Can temperature scanning slow COVID-19 spread? Airports are the testing ground for new tech

A camera in the security lines at Dallas Love Field is scanning every passerby for elevated temperatures, in a test by the airport and Southwest Airlines to find out if it can detect sick people before they board flights.

In the back hallways, employees are getting temperature checks at kiosks before they start work each day, trying to keep sick employees out of the airport, too.

As airlines, companies and governments scramble to reopen a battered economy facing the eighth month of a worldwide pandemic, airports are now the frontline for evolving thermal imaging technologies designed to pick out infected travelers before they can spread COVID-19 further.

Temperature scanning device makers such as Dallas-based Wello Inc. and Beaumont’s Infared Cameras Inc. have suddenly been inundated with requests for their technology. Even small restaurants, hotels and schools are asking about it.

“It’s not just convention centers and airlines,” said Gary Strahan,

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Nobel Prizes and COVID-19: Slow, basic science may pay off

It may soon do so again.

Science builds upon previous work, with thinkers “standing on the shoulders of giants,” as Isaac Newton put it, and it starts with basic research aimed at understanding a problem before fixing it. It’s that type of basic science that the Nobels usually reward, often years or decades after a discovery, because it can take that long to realize the implications.

Slow and steady success in science has made researchers hopeful in the fight against the pandemic. It even offers a glimmer of climate optimism.

Many years of advances in basic molecular science, some of them already Nobel Prize-winning, have given the world tools for fast virus identification and speeded up the development

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Drive-thru times at fast-food chains slow by nearly 30 seconds as demand soars

As consumers increasingly pick up their fast-food orders from the comfort of their car, average drive-thru times across 10 chains slowed down by nearly half a minute, according to an annual study conducted by SeeLevel HX.

Drive-thru lanes have always been an important feature for fast-food restaurants, but the coronavirus pandemic has heavily shifted consumer preferences in favor of the easy pick-up option, which also appears more safe to consumers. Drive-thru visits increased by 26% in April, May and June, according to data from the NPD Group. Taco Bell said that it served an additional 4.8 million cars through its drive-thru lanes during its second quarter.

The abrupt change in consumer behavior has motivated restaurant chains like Starbucks and Chipotle Mexican Grill to add more drive-thru lanes to their restaurants.

Total average drive-thru times slowed down by 29.8 seconds this year, weighed down by longer wait times, according to SeeLevel

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Quibi’s Slow Start Puts Pressure on Katzenberg to Boost Cash

(Bloomberg) — Quibi, one of Hollywood’s most ballyhooed startups, is having a rocky first year.

Founder Jeffrey Katzenberg  envisioned an app that would entertain people during the odd, in-between times in their lives — while commuting, say, or waiting in line at the bank. But when the April launch date arrived, Americans were in lockdown due to the coronavirus, meaning such moments had all but disappeared.

On Sept. 21, the Wall Street Journal reported that Quibi has so far failed to reach its subscriber targets and is working with advisers to assess its options, including a possible sale or a capital raise.  



Jeffrey Katzenberg sitting on a bench: Quibi Founder Jeffrey Katzenberg And CEO Meg Whitman Interview


© Bloomberg
Quibi Founder Jeffrey Katzenberg And CEO Meg Whitman Interview

A lot can change in the future. Quibi could have a wildly popular hit show that lures in millions of new subscribers. A nation of smartphone consumers venturing back into the world could embrace the service as 

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UCSF Launches Pilot of Privacy-Preserving Smartphone Tool to Help Slow Spread of COVID-19

woman wearing a mask and looking at a cellphone

UC San Francisco is piloting the use of California COVID Notify, a smartphone-based tool that allows users to opt-in to receive an alert if they’ve had a high-risk exposure to COVID-19.

Starting Sept. 30, students, faculty and staff at UCSF will be invited to activate COVID Notify on their smartphones. Those who opt in will be among the first Californians to test the tool as part of a limited pilot that will help policymakers decide whether to make COVID Notify available statewide.

“We’re hoping to find out if exposure notification tools like COVID Notify can supplement the essential work being done every day by human contact tracers,” said Robert Kosnik, MD, director of the UCSF Occupational Health Program, which is overseeing the rollout of the tool at UCSF. “If the pilot succeeds, it may lead to widespread adoption of COVID Notify, providing Californians with a convenient tool that may help

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