Markets Enter New Phase | Seeking Alpha

The financial markets have been driven by the coronavirus, Fed policy, government stimulus, and politics up to now, but a change is in order.

We now see an earnings driven market, which will benefit active over passive managers and hard research, which is our forte. We recommend focusing on operating margins as corporations have done a great job navigating through the pandemic cutting costs, using more technology, shifting more functions online, and restructuring operations/supply lines. All of this is occurring faster than we assumed a few months ago when we began focusing on improving operating margins, operating profits, and cash flow.

Not all companies will benefit equally. We expect the larger, well-financed companies with forward-thinking management to significantly increase market share at the expense of small and medium less-financed competitors. Expect many of them to provide dividend hikes, renew buybacks, and make bolt-on acquisitions. Listen closely to the upcoming earnings

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House space subcommittee chair still seeking NASA plan for 2024 lunar landing

WASHINGTON — The chair of the House space subcommittee says NASA has still not convinced her that the agency has a viable plan to return humans to the moon by 2024.

Speaking at a Wilson Center event Oct. 6 about the geopolitics of space, Rep. Kendra Horn (D-Okla.) said she was waiting to see a plan from NASA that explained how the agency’s Artemis program could meet its goal of a human return to the lunar surface in four years.

“We still haven’t seen a plan that shows us we can get to the moon on the 2024 schedule,” she said, including the ability of NASA to manage “multiple, simultaneous, large” development programs and the various demonstrations leading up to that crewed landing.

Such a plan was an element of a NASA authorization bill that she introduced in January with other leaders of the House Science Committee from both parties.

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Japan’s Sony and Kioxia seeking U.S. approval to supply to Huawei – Nikkei

FILE PHOTO: A Huawei company logo is pictured at the Shenzhen International Airport in Shenzhen, Guangdong province, China, July 22, 2019. REUTERS/Aly Song/File Photo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s Sony Corp and memory chipmaker Kioxia Holdings Corp have applied for U.S. approval to continue supplying Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, Nikkei reported on Sunday.

If confirmed, the move follows other tech companies such as Intel Corp that recently received licences from U.S. authorities.

With U.S.-China ties at their worst in decades, Washington has been pushing governments around to world to squeeze out Huawei, arguing that the telecoms giant would transfer data to the Chinese government for espionage.

Huawei is one of the top customers for Sony’s image sensors for smartphones. Kioxia Holdings Corp is the world’s No. 2 maker of flash memory chips and a Huawei supplier.

Nikkei here said without U.S. licenses, Sony and Kioxia would face risk to their earnings.

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Seeking civility in groups as views clash on Facebook

As division roils the country ahead of the US presidential election, Justine Lee is out to “Make America Dinner Again” and foster understanding in the process.

The creator of the private Facebook group by that name faces the challenge of keeping conversation civil at a social network criticized as a cauldron of toxicity.

MADA was started when Lee, who lives in New York’s Bronx borough, and a friend were stunned by the outcome of the 2016 presidential election and began holding dinner parties to bring together people with opposing political viewpoints.

The dinners caught on. After the coronavirus pandemic struck and prevented face-to-face gatherings, MADA went virtual with a Facebook group.

The group has not shied away from hot-button discussion topics including race, police brutality and abortion.

While Facebook relies on automated systems and user reports to filter out unacceptable vitriol, groups have human moderators who can reject posts or

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Japan’s Sony and Kioxia seeking U.S. approval to supply to Huawei: Nikkei

FILE PHOTO: The Huawei logo is seen at the IFA consumer technology fair, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Berlin, Germany September 3, 2020. REUTERS/Michele Tantussi/File Photo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s Sony Corp and memory chipmaker Kioxia Holdings Corp have applied for U.S. approval to continue supplying Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, Nikkei reported on Sunday.

If confirmed, the move follows other tech companies such as Intel Corp that recently received licences from U.S. authorities.

With U.S.-China ties at their worst in decades, Washington has been pushing governments around to world to squeeze out Huawei, arguing that the telecoms giant would transfer data to the Chinese government for espionage.

Huawei is one of the top customers for Sony’s image sensors for smartphones. Kioxia Holdings Corp is the world’s No. 2 maker of flash memory chips and a Huawei supplier.

Nikkei here said without U.S. licenses, Sony and Kioxia would face

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Market Seems To Be Seeking Direction As Quarter Winds Down

Key Takeaways:

  • Volatile trading could continue after choppy session Thursday
  • Costco earnings beat expectations, but stock loses ground
  • Washington stimulus hopes still ticking, but sides far apart

As the election nears, it feels like there’s been a change in market psychology, and a note of caution on stocks in general following the great summer run-up.

Though stocks fell in pre-market trading this morning, it doesn’t seem like there’s a real sense of direction. Things are just drifting around, waiting for something to happen. This week has featured lots of intraday volatility, and it’s hard to see that changing. It’s a jittery market to both the upside and downside, and investors should be on their toes.

Yesterday’s minor rally that lifted the battered Tech sector seems like a long time ago this morning, with stock index futures down across the board and volatility edging higher. The S&P

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