CNN launches new series ‘Saved by the Future’ with leading names in science and technology exploring the innovations that will shape our future | Nachricht

HONG KONG, Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — This month, CNN launches ‘Saved by the Future’, a brand-new cross-platform series in which some of the biggest names in science and technology spotlight breakthrough innovations in mobility, automation, energy, sustainability and artificial intelligence that could transform our lives in decades to come.

In the first of three 30-minute shows, host Nicki Shieldsguides conversations with Bill NyeFabien Cousteau and Kathy Sullivan, who transport us to a world of future possibilities that once seemed like mere science fiction, in everything from mobility in space to electric drones that can predict the weather.

Shields first speaks with TV Star “The Science Guy”, climate change advocate and social media sensation Bill Nye about the future of space exploration. Nye is CEO of the Planetary Society, which successfully launched its LightSail 2 spacecraft in 2019. The spacecraft is powered by solar winds

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This new Gmail update could have saved your smartphone battery

UPDATE: The app has now been pulled from the Play Store for all devices except those running Android Go, with users now confronted with a message saying, “Your device isn’t compatible with this version.”



Gmail


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Gmail

Using Gmail on your phone is set to be a lot kinder on battery life and performance thanks to a new launch from Google.

The company has quietly released Gmail Go, a low-scale version of its popular email service, for all Android users to download on the Play Store now.

The new, “lighter” version of Gmail should offer a more user-friendly experience for those with older or less powerful smartphones, toning down the CPU and battery life demands of the full app.

Gmail Go

Google snuck out the release under the radar, so it’s tricky at first to identify exactly what sets Gmail Go apart from its bigger brother. Its posting

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How an Expedition to the Galapagos Islands Saved One of the World’s Largest Natural History Museums | Science

In the spring of 1905, eight researchers from the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco set sail on a mission to complete a major comprehensive survey of the Galapagos Islands, something that no other institution had yet to accomplish. For 17 months, well-trained specialists in the fields of botany, geology, paleontology, entomology, malacology (the study of mollusks), ornithology and herpetology went on a collecting spree. They gathered multiple specimens of plants, birds, mammals, insects and reptiles. While they suspected that the collected specimens would help solidify Darwin’s theory of evolution and inform the world about Galapagos wildlife, they couldn’t have imagined that when they returned home, their city would be recovering from a catastrophic earthquake and conflagration that nearly destroyed their own institution.

“The Galapagos expedition was kind of a way to prove themselves. In the vein of, ‘We’re this scrappy little West Coast institution and we want to

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