Astronomers Observe Star Being ‘Spaghettified’ by a Supermassive Black Hole

Artist’s impression of a star undergoing spaghettification near a supermassive black hole.

Artist’s impression of a star undergoing spaghettification near a supermassive black hole.
Image: ESO

A star 215 million light-years away has been obliterated by a supermassive black hole, making it the closest observation to date of stellar spaghettification.

Spaghettification doesn’t sound very scientific, but it’s a fairly accurate description of what actually happens.

A doomed star caught in the orbit of a supermassive black hole will eventually hit a kind of gravitational sweet spot that turns everything to shit. No longer capable of keeping its physical integrity, the star begins to rapidly collapse in a process known as a fast-evolving tidal disruption event. When this happens, stellar debris bursts out from the star, forming a long, thin stream, half of which gets sucked toward the black hole; the other half is blown back into space. The thin stream eventually catches up to and slams into itself, releasing energy and

Read More
Read More

We Watched As A Nearby Star Was Sucked In And ‘Spaghettified’ By A Monster Black Hole, Say Scientists

A star in the act of being devoured by a supermassive black hole. It’s the latest incredible cosmic phenomenon tracked and traced by astronomers using giant telescopes.

This iconic “tidal disruption event”—named “AT2019qiz”—occurred 215 million light-years away, which makes it the closest observed so far. 

“The idea of a black hole “sucking in” a nearby star sounds like science fiction, but this is exactly what happens in a tidal disruption event,” said Dr Matt Nicholl, a lecturer and Royal

Read More
Read More