Astronomers solve dark matter puzzle of strange galaxy — ScienceDaily

At present, the formation of galaxies is difficult to understand without the presence of a ubiquitous, but mysterious component, termed dark matter. Astronomers have measure how much dark matter there is around galaxies, and have found that it varies between 10 and 300 times the quantity of visible matter. However, a few years ago, the discovery of a very diffuse object, named Dragonfly 44, changed this view. It was found that this galaxy has 10,000 times more dark matter than the stars. Taken back by this finding, astronomers have made efforts to see whether this object is really anomalous, or whether something went wrong in the analysis of the observations. Now we have the answer.

An international team led by the Kapteyn Institute of the University of Groningen (the Netherlands), with participation by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of La Laguna (ULL), has found that

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Geologists solve puzzle that could predict valuable rare earth element deposits

Geologists solve puzzle that could predict valuable rare earth element deposits
Pioneering new research has helped geologists solve a long-standing puzzle that could help pinpoint new, untapped concentrations of some the most valuable rare earth deposits. Credit: Michael Anenburg, ANU.

Pioneering new research has helped geologists solve a long-standing puzzle that could help pinpoint new, untapped concentrations of some the most valuable rare earth deposits.


A team of geologists, led by Professor Frances Wall from the Camborne School of Mines, have discovered a new hypothesis to predict where rare earth elements neodymium and dysprosium could be found.

The elements are among the most sought after, because they are an essential part of digital and clean energy manufacturing, including magnets in large wind turbines and electric cars motors.

For the new research, scientists conducted a series of experiments that showed sodium and potassium—rather than chlorine or fluorine as previously thought—were the key ingredients for making these rare earth elements soluble.

This is

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Geologists solve puzzle that could predict valuable rare earth element deposits — ScienceDaily

Pioneering new research has helped geologists solve a long-standing puzzle that could help pinpoint new, untapped concentrations of some the most valuable rare earth deposits.

A team of geologists, led by Professor Frances Wall from the Camborne School of Mines, have discovered a new hypothesis to predict where rare earth elements neodymium and dysprosium could be found.

The elements are among the most sought after, because they are an essential part of digital and clean energy manufacturing, including magnets in large wind turbines and electric cars motors.

For the new research, scientists conducted a series of experiments that showed sodium and potassium — rather than chlorine or fluorine as previously thought — were the key ingredients for making these rare earth elements soluble.

This is crucial as it determines whether they crystalise — making them fit for extraction — or stayed dissolved in fluids.

The experiments could therefore allow geologists

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Researchers solve 100-year-old metallurgy puzzle

LLNL team solves 100-year-old metallurgy puzzle
To understand exactly how metals respond to high-rate compression in molecular dynamics simulations, LLNL scientists use novel methods of in silico microscopy to reveal defects in the crystal lattice (green and red line objects and gray surface objects at the top) while removing all the atoms (yellow balls at the bottom) for clarity. Credit: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

To solve a 100-year puzzle in metallurgy about why single crystals show staged hardening while others don’t, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists took it down to the atomistic level.


The research appears in the Oct. 5 edition of Nature Materials.

For millennia, humans have exploited the natural property of metals to become stronger or harden when mechanically deformed. Ultimately rooted in the motion of dislocations, mechanisms of metal hardening have remained in the crosshairs of physical metallurgists for more than a century.

The team headed by LLNL materials scientist Vasily

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Neuromorphic computing could solve the tech industry’s looming crisis

What’s the best computer in the world? The most souped-up, high-end gaming rig? Whatever supercomputer took the number one spot in the TOP500 this year? The kit inside the datacentres that Apple or Microsoft rely on? Nope: it’s the one inside your skull. 

As computers go, brains are way ahead of the competition. They’re small, lightweight, have low energy consumption, and are amazingly adaptable. And they’re also set to be the model for the next wave of advanced computing.

These brain-inspired designs are known collectively as ‘neuromorphic computing’. Even the most advanced computers don’t come close to the human brain — or even most mammal brains — but our grey matter can give engineers and developers a few pointers on how to make computing infrastrastructure more efficient, by mimicking the brain’s own synapses and neurones.

SEE: Building the bionic brain (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

First, the biology. Neurones are nerve cells,

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Rackspace Technology and Cloud Security Leader, Armor, Announce The New Cybersecurity Landscape Solve Strategy Series Webinar

SAN ANTONIO, Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Rackspace Technology™ (NASDAQ: RXT), a leading end-to-end multicloud technology solutions company, will co-sponsor The New Cybersecurity Landscape virtual event with Armor® on October 7th at 10:00 am CT as part of the company’s Solve Strategy Series. From Zoom bombing to account takeovers, through access mining and phishing, the event will shed light on emerging security threats and empower viewers with practical ideas on how to build a safer future.

Keren Elazari, TED speaker, security analyst, and friendly hacker, will deliver a keynote on how security challenges have changed in the age of COVID-19. She will then be joined by cybersecurity experts from Plus500™, Armor, and Rackspace Technology for a panel discussion on what has changed in the cybersecurity landscape and what businesses must do to adapt.

“This pandemic has been a renaissance for bad actors in the cybersecurity space,” said

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Women Use Tech To Solve Women’s Health Problems, A Market Men Ignore

Amanda French, co-founder & CEO at Emme, is applying her medical device development background to solve the oral contraceptives’ missed pill problem. After three years of building and testing its Bluetooth-enabled “smart case,” which works with more than 100 birth control brands, it has launched. 

When you miss taking a pill, the app automatically sends user-customized reminders. It notifies at-risk users when back-up contraception is needed. The app also allows users to track symptoms in the categories of “mood, body, sex, and flow” related to their menstrual cycles or hormones. When you track symptoms, you can see patterns as they pertain to pill habits. The data can be used to understand the effects specific birth control pills have on hormonal issues and help women and their doctors find the right pill in the right dose. But, like many female founders

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Ekto’s robotic boots may solve VR locomotion problems

Ekto VR thinks it might have just solved VR locomotion.

The Pittsburgh-based company has revealed its first product: the Ekto One. It’s a pair of robotic boots that the company claims are capable of keeping you in one spot while you walk forward. There’s no simulating walking on the spot or strapping yourself into a VR treadmill. Check it out working with Half-Life: Alyx in the above video.

The shoes use a carbon-fiber design that Ekto says is lightweight and use HTC’s Vive Tracker pucks to track movement in VR. On the bottom of the device are two rotating plates that can twist to the direction the user is walking in. Once they put their foot on the ground, a set of wheels pull your leg back while you walk forward, supposedly giving the sensation of walking, but keeping you in one spot. It uses brakes for when you’re standing

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