Stacking and twisting graphene unlocks a rare form of magnetism

Stacking and twisting graphene unlocks a rare form of magnetism
Stacking monolayer and bilayer graphene sheets with a twist leads to new collective electronic states, including a rare form of magnetism. Credit: Columbia University

Since the discovery of graphene more than 15 years ago, researchers have been in a global race to unlock its unique properties. Not only is graphene—a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon arranged in a hexagonal lattice—the strongest, thinnest material known to man, it is also an excellent conductor of heat and electricity.


Now, a team of researchers at Columbia University and the University of Washington has discovered that a variety of exotic electronic states, including a rare form of magnetism, can arise in a three-layer graphene structure.

The findings appear in an article published Oct. 12 in Nature Physics.

The work was inspired by recent studies of twisted monolayers or twisted bilayers of graphene, comprising either two or four total sheets. These materials were found to

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