Prop 24, the California Privacy Rights Act Receives Support From 77% Of Likely California Voters

Prop 24, the California Privacy Rights Act Receives Support From 77% Of Likely California Voters

PR Newswire

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Oct. 6, 2020

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Oct. 6, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Today the YES on Prop 24 campaign released polling results from Goodwin Simon Strategic Research showing that voters continue to overwhelmingly support Prop 24, the California Privacy Rights Act on the November ballot, with 77% of likely voters saying they will vote YES on the ballot measure.

Yes on Privacy, Yes on Prop 24 (PRNewsfoto/Californians for Consumer Priva)
Yes on Privacy, Yes on Prop 24 (PRNewsfoto/Californians for Consumer Priva)

Voters are demanding privacy rights and that’s exactly what we’re giving them in Prop 24- that’s why it has 77% support.

Even more telling is that despite negative campaigning by the opposition, only 11% of voters oppose the measure – the same number as when the last poll was taken in July.

“It’s crystal clear that voters are demanding privacy rights, and

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No on Prop. 22. It’s the wrong solution for Uber drivers and the gig economy

Passengers connect with drivers at the ride-hailing lot at LAX on Aug. 20. <span class="copyright">(Los Angeles Times)</span>
Passengers connect with drivers at the ride-hailing lot at LAX on Aug. 20. (Los Angeles Times)

Proposition 22, which would classify drivers for app-based services such as Uber and Lyft as independent contractors but guarantee them certain benefits, is an ink-blot test.

If you think these companies are predators that exploit workers and compete unfairly, you’ll see the measure as yet another effort by the tech industry to circumvent the rules by which responsible corporate citizens play. If you think the apps provide workers an easy means to make extra money and consumers an affordable alternative to taxis, you’ll see Proposition 22 as a way to hold onto a service you value.

In reality, the measure is a fix designed by Uber and its counterparts for a problem the California Supreme Court created when it issued its Dynamex decision in 2018, making it harder for employers to classify workers as

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