Study shows surge of emergency room visits since introduction of rideshare e-scooters — ScienceDaily

A Henry Ford Health System physician is sounding the alarm on the rising number of injuries caused from riding electric scooters, calling it a growing public health concern.

In a study of e-scooter injuries, Kathleen Yaremchuk, M.D., chair of the Department of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, says a review of emergency visits in the last three years shows e-scooter injuries have increased significantly with many of them related to head and neck injuries. The study describes how the types of injuries which include concussions, fractures, contusions and abrasions, lacerations and internal organ injuries have changed since the introduction of e-scooter rideshare systems to the public in September 2017.

The study’s break down on the type of injuries shows that head and neck injuries made up nearly 28% of the total injuries. Results were also broken down by age groups and showed that from 2009 to 2017, patients who

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Tech Companies Need More Skilled Workers, CTA Study Shows

ARLINGTON, Va., Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Three in four technology companies (75%) face difficulty finding candidates with the right skills and abilities today, according to the annual Consumer Technology Association (CTA)® Future of Work Study. For the first time, the annual study – which surveyed 240 tech industry leaders on workforce trends – also explores how the tech sector is embracing diversity and inclusion and adapting amid the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The study finds four in five (80%) employers will need more employees with technical skills. Employers say the most in-demand technical skills at their company are data analytics (57%), software development (56%) and project management (56%). However, companies are also looking beyond technical skills to soft skills. The top soft skills employers look for are communication (85%), problem-solving (83%) and critical thinking (83%). 

To find and recruit skilled candidates, almost three-quarters of respondents (72%) say they will

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Animal study shows treatment blocks inflammation and protects lungs without killing the flu virus — ScienceDaily

The raging lung inflammation that can contribute to death from the flu can be stopped in its tracks by a drug derived from a naturally occurring human protein, a new animal study suggests.

In mouse studies, all untreated animals given a lethal dose of influenza died within days. All but one of the infected mice treated with the experimental therapy not only survived, but remained energetic and kept weight on — despite having high levels of the flu virus in their lungs.

The experimental treatment is a heavy dose of MG53, part of a family of proteins that plays an essential role in cell membrane repair. Already identified as a potential therapy for conditions ranging from Alzheimer’s disease to persistent skin wounds, MG53 was found in this study to prevent death from a lethal flu infection by blocking excessive inflammation — without having any effect on the virus itself.

The

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NASA efforts had a $65 billion economic impact last year, agency report shows

NASA’s first economic impact report suggests that the agency generated nearly $65 billion in economic impact during fiscal year 2019, with much of that activity coming from the Artemis program to return astronauts to the moon by 2024.



NASA's Space Launch System rocket, or SLS, is just one piece of the agency's "moon to Mars" initiative.


© Provided by Space
NASA’s Space Launch System rocket, or SLS, is just one piece of the agency’s “moon to Mars” initiative.

The agency released the report (which covers the period between Oct. 1, 2018 to Sept. 30, 2019) as it continues negotiations for its fiscal 2021 budget. That 2021 budget request by the Trump administration calls for a 12% increase for the agency to $25 billion, including a substantial contribution to Artemis for a planned 2024 astronaut landing on the moon. That budget has not been approved yet, as both the House and Senate continue markups of their versions of the bill. On Sept. 30, the Senate averted a government shutdown

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Body camera footage shows chaos

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LMPD body camera footage shows the moments of chaos and confusion in the aftermath of the March 13 Breonna Taylor shooting.

Louisville Courier Journal

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Everywhere there was confusion and chaos.

“10-30! 10-30! Officer down! Officer shot on Springfield!” an officer frantically told a dispatcher.

Body cameras worn by Louisville Metro Police officers who raced to the St. Anthony Gardens apartment complex on Springfield Drive around 1 a.m. March 13 captured the frantic aftermath on tape.

An officer was shot, they were told. The shooter was still in the apartment.

What they weren’t told — not right away — was that a 26-year-old woman was shot dead inside.

Her name was Breonna Taylor.

The dramatic video footage from the officers who arrived on the scene was released last week as part of the investigative file into Taylor’s death.

There is no footage of the shooting itself. The

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Whale’s Resurfacing Shows Danger Persists in the Options Market

(Bloomberg) — Stock traders assessing the looming presidential election and a stalling economic recovery also need to keep an eye on the options market.

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While the frenetic pace of speculation in derivatives has eased a bit recently, it hasn’t stopped, and a chorus of analysts warns the trading remains capable of exacerbating swings in equities. One proxy for the froth still latent in options, the percentage of overall volume represented by single-stock contracts, remains up 19% from a year ago, according to JPMorgan Chase & Co. Most of it is concentrated in megacap technology and momentum-driven shares.

Meanwhile, a large buyer of tech calls dubbed the Nasdaq whale recently resurfaced, purchasing around $200 million worth of call contracts on tech stocks in a single day. The Nasdaq 100 Index has gained in all but two sessions this month and just notched its best week since July after last

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Analysis: North Korea’s Kim speaks softly, shows off new military might

SEOUL (Reuters) – North Korea’s unprecedented nighttime military parade on Saturday showcased an unusually broad array of new weapons, from a show-stopping “monster” ballistic missile to previously unseen battle tanks.

FILE PHOTO: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un reacts as he attends a parade to mark the 75th anniversary of the founding of the ruling Workers’ Party of Korea, in this image released by North Korea’s Central News Agency on October 10, 2020. KCNA via REUTERS

The hardware, likely still in varying stages of development, offered leader Kim Jong Un a chance to show the world his cutting-edge military power while adding practical capabilities to the North Korea’s already formidable nuclear and conventional forces, experts said.

Kim is walking a fine line, seeking to increase pressure on the United States to ease sanctions while not destroying rapport with U.S. President Donald Trump or Pyongyang’s partners in China.

“Kim Jong Un’s

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Experimental glioblastoma therapy shows curative powers in mice models — ScienceDaily

Houston Methodist researchers found that mice harboring human glioblastoma tumors in their brains had greatly enhanced survival and weight gain when given a newly developed prodrug. This mitochondrial-targeted prodrug — an inactive compound that cancer cells selectively metabolize to produce an active toxic drug — also greatly improves outcomes when coupled with standard therapies of radiation and/or chemotherapy. The drug selectively targets and destroys the DNA inside the glioblastoma cell mitochondria (the energy factory of the cancer cell) leaving normal cells intact.

In an Oct. 8 study published online in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, investigators used a second generation prodrug called MP-Pt(IV) to target the deadly cells of glioblastoma tumors, a brain cancer that is almost always fatal and has no cure. Life expectancy in humans with glioblastoma ranges from a few months to two years.

Human glioma cells were removed

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There’s a gene for detecting that fishy smell, olfactory GWAS shows — ScienceDaily

For many people, the smell of fish is rather strong and unpleasant. But some people carry a mutation in a particular gene that makes that fish odor less intense, reports a paper publishing October 8 in the journal Current Biology. The study, which is the largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) of olfactory genes in humans involving a sniff test and looked at over 9,000 people from Iceland, also shows that people vary in their ability to discern the smell of licorice and cinnamon.

“We discovered sequence variants that influence how we perceive and describe fish, licorice, and cinnamon odors,” said Rosa Gisladottir of deCODE Genetics in Reykjavik, Iceland. “Since our sense of smell is very important for the perception of flavor, these variants likely influence whether we like food containing these odors.”

Researchers have known that people perceive odors based on olfactory receptors encoded by 855 olfactory genes. But

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Study shows how climate impacts food webs, poses socioeconomic threat in Eastern Africa

Study shows how climate impacts food webs, poses socioeconomic threat in Eastern Africa
The research team spent 12 days on Lake Tanganyika collecting core samples from the lake’s floor. They chartered a Congolese merchant vessel, seen here, and adapted it for their research project. Credit: Michael McGlue, University of Kentucky

A new study is sounding the alarm on the impact climate change could have on one of the world’s most vulnerable regions.


Michael McGlue, Pioneer Natural Resources Professor of Stratigraphy in the University of Kentucky Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, and his team conducted the study at Lake Tanganyika—a major African fishery. The results, which published today in Science Advances, show how certain changes in climate may place the fishery at risk, potentially diminishing food resources for millions of people in this area of eastern Africa.

“Lake Tanganyika’s fish are a critically important resource for impoverished people from four nations (Tanzania, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi and Zambia) and resilience

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