Army shutting down Asymmetric Warfare Group, Rapid Equipping Force

  • The Army announced this month that it’s deactivating Asymmetric Warfare Group and Rapid Equipment Force.
  • The groups were set up 15 years ago to provide advisory support and to rapidly equip soldiers to counter new threats during the post-9/11 wars.
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After nearly 15 years, the Asymmetric Warfare Group (AWG) and Rapid Equipment Force (REF) are being deactivated.

The primary mission of AWG was to provide advisory support to the US Army. It would do that by rapidly transferring current threat-based operations and solutions to tactical and operational commanders in order to defeat emerging asymmetric threats and enhance multi-domain effectiveness.

AWG was headquartered in Fort Meade, Maryland. It was the only unit within TRADOC with the capability and structure to globally engage warfighters and disseminate observations and information to the rear to enhance soldier survivability. AWG understood that it is vital for the Army

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Better detection of microwave radiation will improve thermal imaging, electronic warfare, radio communications — ScienceDaily

Army-funded research developed a new microwave radiation sensor with 100,000 times higher sensitivity than currently available commercial sensors. Researchers said better detection of microwave radiation will enable improved thermal imaging, electronic warfare, radio communications and radar.

Researchers published their study in the peer-reviewed journal Nature. The team includes scientists from Harvard University, The Institute of Photonic Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, and Raytheon BBN Technologies. The Army, in part, funded the work to fabricate this bolometer by exploiting the giant thermal response of graphene to microwave radiation.

“The microwave bolometer developed under this project is so sensitive that it is capable of detecting a single microwave photon, which is the smallest amount of energy in nature,” said Dr. Joe Qiu, program manager for solid-state electronics and electromagnetics, Army Research Office, an element of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory.

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Tachyum CEO Talks About How Technology is Changing Modern Warfare at GLOBSEC 2020 Bratislava Forum

Dr. Radoslav Danilak, co-founder and CEO of Tachyum Inc., has been invited to speak to an audience of influential heads of state, business leaders, innovators and industry experts about the role of technology in warfare at the GLOBSEC 2020 Bratislava Forum October 7-8.

Over the past two decades, GLOBSEC Bratislava Forum has established itself as the leading platform in the Central Eastern Europe region and one of the top strategic conferences globally. The Forum facilitates free exchange of ideas and provides a meeting place for stakeholders from all sectors of society to actively shape the future for generations to come. The two-day GLOBSEC 2020 Bratislava Forum, under the theme “Let’s Heal the World Together,” will provide a platform for discussing what shape the rebuilding of the post-pandemic world could have.

Danilak has nearly 30 years of industry experience and more than 100 patents designing state-of-the-art processing systems. In 2016,

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Modern Warfare’ And ‘Warzone’ In Season 6

Season 6 of Modern Warfare and Warzone is almost upon us. You have hours—not days—to wrap up the Season 5 Battle Pass.

Season 6 could be the last season for Call Of Duty: Modern Warfare before the launch of Call Of Duty: Black Ops, but Warzone will keep on going strong with a new Black Ops coat of paint. It’s also possible that we’ll get one more Modern Warfare season and that Cold War’s first season won’t start until weeks after the game’s launch, a scenario that I would prefer. Then again, I still think Cold War should have been pushed back to 2021.

We shall see.

For now,

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Meet Project Convergence 2020: How the U.S. Army Is Perfecting Future High-Tech Warfare

The U.S. military recently carried out an air-ground live-fire operation, connecting drones, computer systems, helicopters, armored combat vehicles and artillery weapons to one another in real time. This networked warfare allowed them to find, track and destroy enemy air defenses, infantry carriers and tanks all in a matter of seconds. 

The coordinated attacks were done at Yuma Proving Grounds, Ariz., during Project Convergence 2020, a combat exercise intended to conduct AI and network-enabled attack operations in preparation for high-speed, high-risk major power warfare. 

There were many elements to the networking connectivity, including cloud-based computer systems and satellites, yet the majority of the data exchanges between weapons platforms was done using software programmable radios. These single-channel commercial devices, Army engineers explain, were woven into the sensor systems of every platform to create a common, interoperable information exchange pipeline. 

Targeting data traveled through a specific progression and sequence, often going from forward-operating

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Inside the Army’s Fearless, Messy, Networked Warfare Experiment

YUMA PROVING GROUND, Arizona—In the 105-degree heat of the southern Arizona desert, the Army has linked together experimental drones, super guns, ground robots and satellites in a massive test of its future warfare plans. 

On Wednesday, the service mounted the first demonstration of Project Convergence, bringing in some 34 fresh-out-of-the-lab technologies. The goal: to show that these weapons and tools—linked and led by artificial intelligence—can allow humans to find a target, designate it as such, and strike it — from the air, from kilometers away, using any available weapon and in a fraction of the time it takes to execute that kill today. It was an ambitious test that revealed how far Army leaders have come in their goal of networked warfare across the domains of air, land, space and cyberspace. It also provided a vivid picture of how much further the Army has to go.

The scenarios involved different

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