Technology Standards, ‘Tech Debt’ Among Issues Media Will Face After An Unusual 2020

Technology development has sped up, rather than slowed down, during 2020, as the global coronavirus pandemic has led companies to quickly implement workflows they might have only imagined before having to deploy widespread remote operations.

At the same time, the scramble to move operations off-premises has pushed technologists to focus on next steps, including the need for standards that will apply across media supply chains and to govern media’s use of artificial intelligence among other things.

That, in a nutshell, captures a conversation among four technology leaders and a pair of rising stars that is set to take place Monday, Oct. 19, at 4 p.m. ET.

All six of the technologists participating in the “Predictions for 2021,” will have just received TVNewsCheck’s 2020 Women in Technology Awards in a presentation ceremony webcast live by TVNewsCheck.

Among their predictions:

  • Media companies that have scrambled to implement solutions to support
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Pixel 4A 5G is the unusual $500 phone that gives you 5G without skimping on the camera

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The $499 Pixel 4A 5G has the same cameras as its $699 Pixel 5 sibling. 


Screenshot by Sarah Tew/CNET

In a world where nearly every handset maker is selling a 5G phone, Google did something unusual: It made a less expensive 5G device that doesn’t compromise on the features consumers care about the most — especially the camera.  

The company’s new $499 Pixel 4A 5G, unveiled Wednesday, packs in the same superfast 5G connectivity as Google’s new $699 Pixel 5 flagship, as well as the same Qualcomm Snapdragon 765G processor, 128GB of storage and a fingerprint sensor on the back. Importantly, the camera setup is identical, with both phones sporting an 8-megapixel front-facing lens and two rear cameras: a standard 12.2-megapixel sensor and a 16-megapixel ultrawide camera. 

“Some people think that to get all the benefits of 5G at an affordable price, there needs to be a compromise on

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In unusual move, Justice Department asks Congress to limit Section 230 protections for tech firms

The U.S. Justice Department today sent Congress draft legislation intended to limit the scope of Section 230, a legal shield that gives online platforms immunity against certain types of lawsuits. 

Section 230 is a statute in the Communications Decency Act that protects companies such as Facebook Inc. from being held legally liable for user content. It allows tech firms to remove a post without the risk of being sued if they deem it to be “obscene, lewd, lascivious, filthy, excessively violent, harassing or otherwise objectionable.” Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have called for Section 230 to be revised amid a broader debate in Washington about social media.

The change proposed by the Justice Department today consists of several points. First, the draft legislation seeks to narrow the criteria that tech companies must meet to qualify for the Section 230 legal shield. Under the proposal, an online platform could

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