New evidence CBT can help treat sleep, depression cycle — ScienceDaily

Insomnia causing sleepless nights, daytime fatigue and poor health outcomes is a cycle worth busting, experts say, with depression, anxiety and stress a common co-occurrence.

A study of more than 450 insomnia patients in Australia has confirmed some positive results for such patients with insomnia.

The Flinders University researchers found not only that a program of targeted cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia help relieve insomnia — but also has a positive effect on symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress.

“With COVID-19 and many other stressors in life, treating the worst effects of insomnia may have a transformative effect on a person’s wellbeing, mental health and lifestyle,” says lead researcher Dr Alexander Sweetman, from Flinders University’s sleep research clinic, the Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health.

“We studied the impact of depression, anxiety, and stress on response to CBTi, in 455 ‘real world’ insomnia patients, from pre-treatment to three-month follow-up,” Dr Sweetman

Read More
Read More

Researchers used miniature microscopes to conduct first-ever study of astrocyte calcium activity in sleep in freely behaving animals — ScienceDaily

A new study published today in the journal Current Biology suggests that star-shaped brain cells known as astrocytes could be as important to the regulation of sleep as neurons, the brain’s nerve cells.

Led by researchers at Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, the study builds new momentum toward ultimately solving the mystery of why we sleep and how sleep works in the brain. The discovery may also set the stage for potential future treatment strategies for sleep disorders and neurological diseases and other conditions associated with troubled sleep, such as PTSD, depression, Alzheimer’s disease, and autism spectrum disorder.

“What we know about sleep has been based largely on neurons,” said lead author and postdoctoral research associate Ashley Ingiosi. Neurons, she explained, communicate through electrical signals that can be readily captured through electroencephalography (EEG). Astrocytes — a type of glial (or “glue”) cell that interacts with neurons

Read More
Read More