Cincinnati Based Gym Is First in The Nation to Use New Medical Grade Technology to Kill Viruses and Bacteria

CINCINNATI, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — A new gym based out of Cincinnati, OH is boosting client confidence for a return to the gym by utilizing a new medical grade UVGI technology that meets the CDC standard for killing viruses.  Tyler and Michelle Menke are a husband/wife duo that had a dream of opening a fitness business.  After years of research and analysis of other fitness franchises, last December they decided to take the leap and began making plans for the development of a gym concept that would incorporate their love of strength training and yoga. 

Then COVID hit…

After lots of sleepless nights, the Menke’s came to a decision to keep pursuing their dream.  Tyler, who quit his high paying medical device job to dedicate time to the gym, began making calls to old vendor contacts and found a left over UVGI system from the pop-up hospitals.  He

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Cells sacrifice themselves to boost immune response to viruses — ScienceDaily

Whether flu or coronavirus, it can take several days for the body to ramp up an effective response to a viral infection. New research appearing in the journal Nature Immunology describes how different cells in the immune system work together, communicate, and — in the case of cells called neutrophils — bring about their own death to help fight off infections. The findings could have important implications for the development of vaccines and anti-viral therapies.

“The immune system consists of several different types of cells, all acting in coordination,” said Minsoo Kim, Ph.D., a professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) and senior author of the study. “These findings show that cells called neutrophils play an important altruistic role that benefits other immune cells by providing key resources for their survival and, in the process, enhancing the body’s immune response against a virus.”

Neutrophils

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Understanding how viruses invade host cell protein-making machinery — ScienceDaily

Infectious viruses come in many shapes and sizes and use slightly different attack mechanisms to make humans and animals sick. But all viruses share something in common: They can only do damage by replicating inside the cells of another organism — their host.

This broad, fundamental process of how viruses trick host cells into making copies of the virus has had a team of Colorado State University scientists captivated for several years. A collaboration between the labs of Monfort Professor Tim Stasevich, in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and Associate Professor Brian Munsky, in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, is on a mission to understand, in visual detail and with mathematical precision, all aspects of viral attack strategies, including how viruses invade host cell protein-making machinery. Their work, supported by grants from the National Institute of General Medicine and the W. M. Keck Foundation, could provide

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