Sea star’s ability to clone itself may empower this mystery globetrotter — ScienceDaily

For decades, biologists have captured tiny sea star larvae in their nets that did not match the adults of any known species. A Smithsonian team recently discovered what these larvae grow up to be and how a special superpower may help them move around the world. Their results are published online in the Biological Bulletin.

“Thirty years ago, people noticed that these asteroid starfish larvae could clone themselves, and they wondered what the adult form was,” said staff scientist Rachel Collin at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI). “They assumed that because the larvae were in the Caribbean the adults must also be from the Caribbean.”

Scientists monitor larvae because the larvae can be more sensitive to physical conditions than the adults and larval dispersal has a large influence on the distribution of adult fishes and invertebrates. Collin’s team uses a technique called DNA barcoding to identify plankton. They

Read More
Read More

The Mystery And Science Behind The Law Of Attraction

Transformational coach leveraging science & ancient wisdom to help people manifest their greatness. Blue Dot Transform Consulting

I fondly remember my graduation day, which was on the 25th of April. The master of ceremonies was going to announce the name of the student who bagged the title of best all-rounder for the postgraduate class of 2010. The award also entailed a cash prize worth $1,500.

I was hopeful of winning the title as I had worked tirelessly and visualized the entire scenario several times. “Mental rehearsal,” as scientists call it, is something that performers do quite often before a performance. Here, I was not going to perform something, but I was strongly intending to create an event that my mind had conceived. 

Lo and behold, my crazy thought manifested. As I went up to the stage and received the award, I was reliving each and every moment that I

Read More
Read More

NASA expert identifies mystery object once thought an asteroid

The jig may be up for an “asteroid” that’s expected to get nabbed by Earth’s gravity and become a mini moon next month. Instead of a cosmic rock, the newly discovered object appears to be an old rocket from a failed moon-landing mission 54 years ago that’s finally making its way back home, according to NASA’s leading asteroid expert. Observations should help nail its identity.

“I’m pretty jazzed about this,” Paul Chodas told The Associated Press. “It’s been a hobby of mine to find one of these and draw such a link, and I’ve been doing it for decades now.”

Chodas speculates that asteroid 2020 SO, as it is formally known, is actually the Centaur upper rocket stage that successfully propelled NASA’s Surveyor 2 lander to the moon in 1966 before it was discarded. The lander ended up crashing into the moon after one of its thrusters failed to ignite

Read More
Read More

Fake asteroid? NASA expert IDs mystery object as old rocket

title=

This Sept. 20, 1966 photo provided by the San Diego Air and Space Museum shows an Atlas Centaur 7 rocket on the launchpad at Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA’s leading asteroid expert, Paul Chodas, speculates that asteroid 2020 SO, as it is formally known, is actually a Centaur upper rocket stage that propelled NASA’s Surveyor 2 lander to the moon in 1966 before it was discarded.

AP

The jig may be up for an “asteroid” that’s expected to get nabbed by Earth’s gravity and become a mini moon next month.

Instead of a cosmic rock, the newly discovered object appears to be an old rocket from a failed moon-landing mission 54 years ago that’s finally making its way back home, according to NASA’s leading asteroid expert. Observations should help nail its identity.

“I’m pretty jazzed about this,” Paul Chodas told The Associated Press. “It’s been a hobby of

Read More
Read More

Mystery Deepens Around Unmanned Spy Boat Washed Up In Scotland

Last week a small unmanned vessel washed up on the rocky Scottish Isle of Tiree, about a hundred miles from the UK’s nuclear submarine base as Faslane.  It was identified as a Wave Glider, a type made by U.S. company Liquid Robotics, capable of traveling thousands of miles and used by both the U.S. Navy and Britain’s Royal Navy as well as other government agencies and scientific researchers. The local Coastguard have been unable to trace the owner so far, but the craft’s configuration suggests it was on a secret mission.

Contacted by Forbes, Britain’s Ministry of Defence were at first uncertain, but later provided a definite statement.

“The vessel is not ours,” said a spokesman.

They could not provide any information

Read More
Read More

Among Us, a murder mystery set in space, is the latest multimillion dollar craze in video games

As people stay at home across the world, their latest favorite pastime is a 2018 murder mystery game set in space called Among Us.





© InnerSloth


The game’s exponential popularity drove its developers to announce on Thursday they were canceling a sequel to the game, to better focus on growing the existing version. The game reached over a million players on September 3 and had grown to over 3.5 million concurrent users worldwide by Friday.

Loading...

Load Error

“We canceled the sequel because we saw the opportunity to give back to the players a little bit faster than creating a new, better version,” Forest Willard, a developer at InnerSloth, which makes Among Us, told CNN Business. “It will be more work in the long run, but we’re excited for players to update the game, and suddenly there’s a brand new feature or map that unlocks new experiences.”

Among Us is based

Read More
Read More

Mystery of giant proton pump solved

Mystery of giant proton pump solved
Complex I in the membrane, with resolved water molecules shown as red spheres, Quinone in black and NADH in gray. Credit: IST Austria

Mitochondria are the powerhouses of our cells, generating energy that supports life. A giant molecular proton pump, called complex I, is crucial: It sets in motion a chain of reactions, creating a proton gradient that powers the generation of ATP, the cell’s fuel. Despite complex I’s central role, the mechanism by which it transports protons across the membrane has so far been unknown. Now, Leonid Sazanov and his group at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have solved the mystery of how complex I works: Conformational changes in the protein combined with electrostatic waves move protons into the mitochondrial matrix. This is the result of a study published today in Science.


Complex I is the first enzyme in the respiratory chain, a series

Read More
Read More

Whale beaching: An enduring mystery

By Paulina Duran

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Rescuers are trying to free a pod of long-finned pilot whales stranded off the Australian island of Tasmania. Around 470 whales are in the pod, more than half of which have already died, in one of the world’s biggest beachings.

WHY DO WHALES BEACH THEMSELVES?

It’s the question that has puzzled marine biologists for years, and continues to do so. Mass whale strandings have occurred throughout recorded modern history, and likely earlier.

“Strandings around the world are complete mysteries,” said Vanessa Pirotta, a Sydney-based wildlife scientist.

While scientists don’t know the exact reason, they do know that whales – and dolphins, which are also prone to mass beaching – are very sociable animals. They travel together in pods, often following a leader, and are known to gather around injured or distressed whales.

“There are many different factors that can cause a stranding,” said Australian

Read More
Read More