9 ways to expand computer science equity in high school

Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught

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Almost half of U.S. high schools now teach at least one computer science course. That means, however, students at a majority of high schools don’t have access to computer science, according to a new report.

And Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught, according to “State of Computer Science Education: Illuminating Disparities” by Code.org, the Computer Science Teachers Association, and the Expanding Computing Education Pathways Alliance.

Students from rural areas and economically disadvantaged backgrounds are also less likely to have a chance to take computer science.

Students in these underrepresented groups are also less likely than are white and Asian American teeens to attend a school that offers an advanced placement computer science course or to an

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Pittsburgh-Area School Districts Use Technology To Help Students Learn In New Ways

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Teaching remotely is a big challenge, but many local school districts are taking advantage of new technology.

Teachers at Pine-Richland schools wear wireless microphones and use tracking cameras, document cameras and interactive display boards with mounted cameras so students both in school and at home can see the same things.

In the Elizabeth Forward and Avonworth school districts, teachers are using Gizmos virtual science labs, which allows students to manipulate the variables and work together.



a person standing in front of a computer


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Elizabeth Forward Middle School eighth-grader Joseph Maksin grew virtual plants.

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“You got to pick what type of plant you were using, how much soil, the amount of sun it was getting, how much water it was getting, and it would show a time-lapse of how it was growing,” said Maksin.

His pre-biology teacher at Elizabeth Forward Middle School, Rachel Lintelman, said, “I

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the parents in England refusing to send their children back to school

Schools are losing touch with some of the most vulnerable families across England during the pandemic, as the threat of truancy fines leads parents to de-register their children, with many feeling abandoned and isolated.



Photograph: Dan Kitwood/Getty


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Photograph: Dan Kitwood/Getty

The government has said that parents who do not send their children back to school should face the usual penalties for non-attendance. But, although ministers say missing school would put “a huge dent in children’s life chances”, some families with members suffering from serious health conditions say it is not worth the risk. With headteachers saying they cannot authorise their absences because of the government’s policy, they face fines of between £60 and £2,500 for each parent.

Some heads are demanding letters from doctors to prove families’ health vulnerabilities, causing confusion as GPs say it is not their job to intervene. Education Otherwise, which supports home educators, says

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Video: Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology Alumni Speak in Support of Merit Lottery Plan

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See below for video of Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology (“TJ”) alumni speaking in support of the TJ Merit Lottery Plan. For some background on this issue, see As People Across America Protest Racial Inequity, #1 Public High School in the Country (“TJ” in Fairfax, VA) Just Admitted ZERO African Americans [UPDATED]; Thomas Jefferson High School Alumni Action Group Endorses Merit Lottery System for “TJ” Admissions;Loudoun County School Board Sends Letter to Fairfax County School Board Expressing Concerns Over Changes to “TJ” Admissions Process; Audio: VA Secretary of Education Atif Qarni Argues for Changes in Admissions to Governor’s Schools to Increase Diversity; Says “It will only make these schools better”; WaPo Allows Torrent of Racist Comments in Article on Blacks, Latinos Being Underrepresented at Thomas Jefferson HS; etc.

Basically, the argument is that admissions to “TJ” should be based not on the “singular skill…of test taking”

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SURVEY: Should the gym at the High School of Science and Technology be named in honor of the late Kamari “Coach” Williams?

Posted: Updated:

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WWLP) – The Springfield Public Schools School Committee is looking for the public’s input on naming a high school gym in honor of their head coach who passed away in April.

Springfield Public Schools spokesperson Azell Cavaan told 22News, the late Coach Kamari Williams served as Head Coach of the men’s varsity basketball team at the High School of Science and Technology from 2014 until his death in April of 2020.

Williams was also an adjustment counselor at Springfield High School and was formally a math teacher at the High School of Science and Technology.

High School of Science and Technology Principal Kevin Lalime thanked the School Committee for taking on the initiative. “There’s nothing we want more as a school community, than to ensure that the legacy of Coach Williams 

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School bond and mill levy override

Ballot measure 4A, also called the Debt-Free Schools ballot initiative, seeks to invest in personnel across Denver Public Schools, specifically by increasing wages for hourly workers, offering a cost-of-living raise for teachers, and adding mental health professionals and nurses. The measure would be funded by an increase in property taxes; that increase is based on the “assessed value” of each property. If approved, the district estimates property taxes will increase about $51 annually, or $4.25 per month, for a home valued at $465,000.

The case for: Proponents of the measure see it as an investment in Denver children. By contributing funds to hiring and increasing pay for teachers, school staff and mental health professionals, the district believes every student can receive a high-quality education and receive the social-emotional support they need to navigate the coronavirus pandemic.

The case against: Opponents argue that now, in the midst of a pandemic that

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Three New York Counties Partner with Verra Mobility to Implement School Bus Stop Arm Safety Camera Programs

Enforcement set to begin in Broome, Oneida and Orange Counties in 2021

Verra Mobility (NASDAQ: VRRM), a global leader in smart transportation, announced that it has been awarded multi-year contracts with three New York counties to deploy CrossingGuard™, an automated stop arm photo enforcement solution that enhances safety by reducing the number of vehicles that illegally pass a school bus as children enter and exit.

The recently awarded contracts include Broome County, Oneida County, and Orange County. Combined, these counties account for a total of 44 school districts, approximately 135,500 students and thousands of school buses.

The announcement comes as Verra Mobility continues its ongoing commitment to support school safety in the state. By the end of 2020, Verra Mobility is on track to have more than 1,000 school zone speed safety cameras installed in New York City, one of the largest safety camera programs in the country.

The need

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Meet The Moorestown School Board Candidates: Mick Weeks

MOORESTOWN, NJ — When voters cast their ballots in the Nov. 3 elections, they will be asked to choose three people from a field of six to serve on the Moorestown Public School District’s Board of Education.

Patch asked each candidate to answer questions to give voters information about who they are and their stances on various issues. We are printing their responses in full, unedited except for spelling or punctuation. Below are the responses from incumbent Board Member Mick Weeks.

Previous elective office, if any

Served one term on Moorestown BOE from 2017-19.

Does anyone in your family work for the school district or in politics?

BA — Seton Hall University — Communications & Anthropology, 1992
MPA — University of Kentucky — Master of Public Administration, 1996

Technology Sales — Northeast Strategic Account Executive for Higher Education at Jamf, LLC — In my current role at Jamf, LLC I

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How teaching hope in school may be the elusive key to success

  • Richard Miller is an expert in child development and a professor at the T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamic at Arizona State University.
  • He says science has documented how teaching hope as both a cognitive function and a practice can be a powerful strategy for success.
  • Miller believes that teaching children to imagine their goals encourages the brain to plan and prepare for future challenges and opportunities.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

On Erin Gruwell’s first day as a high school English teacher, she faced a classroom of 150 “at risk” freshmen. Most of these kids, statistically, were going to fail. They were tough, their young lives already defined by poverty, gangs, violence, and low expectations. These students, she wrote, knew nearly every “four-letter word” except one: hope.

Yet four years later, every one of her “at risk” students at Wilson High School in Long

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How should a premier magnet school boost Black and Latino enrollment? A suggested lottery spurs fierce debate.

Aware of the problem, several previous administrators tried to alter the admissions system, but none of their efforts yielded concrete results. For many — although not for the handful of Black and Latino students and graduates — the issue faded into the background until this summer, when protests over the murder of George Floyd began to spread nationally. Around the same time, the Fairfax school system released numbers showing that Thomas Jefferson’s Class of 2024 included less than 10 Black students.

Those twin events led to a huge spike in activism, as students and alumni formed action groups, began sharing their own experiences with racism at TJ and lobbied school leaders to take action. Again and again, they rehashed the statistics: In 2019-2020, mirroring years-long trends, the student body of roughly 1,800 was 70 percent Asian, 20 percent White, 2.6 percent Hispanic and less than 2 percent Black.

A few

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