Your ‘Most Convenient’ Meteor Shower Of 2020 Peaks This Week Near The Big Dipper

If you want to see “shooting stars” this week just look to the northern night sky right after dark.

This week sees the peak of the Draconid meteor shower, an annual event that sees around 10 “shooting stars” per hour appear in the night sky.

Like all meteor showers, it’s best seen in dark skies and requires patience, but while most such displays are best viewed after midnight, there’s something very different about the Draconids.

The one can be viewed right after dark. In fact, it’s going to be at its best right through the night—and there’s a reason for that.

Here’s everything you need to know about seeing “shooting stars” during this peaks Draconid meteor shower.

MORE FROM FORBESWhat’s That Really Bright ‘Star’ In The Night Sky?

What is the Draconid meteor shower? 

Occurring from October 6-10,

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How Often Do You Need To Shower? A Doctor Argues, Less Often Than You Think : Shots

Showers feel fabulous — but how frequent is too frequent for skin ecology?

www.boelke-art.de/Getty Images


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www.boelke-art.de/Getty Images

Showers feel fabulous — but how frequent is too frequent for skin ecology?

www.boelke-art.de/Getty Images

James Hamblin is tired of being asked if he’s smelly.

Hamblin, a physician and health reporter, has been fielding the question since 2016, when the article he wrote about his decision to stop showering went viral. The piece outlines compelling reasons why one might want to spend less time sudsing up: Cosmetic products are expensive, showering uses a lot of water, and the whole process takes up valuable time.

Perhaps most importantly, bathing disrupts our skin’s microbiome: the delicate ecosystem of bacteria, fungi, mites and viruses that live on (and in) our body’s largest organ. Most of these microbes are thought to be benign freeloaders; they feast on our sweat and oils without impacting

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