NASA astronaut set to launch on Russian rocket as US transitions to private spacecraft

A new crew of three astronauts are launching to the International Space Station late tonight, blasting off on a Russian Soyuz rocket out of Kazakhstan. The trio are heading to the station about a month ahead of SpaceX’s next crewed Dragon launch, which will bring another set of four astronauts aboard the ISS in mid-November.

Heading up on this Soyuz flight are two Russian cosmonauts — Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov — and NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, on her second trip to space. The trio will join three crew members who have been living on the ISS since April: Russian cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner and NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy. However, their living arrangement won’t last long. Cassidy and his cosmonaut crew mates are slated to head back to Earth on October 21st, riding inside the Soyuz capsule that brought them to the space station.

Just a few weeks

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Sorry, SpaceX. Watch This Week As NASA Pays $90 Million To Launch U.S. Astronaut On A Russian Rocket

U.S. astronauts now fly to the International Space Station (ISS) from American soil, right?

So why is a NASA astronaut about to blast-off to the ISS from Russia at a cost of over $90 million?

Despite the success of “Launch America” back on May 30, 2020 when NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley journeyed to and from the ISS in SpaceX hardware during the historic SpaceX Crew Demo-2 mission, NASA astronaut Kate Rubin will this week leave Earth from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

As I reported back in June, it’s the final part of an existing contract between NASA and the Russian space agency to send a US astronaut to the ISS aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft.

When is the next

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Head of Russian space program calls for more international cooperation in NASA’s Moon plans

The head of Russia’s space program said today that NASA’s plans to send people back to the Moon are “too US-centric” for Russia to participate. He has been critical of the program in the past and now says that Russia would only be open to participating if the Moon plans were more focused on international cooperation.

“The most important thing here would be to base this program on the principles of international cooperation that we’ve all used” to fly the ISS, Dmitry Rogozin, the director-general of Roscosmos, said through a translator during a virtual press conference at the International Astronautical Congress. He added: “If we could get back to considering making these principles as the foundation of the program, then Roscosmos could also consider its participation.”

Rogozin has made it clear that he is not a fan of NASA’s Moon program, an initiative called Artemis that aims to send the

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Russian smartphone market up 5% to 22.5 mln units in first nine months of 2020

The Russian smartphone market grew by 5 percent year-on-year in the first nine months of 2020 to 22.5 million devices, according to data from the operator MTS. Revenues increased by 11 percent to RUB 380 billion, and the average retail  rate of a smartphone grew by 6 percent, to RUB 16,930.

Significant growth in online sales was registered. Online sales jumped by 60 percent in units and were up by 84 percent in value. The average price of a smartphone sold online amounted to RUB 19,700, up by 15 percent year-on-year.

Samsung led the market in volume with a 26 percent share. Honor followed with 24 percent, while Xiaomi, Apple and Huawei took 18 percent, 10 percent and 7 percent, respectively.

Apple led by revenues with a 33 percent share, and Samsung followed with 27 percent. The indicators of Honor, Xiaomi and Huawei were 16 percent, 13 percent and 5

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Russian state hackers appear to have breached a federal agency



a laptop computer sitting on top of a table: BERLIN, GERMANY - MARCH 01: In this photo illustration artwork found on the Internet showing Fancy Bear is seen on the computer of the photographer during a session in the plenary hall of the Bundestag, the German parliament, on March 1, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. German authorities announced yesterday that administrative computers of the German government, including those of government ministries and parliament, had been infiltrated with malware. Authorities said they suspect the Russian hacker group APT28, also known as Fancy Bear. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)


BERLIN, GERMANY – MARCH 01: In this photo illustration artwork found on the Internet showing Fancy Bear is seen on the computer of the photographer during a session in the plenary hall of the Bundestag, the German parliament, on March 1, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. German authorities announced yesterday that administrative computers of the German government, including those of government ministries and parliament, had been infiltrated with malware. Authorities said they suspect the Russian hacker group APT28, also known as Fancy Bear. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Russia’s 2020 hacking campaigns might have included a successful data breach at the US government. In the wake of a CISA notice warning of a cyberattack on an unnamed federal agency’s network, Wired and security company Dragos have obtained evidence suggesting Russia’s state-backed APT28 group, better known as Fancy Bear, was behind the hack.

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The FBI reportedly sent alerts to some

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Maps From Free-To-Play Russian Game Halo Online Could Come To The Master Chief Collection

In 2015, Microsoft worked with Saber Interactive on a free-to-play Halo game for Russia called Halo Online. It was short-lived, however, as Microsoft canceled it before it even left beta.

The game may get a new lease on life, as Microsoft has teased that maps from Halo Online could be incorporated into Halo: The Master Chief Collection in the future.

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Design director Max Szlagor said in a blog post that included among the many, many other new features that are being discussed for MCC are Halo Online maps. “Is there an opportunity to bring over some of the Halo Online maps? There’s a lot of options out there and it’s all dependent on what’s feasible and everything takes time and has to be measured against the bug list, backlog, and feature priorities,” Szlagor said. “All in all, we are definitely looking towards more goodness and continuing with more seasons.”

The

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Russian operation masqueraded as right-wing news site

The Russian group accused of meddling in the 2016 U.S. election has posed as an independent news outlet to target right-wing social media users ahead of this year’s vote, two people familiar with an FBI probe into the activity told Reuters.

The latest operation centered around a pseudo media organization called the Newsroom for American and European Based Citizens (NAEBC), which was run by people associated with the St. Petersburg-based Internet Research Agency, the sources said.

U.S. prosecutors say the agency played a key role in Russian efforts to sway the 2016 election in favor of President Donald Trump, and Facebook and Twitter exposed a fake left-wing media outlet in September which they said was run by people connected to the organization.

NAEBC and its activity, which have not been previously reported, now show that Russian attempts to influence U.S. voters ahead of the 2020 election have targeted both sides

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Russian scientist detained for allegedly passing technology to China – reports

MOSCOW (Reuters) – A Russian scientist has been detained in Siberia for allegedly passing technology to China, Russian media reported on Thursday.

Alexander Lukanin, a 64-year-old scientist from the Siberian city of Tomsk, was detained on Tuesday after returning from China were he had been working at a local university, according to MBKh Media, a news outlet founded by Kremlin critic Mikhail Khodorkovsky.

Lukanin’s apartment was also raided by the FSB security service, MBKh Media reported, citing one of the scientist’s friends.

A message sent by Reuters on Thursday to Lukanin’s email address went unanswered. There was no immediate comment from the Russian or Chinese authorities.

Under Russian law, illegally transferring technology to a foreign country can lead to up to three years in prison.

Interfax news agency quoted a source as saying Lukanin had been detained for allegedly passing technology to China but that he was not being accused

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Russian scientist detained for allegedly passing technology to China: reports

MOSCOW (Reuters) – A Russian scientist has been detained in Siberia for allegedly passing technology to China, Russian media reported on Thursday.

Alexander Lukanin, a 64-year-old scientist from the Siberian city of Tomsk, was detained on Tuesday after returning from China were he had been working at a local university, according to MBKh Media, a news outlet founded by Kremlin critic Mikhail Khodorkovsky.

Lukanin’s apartment was also raided by the FSB security service, MBKh Media reported, citing one of the scientist’s friends.

A message sent by Reuters on Thursday to Lukanin’s email address went unanswered. There was no immediate comment from the Russian or Chinese authorities.

Under Russian law, illegally transferring technology to a foreign country can lead to up to three years in prison.

Interfax news agency quoted a source as saying Lukanin had been detained for allegedly passing technology to China but that he was not being accused

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Vexing Space Station Air Leak Traced to Russian Module After False Alarm

The International Space Station.

The International Space Station.
Image: NASA

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station sprung to action late Monday night following concerns that a persistent air leak had grown in size. It turned out to be a false alarm, but during the event, the crew managed to trace the source of the leak to a Russian service module.

NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and Roscosmos cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner were awakened by flight controllers late Monday and told to scour the Russian side of the International Space Station in an attempt to pinpoint the source of an air leak that appeared to be growing in size. Thankfully, the flight controllers were wrong, as they mistook a temporary temperature change aboard the ISS for a growing leak, according to NASA. The overall rate of the air leak, which was detected a year ago, is the same as it was before.

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