Yelp flags restaurants accused of racism, raising concerns

Now Yelp, the platform that has more than 200 million crowdsourced reviews, announced Thursday that it will start flagging businesses that have been accused of racism, a new practice that some critics say could be abused by users.

In a blog post by Noorie Malik, the vice president of user operations, Yelp announced it will affix a “Business Accused of Racist Behavior” alert on accounts only when there is “resounding evidence of egregious, racist actions from a business owner or employee, such as using overtly racist slurs or symbols.” The alert will always be accompanied by a link to a news story from a credible media outlet, Malik wrote.

“As the nation reckons with issues of systemic racism, we’ve seen in the last few months that there is a clear need to warn consumers about businesses associated with egregious, racially-charged actions to help people make more informed spending decisions,” Malik

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New Yelp Policy Will Flag Businesses Accused of Racism

Yelp  (YELP) – Get Report rolled out a new feature Friday that will alert users when an establishment has been associated with what the review site called “egregious, racially charged actions.” 

The San Francisco company’s site enables users to rank and comment about businesses.

“As the nation reckons with issues of systemic racism, we’ve seen in the last few months that there is a clear need to warn consumers about businesses associated with egregious, racially charged actions to help people make more informed spending decisions,” the company said in a statement. 

A banner with a red exclamation point and a tile of “Business Accused of Racist Behavior” will appear under a business where “someone associated with this business was accused of racist behavior.”

The banner also will say whether the racist behavior resulted in an influx of people posting their views to a business’s Yelp page. Those negative

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Geek of the Week: Artist Chanee Choi’s 3D video game ‘Pandemic’ looks at racism during COVID-19

Chanee Choi performs in another of her works, called “Polaris,” a multimedia installation and performance. (Photo courtesy of Chanee Choi)

Chanee Choi’s “Pandemic” is a video game and it is art. And the “art game” is not an escape from reality as we know it right now.

A Ph.D. candidate in art and technology in the University of Washington’s Digital Arts and Experimental Media (DXARTS) department, Choi is a multidisciplinary interactive artist. Her latest project is a first-person 3D video game in which the player is the coronavirus, moving through a virtual environment.

Chanee Choi.

Our latest Geek of the Week, who is originally from South Korea, took on “Pandemic” to bring awareness to incidents of discrimination, xenophobia, racism, and violence against Asian Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic. She hopes her game conveys a sense of what it’s like to be a minority in America.

“I think games are capable

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Yelp placing alerts on business pages accused of racism

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As people look for tips on where to spend their money, Yelp created a consumer alert warning users about businesses accused of racist behavior.

TNS

If you’re browsing through Yelp reviews, you might come across a new consumer alert, warning you that a business has been “accused of racist behavior.”

“Recently, someone associated with this business was accused of racist behavior, resulting in an influx of people posting their views to this page,” the warning says.

There has been a substantial increase in the number of reviews mentioning Black-owned businesses, Yelp said in a news release Thursday. This summer, Yelp saw a 617% rise in such reviews compared with last year.

“While searches for Black-owned businesses surged on Yelp, so did the volume of reviews warning users of racist behavior at businesses,” the company said.

In the interest of the company’s “zero tolerance policy to racism,” it will

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Militia groups like Oath Keepers pledge to protect property amid charges of racism

More than 100 protesters — some wearing all black and carrying pistols — marched up to the approximately 20 people who had gathered Thursday evening awaiting instructions from the Oath Keepers, a heavily armed civilian group that has guarded private businesses during racial justice demonstrations this year.

The man leading the protesters, Chris Will, 34, criticized the people in fatigues for showing up to defend property but not the life of the 26-year-old Black woman who was killed by Louisville police in her apartment in March.

“Why didn’t every single one of you motherf—ers put this s— on to come help Breonna Taylor when they killed her?” Will asked the armed men, pointing at their body armor.

Oath Keepers leaders urged members not to respond; escalating tensions with demonstrators would only feed public perception that they were the problem, not the solution.

Oath Keepers is one of numerous vigilante groups

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Black scientists call out racism in the field and counter it

The recent episode of a White woman calling the police on a Black birder in New York’s Central Park shocked many people. But for Black environmental scientists, worrying about whether they are likely to be harassed or asked to justify their presence while doing fieldwork is a familiar concern.

Tanisha Williams, a botanist at Bucknell University, knows which plants she’s looking for. But after being questioned by strangers in public parks, Williams, who is Black, has started carrying her field guides with her.

“I’ve been quizzed by random strangers,” she said. “Now I bring my wildflower books and botanical field guides, trying to look like a scientist. It’s for other people. I wouldn’t otherwise lug these books.”

Overt harassment and subtle intimidation during fieldwork compound the discrimination that Black scientists and those from other underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds already feel in academic settings.

Now researchers in the environmental sciences

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During pandemic, racism puts additional stress on Asian Americans — ScienceDaily

Many people are feeling anxious during these uncertain times as they navigate the risks associated with COVID-19 and experience the tension from physical distancing or isolation for what can seem like an eternity. But people of Asian ancestry face yet another set of challenges posed by racism and xenophobia which has soared during the COVID-19 pandemic amidst rumors and blame placed on China.

This pandemic-driven rise in anti-Asian racism is so pronounced, that in a commentary recently published in the American Journal of Public Health, psychiatrist Justin A. Chen, MD, MPH, and his coauthors have described it as a “secondary contagion” threatening this population.

Chen is an investigator in the Department of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. In addition, he serves as executive director and co-founder of the MGH Center for Cross Cultural Student Emotional Wellness. He is lead author

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