It’s Time For Startups To Use AI To Battle Tech Giants In Patent Wars

Technology giants such as Alibaba and IBM are eating startup innovators’ lunch. These behemoths are seeking to devour even more market share by publishing patents at unprecedented speed in emerging technologies such as blockchain.

As some of the richest companies on the planet, the corporations have the resources to manage the laborious search of existing patents and to overcome the outdated administrative hurdles so that they can file for intellectual property rights.

Patents are definitely old school. Patent laws started with the rise of the nation-state, so they began in the 18th century and were then fully developed in the 19th century. Some changes may have been made to reflect new technologies, but the basic patent laws haven’t evolved to meet the needs of the 21st century.

We’re patenting ideas based on today’s high-tech of artificial intelligence and blockchain with laws that were established centuries ago.

All this puts early-growth

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Star Wars: Squadrons is seeing significant VR play

EA released an infographic on Twitter that shows 15% of Star Wars: Squadrons players are experiencing the game in VR. That’s actually quite a lot, considering it’s available on PS4, PC, and Xbox One and is fully playable with or without VR.

After playing and reviewing Star Wars: Squadrons (I loved it by the way). Playing in VR with a HOTAS control stick is the best and most immersive way to enjoy this game. The implied stat here, if you read between the numbers, is that 85% of players haven’t gotten the full experience.

It’s also worth noting that when they ran the numbers to get this data, the total player count includes Xbox One users who don’t even have a VR option on their console. That means, of the total potential VR userbase, more than 15% have played in VR. For a game that’s only a week old, it’s

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Why the Army Is Doubling Down on Drones to Win Future Wars

The Army’s use of manned-unmanned teaming, wherein human operators control air and ground robotic vehicles to conduct reconnaissance, carry supplies or even launch attacks has long been underway. This developmental trajectory is demonstrated by the Army’s most recent successes with unmanned-unmanned teaming. 

Progress with drone to drone connectivity, from ground to ground and ground to air is fast gaining momentum following successful recent experiments where the Army passed key targeting data from larger drones to smaller mini-drones in the air. This happened in September at Yuma Proving Grounds, Ariz., during the Army’s Project Convergence experiment, wherein the ability to massively shorten sensor-to-shooter time and network time-sensitive combat information was demonstrated between drones. 

During the experiment, an Army Gray Eagle drone networked with a forward operating mini-drone called Air Launched Effects. This, as Army leaders described, extended the range, scope and target envelope for attack missions well beyond “line of sight”

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Console wars still can’t compete with PC gaming

Tech giants like Sony and Microsoft may have taken centre stage this year, but the PC looks ready to remain a frontrunner among gamers.

In the long-term, console gaming will struggle to compete with PC gaming.

The ‘console wars’ of 2020 have provided something of distraction from the woes of the world, as gaming giants Microsoft and Sony teased out the various specs and highlights of their new platforms, competing against one another in being at the front of the rapid shift toward a new era of gaming – one that promises near-instantaneous speed, versatility, quality, and more power than we have ever been able to hold in our hands before.

The Xbox Series X and the PlayStation 5 both promise to revolutionise gaming, allowing for the players to mould and tailor their gaming experiences to suit whatever type of experience they are interested in. Already the results have

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Spotify is leaning on influencers to win the podcasting wars

Spotify has made its intentions clear: It wants to be the largest audio platform in the world—not just music, audio.

Exclusive podcast partnerships have been a significant part of that effort, and while deals with the likes of the Obamas and Joe Rogan have received most of the attention (and controversy), less celebrated but no less important are Spotify’s wooing of influencers to podcast and to do so using Spotify’s tools and distribution.

“In order for us to continue our growth and our trajectory, we knew we wanted to broaden out what being an audio network really means,” said Dawn Ostroff, Spotify’s chief content officer, at Fast Company’s 6th annual Innovation Festival. “And podcasting, which is the fastest growing medium right now particularly among young people, was the natural next step.”

Over the past several months, Spotify has struck deals with influencers, including Rickey Thompson, Denzel Dion, Addison Rae, and

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Best HOTAS Flight Stick For Use With Star Wars Squadrons And Microsoft Flight Simulator

The one-two punch of Star Wars: Squadrons and Microsoft Flight Simulator are making flight sticks a surprisingly hot market in 2020. HOTAS controllers on both PC and consoles are selling out, including the Thrustmaster Warthog stick-and-throttle combo. Some controllers are available through preorders or backorders, though, so if you’re okay with waiting for your new flight controller, that’s definitely a good option.

Thankfully, Star Wars Squadrons creative director Ian S. Frazier has said the Star Wars flight game should work with “any” HOTAS setup. However, it can still be hard to find a quality flight stick and even harder to find one that you can put your money down on. That’s why we’ve collected the best flight sticks you can order right now. We’ve also curated a selection of gaming headsets that feature excellent audio quality for better immersion as well as comfortable headbands and ear pads.

Also, if

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Trump uses TikTok and WeChat to challenge China. Welcome to a new conflict: The app wars.

The recent announcement that the Trump administration was planning to ban two extremely popular Chinese-made apps, TikTok and WeChat, were the first volleys in a new kind of conflict between superpowers. In essence, we are seeing the beginning of a revamped “Great Game,” a term that was originally coined in the 19th century but expanded in the 1990s to include superpower rivalries over commodity-rich land in Central Asia. Apps are the next battleground, and information about users is the latest commodity that everyone wants to control.

Beyond the actual data, the Trump administration could well be worried that social networking algorithms could be used to try to sway public opinion on important political issues.

When direct military conflicts between superpowers become too deadly, the rivalries typically move into other arenas — political or economic. With China ascending to superpower status both economically and militarily, tensions are on the rise. The

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