New Cadence Clarity 3D Transient Solver Delivers up to 10X Faster System-Level EMI Simulation

System design teams can quickly and accurately simulate large and complex hyperscale, automotive, mobile, and aerospace and defense systems

Cadence Design Systems, Inc. (Nasdaq: CDNS) today expanded its system analysis product line with the introduction of the Cadence® Clarity 3D Transient Solver, a system-level simulation solution that solves electromagnetic interference (EMI) system design issues up to 10X faster than legacy 3D field solvers and offers unbounded capacity. Built on Cadence’s massively parallel matrix solver technology, the Clarity 3D Transient Solver handles workload levels that previously required time-consuming and expensive anechoic test chambers to test prototypes for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) compliance. The new solver is capable of simulating large designs that until now have been impractical or unable to be solved, reducing respins and accelerating time to market. This makes it ideal for many complex applications in the hyperscale computing, automotive, mobile, and aerospace and defense markets. For more

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AI researchers challenge a robot to ride a skateboard in simulation

AI researchers say they’ve created a framework for controlling four-legged robots that promises better energy efficiency and adaptability than more traditional model-based gait control of robotic legs. To demonstrate the robust nature of the framework that adjusts to conditions in real time, AI researchers made the system slip on frictionless surfaces to mimic a banana peel, ride a skateboard, and climb on a bridge while walking on a treadmill. An Nvidia spokesperson told VentureBeat that only the frictionless surface test was conducted in real life because of limits placed on office staff size due to COVID-19. The spokesperson said all other challenges took place in simulation. (Simulations are often used as training data for robotics systems before those systems are used in real life.)

“Our framework learns a controller that can adapt to challenging environmental changes on the fly, including novel scenarios not seen during training. The learned controller is

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New Simulation Technology Helps Get the Jump on Wildfires

The Sonoma-Lake-Napa Unit (LNU) wildfires in California burned nearly 200,000 acres before finally being contained. But in the process, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE) was able to deploy a simulation technology that helps firefighters predict the actions of a wildfire and deploy resources more quickly where needed. 

The data has always been available, but only within silos and compiling that data traditionally took hours or days. The technology, developed by Technosylva, was partially deployed by CAL FIRE in July during the LNU fires and showed a rapid spread of the wildfire. 

“We’re rolling it out over a three-phased implementation period,” said Christine McMorrow, CAL FIRE resource management communications officer. “Our first phase went live July 31 in four fire units at our training centers and regional and Sacramento command centers.”

Phase two was scheduled to go live Oct. 1 in half of the CAL FIRE

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