The Dangerous Security Of An Amazon Drone That Spies On The Inside Of Your Home

Amazon’s
AMZN
home-security business Ring announced a niche offering Thursday: a drone that flies inside a house. Dubbed the “Always Home Cam,” this interior surveillance apparatus is designed to ship in 2021, with an expected list price of $250. It is, in many ways, a caricature of gimmick drones, of home security, and of what an opt-in panopticon offers.

Ring’s Always Home Cam is a quadcopter built only for indoor flight, its small rotors contained in boxy protective grills. Its body, dangling from below the rotors, contains a 1080p video camera, which effectively shutters itself inside a charging station when the drone is at rest. While the dimensions are not yet public, the largest Ring device on the market today is barely longer than 5 inches, and it is safe to assume the Always Home Cam

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Chinese spies infiltrating US law enforcement, business world a ‘real threat:’ NYPD commissioner

Chinese spies infiltrating U.S. law enforcement and the business world poses a “real threat” to the country, New York City Police Commissioner Dermot Shea said on Friday.

“I think this is something everyone should be aware of,” Shea told FOX Business’ Maria Bartiromo during an interview. “Not just NYPD, but any business should be aware of. This is a real threat.”

WILL A US-HEADQUARTERED TIKTOK BE ENOUGH TO ENSURE PRIVACY?

Shea’s comments came several days after federal prosecutors charged a New York City police officer, who is also a U.S. Army reservist, with acting as an illegal agent of China since 2018.

Baimadajie Angwang, a naturalized U.S. citizen from

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Instagram bug opened a path for hackers to hijack app, turn smartphones into spies

Facebook has patched a critical vulnerability in Instagram that could lead to remote code execution and the hijack of smartphone cameras, microphones, and more. 

Privately disclosed to Facebook, the owner of Instagram, by Check Point, the security flaw is described as “a critical vulnerability in Instagram’s image processing.”

Tracked as CVE-2020-1895 and issued a CVSS score of 7.8, Facebook’s security advisory says the vulnerability is a heap overflow problem.

See also: Adobe out-of-band patch released to tackle Media Encoder vulnerabilities

“A large heap overflow could occur in Instagram for Android when attempting to upload an image with specially crafted dimensions. This affects versions prior to 128.0.0.26.128,” the advisory says. 

In a blog post on Thursday, Check Point cybersecurity researchers said sending a single malicious image was enough to take over Instagram. An attack can be triggered once a crafted image is sent — via email, WhatsApp, SMS, or any other

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