Welcome to Silicon Allee: the new global tech hubs

Tech titans are attracting the world’s brightest talent, creating a concentration of wealth and investment in new city hubs. So much so that buyers intending to purchase a property over the next few years would be wise to invest in a place where one of the neighbours is an internet superstar. Or studying to become one. Research carried out by international estate agents Savills suggests that prices in its 30-strong list of “tech cities” will rise nearly twice as rapidly as those in their global counterparts.

Some tech cities, of course, have fared better than others, and Singapore has been one of the world’s clear winners. With its high quality of life and reputable universities – Nanyang Technological University and the National University of Singapore stand sixth and eighth respectively in the QS World University Rankings for engineering and technology – it remains very popular with investors looking for the

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Apple May Delay First Mac Computer With Own Silicon Processor

KEY POINTS

  • Apple is working on a Mac that’s powered by in-house silicon
  • The first Mac of this kind will not be launched this month, a report claims
  • The device will be announced during another event in November

It’s not a secret that Apple is working on a Mac that runs on the company’s own silicon. The first device of this kind, however, might not be announced alongside the new iPhones that will be revealed in the Apple event set for Tuesday, a report said.

Apple previously said that it will transition its Macs from Intel chips to in-house silicon. At the time, the company said that it will be able to release the first Mac with Apple silicon by the end of the year. A report from Bloomberg, however, said that those who are looking forward to seeing the device during the upcoming Apple event will have to wait

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Commercially Available Silicon Quantum Computer Moves Forward With Quietest Bits On Record

KEY POINTS

  • Physicists achieve a noise level 10 times lower than the previous record
  • Demonstration proves to take a major step closer to a full-scale silicon quantum processor 
  • Next step could be a 10-qubit prototype quantum integrated processor by 2023

The lowest noise level on record for a semiconductor quantum bit has been demonstrated by a team of quantum physicists, bringing the development of a commercially available silicon quantum computer one step forward to possibility. 

In a study published in Advanced Materials, the physicists said they were able to achieve a noise level 10 times lower than previously recorded for any semiconductor qubit. Specifically, they demonstrated a low-level charge noise of  S0 = 0.0088 ± 0.0004 μeV2 Hz−1. 

As a next step, the team is now looking forward to demonstrating the capability required to produce a reliable 10-qubit prototype quantum integrated processor by 2023. 

“Our team is now working towards

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Silicon Valley is famously liberal. Then, investors and employees started clashing over race.

SAN FRANCISCO — The day after President Donald Trump told the Proud Boys, a far-right group with a history of inciting violence, to “stand back and stand by,” during the first presidential debate last month, tech investor Cyan Banister tweeted that the group had “a few bad apples. “

The open defense of an organization that has been deemed a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center is one extreme example of an increasingly public reactionary streak in Silicon Valley that diverges from the tech industry’s image as a bastion of liberalism. Some libertarian, centrist, and right-leaning Silicon Valley investors and executives, who wield outsize influence, power and access to capital, describe tech culture as under siege by activist employees pushing a social justice agenda.

Curtis Yarvin, dubbed a “favorite philosopher of the alt-right” by the Verge, has become a familiar face on the invite-only audio social network Clubhouse,

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The Technology 202: The Michigan kidnapping plot highlights Silicon Valley’s problem with extremism

Social media trails like these are becoming a recurrent feature in violent events ranging from synagogue massacres to bombing plots. 

“Before they become real, they percolate online, courtesy of a social media ecosystem that is ubiquitous, barely moderated and well suited to helping aggrieved people find each other,” my colleagues write. 

Experts in online extremism say the plot exposed by federal and state officials this week highlights the stakes for social media companies to address violent posts on their platform. 

“Social media companies have been allowing these communities to build and grow, ignoring the mounting evidence that memes, posts and images encouraging violence can and do translate into actual violence,” Cindy Otis, a former CIA analyst and vice president of analysis for the Alethea Group, which tracks online threats, told my colleagues. “Not only have many of these Michigan pages and groups been on Facebook for years, the Facebook algorithm

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The Technology 202: Here are seven takeaways from the House’s sweeping report concluding Silicon Valley is too powerful

(Amazon chief executive Jeff Bezos owns The Washington Post). 

The report could provide a regulatory blueprint for lawmakers who have significantly ramped up rhetoric criticizing the tech giants in recent years, but have yet to actually pass any laws that would significantly check the industry’s power. The report’s authors, all Democrats, hope it will be a turning point for how Washington approaches corporate consolidation.

Congress must revive its tradition of robust oversight over the antitrust laws and increased market concentration in our economy,” the report said. 

Here are our top seven takeaways after sifting through the nearly 450-page report:

1. It proposes some most sweeping revisions to antitrust law in decades.

The report proposes changing existing laws in ways that could have far-reaching effects throughout the entire economy. The report recommends:

  • New limits on companies operating in adjacent lines of business, which could impact how tech companies operate
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How the Coinbase memo exemplifies Silicon Valley’s current political crisis

Coinbase, the bitcoin bank valued at $8 billion and expected to go public in 2021, is going through an internal identity crisis.

It started back in June, amid the nationwide protests over the death of George Floyd, when Brian Armstrong, the company’s extremely introverted cofounder and CEO, was asked a question at an employee town hall about why Coinbase had not shown public support for the Black Lives Matter movement. Armstrong declined to give a clear answer, according to crypto news site The Block, and his avoidance resulted in a virtual walkout by “hundreds” of Coinbase’s 1,100 employees on June 3.

The next day, Armstrong tweeted, “I want to unequivocally say that Black Lives Matter.” He added: “I’ve been watching the events of the last few weeks unfold – I really did not know what to say about it for a long time, and I’m still not sure I

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A leading Silicon Valley exec says Big Tech prioritized lower costs over employees’ wellbeing, and it’s created a feudalist system where workers are left to fend for themselves



a man riding on the back of a truck: Sean Gallup/Getty Images


© Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

  • Maëlle Gavet is a leading Silicon Valley executive, entrepreneur, investor, and most recently, the chief operating officer at real estate platform Compass.
  • The following is an excerpt from her first book, “Trampled by Unicorns: Big Tech’s Empathy Problem and How to Fix It.”
  • In it, she examines how Big Tech’s failure to empathize with customers and workers has led to “digital era’s equivalent of feudalism.”
  • In her in-depth critique of the world’s largest tech corporations — including Amazon, Uber, and Google — she crafts an earnest call to action for industry leaders, board members, employees, and consumers to get tech back on track. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Right now the jury is still out on whether the tech economy is ultimately a job creator or a job destroyer. As with many of the points in this book, that topic is

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Global Silicon Metal Market to 2025 – by Manufacturers, Regions, Technology, Application, and Product Type – ResearchAndMarkets.com

Global Silicon Metal Market to 2025 – by Manufacturers, Regions, Technology, Application, and Product Type – ResearchAndMarkets.com

The “Silicon Metal Market Insights 2020, Analysis and Forecast Global and Chinese Market to 2025, by Manufacturers, Regions, Technology, Application, Product Type” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

This report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the global Silicon Metal market with a focus on the Chinese market. The report provides key statistics on market of Silicon Metal. It is a valuable source of guidance and direction for companies and individuals interested in Silicon Metal industry.

Key points of Silicon Metal Market Report:

1. The report provides a basic overview of Silicon Metal industry including: definition, applications and manufacturing technology.

2. The report explores Global and Chinese major players in Silicon Metal market. In this part, the report presents the company profile, product specifications, capacity, production value,

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What Type Of Shareholders Own The Most Number of Silicon Motion Technology Corporation (NASDAQ:SIMO) Shares?

The Telegraph

Nasal spray that gave ’96pc infection cover’ in ferrets could protect from coronavirus

Weekly use of a nasal spray could give 96 per cent protection from coronavirus, new research from Public Health England (PHE) shows. The new preventive treatment could move to human trials within months following successful results on ferrets. The spray was originally developed to boost natural human immunity to common colds and the flu, but has been retested to see whether it would also work for coronavirus. It is produced by the Australian biotech company Ena Respiratory and works by preventing the virus from replicating in the respiratory tract. “We’ve been amazed with just how effective our treatment has been,” said Dr Christophe Demaison, managing director of Ena Respiratory. “By boosting the natural immune response of the ferrets with our treatment, we’ve seen a rapid eradication of the virus. “If humans respond in a similar

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