Watch: Visual surveillance technology – The Hindu

A video on how Visual surveillance technology that help users monitor and identify people is becoming popular within homes.

Visual surveillance technology refers to all those devices that help users monitor and identify people. It includes cameras and facial recognition systems.

Offices and large residential complexes have been using CCTV cameras to monitor people but today, cameras within homes are also becoming increasingly popular.

Households are installing both outdoor and indoor security cameras. While outdoor cameras are used to recognise and keep a watch on visitors and passers-by, indoor cameras help in monitoring activities in separate rooms like baby rooms or for the elderly.

These cameras help ensure safety and they allow households to keep track of activities both outside and inside the houses.

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First empirical study on how users pay visual attention to mobile app designs shows larger and brighter elements don’t catch our eyes after all — ScienceDaily

As part of an international collaboration, Aalto University researchers have shown that our common understanding of what attracts visual attention to screens, in fact, does not transfer to mobile applications. Despite the widespread use of mobile phones and tablets in our everyday lives, this is the first study to empirically test how users’ eyes follow commonly used mobile app elements.

Previous work on what attracts visual attention, or visual saliency, has centered on desktop and web-interfaces.

‘Apps appear differently on a phone than on a desktop computer or browser: they’re on a smaller screen which simply fits fewer elements and, instead of a horizontal view, mobile devices typically use a vertical layout. Until now it was unclear how these factors would affect how apps actually attract our eyes,’ explains Aalto University Professor Antti Oulasvirta.

In the study, the research team used a large set of representative mobile interfaces and eye

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Nvidia intros new Ampere GPUs for visual computing

Nvidia on Monday unveiled its latest batch of technology focused on the areas of graphics, AI, enterprise and edge computing, robotics, and remote collaboration. The company, which is holding its virtual GTC 2020 event this week, introduced the CloudXR on AWS platform, the Omniverse design and collaboration platform, and new Ampere GPUs for visual computing.

The RTX A6000 and the A40 are Nvidia’s latest GPU designs based on Ampere architecture. The RTX A6000 is designed for the new era of visual computing, Nvidia said. The GPU will replace the Turing version of the Quadro, while the A40 — which is a passive cooling version of the same card — is the successor to the RTX 6000 and RTX 8000 GPUs. 

Nvidia said the GPUs are targeted at visual compute use cases such as rendering and virtual workstations, with Nvidia AI and machine learning software running on the entire product line.

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Screen time can change visual perception — and that’s not necessarily bad — ScienceDaily

The coronavirus pandemic has shifted many of our interactions online, with Zoom video calls replacing in-person classes, work meetings, conferences and other events. Will all that screen time damage our vision?

Maybe not. It turns out that our visual perception is highly adaptable, according to research from Psychology Professor and Cognitive and Brain Sciences Coordinator Peter Gerhardstein’s lab at Binghamton University.

Gerhardstein, Daniel Hipp and Sara Olsen — his former doctoral students — will publish “Mind-Craft: Exploring the Effect of Digital Visual Experience on Changes in Orientation Sensitivity in Visual Contour Perception,” in an upcoming issue of the academic journal Perception. Hipp, the lead author and main originator of the research, is now at the VA Eastern Colorado Health Care System’s Laboratory for Clinical and Translational Research. Olsen, who designed stimuli for the research and aided in the analysis of the results, is now at the University of Minnesota’s

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The South China Morning Post reimagined visual storytelling to cover H

Following the passage of a bill that would allow extradition to mainland China in June 2019, a typically peaceful Hong Kong became the setting of massive pro-democracy protests. Plumes of smoke and tear gas obfuscated neon lights. Police clad in paramilitary gear clashed with protestors in T-shirts, shorts, and makeshift protective gear. The effect was a series of remarkable contrasts. “It was a story made to be told visually,” says Darren Long, head of graphics and magazine design for the South China Morning Post. And yet it was unlike any story his team had told before.

That story, the constant barrage of breaking news, also changed how Long’s team approached news coverage. SCMP’s visual coverage of the Hong Kong protests was incredibly robust, ranging from explainer infographics to in-depth timelines. But when you look at the scope of the SCMP’s graphics as a whole, they offer a

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