major applications such as consumer electronics, automotive, industrial, and medical involved the use of electret microphones (ECMs). However, with time, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology has become quite popular. It is used to create miniaturized integrated devices that combine mechanical and electrical elements.

The size of MEMS devices generally ranges from a few micrometers to millimeters, based on their applications. The fabrication process of MEMS devices

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Would China Ever Build a Modern Battleship?

Key Point: Modern battlewagons could be a real thing. The question is how much they would matter.

S’pose China built a battleship. What would such a sea creature look like, and how would it fare in the bare-knuckles world of naval diplomacy and warfare? This is no mere flight of fancy. No, the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) is not about to embrace a retrograde approach to fleet design, sinking finite resources into majestic but obsolescent ship types.

But it may refresh antiquarian ideas for modern times—as military folk have done throughout history. Martial concepts of old often find new life as technology advances and the strategic environment changes.

This appeared earlier and is being reposted due to reader interest.

Master historian Julian Corbett foresaw the battleship’s demise over a century ago. During the age of sail ships of the line stood at the forefront of naval warfare, brushing aside

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Technology, Innovation and Modern War — Class 4

We just held our fourth sessions of our new national security class Technology, Innovation and Modern War. Joe Felter, Raj Shah and I designed a class to examine the new military systems, operational concepts and doctrines that will emerge from 21st century technologies – Space, Cyber, AI & Machine Learning and Autonomy. Today’s topic was Defense Strategies and Military Plans in an Era of Great Power Competition.

Catch up with the class by reading our summaries of Class 1 here, Class 2 here and Class 3 here.


Our guest speaker was Bridge Colby, former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Strategy and then Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis’ point person for articulating his vision for the National Defense Strategy.

Some of the readings for this fourth class session included: National Security Strategy, 2018 National Defense Strategy, National Military Strategy Summary, The Age of Great-Power Competition, The China Reckoning: How Beijing

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Modern Science Didn’t Appear Until the 17th Century. What Took So Long?

The Scientific Revolution of the 17th century yielded the figure of the modern scientist, single-mindedly dedicated to collecting empirical evidence and testing hypotheses against it. Strevens, who studied mathematics and computer science before turning to philosophy, says that transforming ordinary thinking humans into modern scientists entails “a morally and intellectually violent process.” So much scientific research takes place under conditions of “intellectual confinement” — painstaking, often tedious work that requires attention to minute details, accounting for fractions of an inch and slivers of a degree. Strevens gives the example of a biologist couple who spent every summer since 1973 on the Galápagos, measuring finches; it took them four decades before they had enough data to conclude that they had observed a new species of finch.

Credit…Jessica Herman

This kind of obsessiveness has made modern science enormously productive,

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A future-proof security model for a modern, mobile government — FCW

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A future-proof security model for a modern, mobile government

 

The shift to telework has required many federal agencies to consider new security approaches to fill in the gaps between traditional network-centric security that is not built to scale to a dynamic telework environment, the IT network architecture, and various cloud architectures.

To address these complexity and cybersecurity issues, agencies are turning to policies including CISA’s Trusted Internet Connection (TIC) 3.0 that provide guidance on reducing risks and enabling secure connections to government networks.

TIC 3.0 opens the door for modern, hybrid cloud environments, and provides agencies with greater flexibility. Rather than focusing on a physical network perimeter that no longer exists, the guidance recommends considering each zone within an agency environment to ensure baseline security across dispersed networks. As agencies continue to support a remote and distributed workforce, this security approach will be critically important.

In

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Army triples use of OTAs as it pushes for modern technology

Written by

Jackson Barnett

In the last three years, the Army has more than tripled its use of other transaction agreements (OTAs) — contracts that circumvent typical acquisition regulations to promote rapid, innovative contracting — as it prototypes and tries to field new technology, according to a new Government Accountability Office study.

In 2017, the Army obligated $1.59 billion in other transactions, which rose to $4.8 in 2019, according to the audit. The vast majority of those OTAs were issued for technology prototypes, the analysis shows.

OTAs are a relatively new method for the Defense Department to make quick purchases. The Army has prioritized use of Other Transaction Authority as it stands up Army Futures Command, which is focused on fielding emerging technology.

But the Army still has a lot to learn about how effective the novel contracts are, the GAO said. The watchdog group

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Tachyum CEO Talks About How Technology is Changing Modern Warfare at GLOBSEC 2020 Bratislava Forum

Dr. Radoslav Danilak, co-founder and CEO of Tachyum Inc., has been invited to speak to an audience of influential heads of state, business leaders, innovators and industry experts about the role of technology in warfare at the GLOBSEC 2020 Bratislava Forum October 7-8.

Over the past two decades, GLOBSEC Bratislava Forum has established itself as the leading platform in the Central Eastern Europe region and one of the top strategic conferences globally. The Forum facilitates free exchange of ideas and provides a meeting place for stakeholders from all sectors of society to actively shape the future for generations to come. The two-day GLOBSEC 2020 Bratislava Forum, under the theme “Let’s Heal the World Together,” will provide a platform for discussing what shape the rebuilding of the post-pandemic world could have.

Danilak has nearly 30 years of industry experience and more than 100 patents designing state-of-the-art processing systems. In 2016,

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Modern Warfare’ And ‘Warzone’ In Season 6

Season 6 of Modern Warfare and Warzone is almost upon us. You have hours—not days—to wrap up the Season 5 Battle Pass.

Season 6 could be the last season for Call Of Duty: Modern Warfare before the launch of Call Of Duty: Black Ops, but Warzone will keep on going strong with a new Black Ops coat of paint. It’s also possible that we’ll get one more Modern Warfare season and that Cold War’s first season won’t start until weeks after the game’s launch, a scenario that I would prefer. Then again, I still think Cold War should have been pushed back to 2021.

We shall see.

For now,

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Modern Warfare’s PS4 Exclusive Mode Will Come To Xbox One And PC Soon

After nearly a year of exclusivity on PlayStation 4, Call of Duty: Modern Warfare’s Survival mode in Spec Ops is headed to Xbox One and PC very soon.

Xbox One and PC players can access Survival mode from October 1, Infinity Ward’s senior communications manager announced on Twitter.

Xbox One and PC users have had access to the Spec Ops mode for Modern Warfare for launch, but Sony paid Activision to keep the Survival mode exclusive to PS4 for nearly a year.

Survival is a Horde-style cooperative mode where teams of up to four players fight against waves of increasingly difficult AI enemies across multiple maps.

Before Survival comes to Xbox One and PC, Infinity Ward will introduce Season 6 for Modern Warfare and the battle royale game Warzone. The free expansion adds new multiplayer maps, introduces a subway system to Warzone’s battle royale map, and includes new Operators.

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