Norwegian Group Katapult Ocean Invests in ecoSPEARS Environmental Startup With NASA Clean Water Technology

ORLANDO, Fla., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — ecoSPEARS understands that toxins are polluting land and waterways. When these contaminants remain in the environment, they can cause congenital disorders and diseases to animals and people.ecoSPEARS develops climate-friendly technology solutions to remove the toxins from the environment, so everyone has access to clean water, clean food, and clean air. 

In the selection process, Katapult Ocean screened and interviewed a pipeline with more than 1,500 startups. Since 2018, Katapult Ocean has made 32 investments in exciting ocean impact companies from all over the world (17 countries and four continents). “Few options exist when it comes to eliminating persistent and emerging contaminants in soil, sediment, and oil – a problem which has grown with industry globally. ecoSPEARS is well-positioned to become the benchmark cleantech company for green remediation,” said Jonas Skattum Svegaarden, CEO of Katapult Ocean. 

ecoSPEARS imagines a world where every

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Apple Wins Patent for Ultrasonic Wave Technology that accepts Touch Commands Under Water

 

Today Apple was granted a patent titled “Ultrasonic touch detection through display” Apple’s granted patent relates to system architectures, apparatus and methods for acoustic touch detection and exemplary applications of the system architectures, apparatus and methods. The technology will allow touch commands on an iDevice under water and more. 

 

 Apple notes in their patent filing that the position of an object touching a surface can be determined using time of flight (TOF) bounding box techniques, acoustic image reconstruction techniques, acoustic tomography techniques, attenuation of reflections from an array of barriers, or a two-dimensional piezoelectric receiving array, for example.

 

Acoustic touch sensing can utilize transducers, such as piezoelectric transducers, to transmit ultrasonic waves along a surface and/or through the thickness of an electronic device to the surface.

 

As the ultrasonic wave propagates, one or more objects (e.g., fingers, styli – Apple Pencil) in contact with the surface can interact with the

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Water has become a big issue for Big Tech. But Microsoft has a plan

When Brian Janous started at Microsoft in 2011 as a data center utility architect, he joined at a time when energy and sustainability issues were still nascent.

“I was the first person that was brought into the organization to work on energy and sustainability issues. This was back in the time when it … certainly wasn’t clear to me why a company like Microsoft even needed someone like me,” Janous told CNBC by phone.

“And the person that was hiring me, (said), ‘I really think this whole cloud thing is going to be a big deal. And I think energy is going to be really important to the future of our company.’ And he was clearly correct. Obviously, over the last several years, as the cloud has really exploded, energy and our environmental footprints have become increasingly important issues,” he added.

The U.S. government estimated that data centers in the

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Scientists develop new land surface model to monitor global river water environment

yangtze river
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Climate change and human activities, including heat emission, nitrogen (N) emission and water management, are altering the hydrothermal condition and N transport in the soil and river systems, thereby affecting the global nitrogen cycle and water environment.


“We need to assess the impacts of these human activities on global river temperature and riverine N transport,” said Prof. Xie Zhenghui from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. “Quantitative assessment can not only improve our understanding of the material and energy cycle that occur in response to anthropogenic disturbances, but also contribute to protecting river ecosystems.”

Xie and his collaborators from the Chinese Academy of Sciences incorporated the schemes of riverine dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) transport, river water temperature, and human activity into a land surface model, and thus developed a land surface model CAS-LSM. They applied the model to explore the impacts

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Scientists develop new tool to forecast drought and water flow in the Colorado river — ScienceDaily

A team of scientists at Utah State University has developed a new tool to forecast drought and water flow in the Colorado River several years in advance. Although the river’s headwaters are in landlocked Wyoming and Colorado, water levels are linked to sea surface temperatures in parts of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and the water’s long-term ocean memory. The group’s paper, “Colorado River water supply is predictable on multi-year timescales owning to long-term ocean memory” was published October 9 by Communications Earth and Environment, an open-access journal from Nature Research.

The Colorado River is the most important water resource in the semi-arid western United States and faces growing demand from users in California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah. Because water shortages in the Colorado River impact energy production, food and drinking water security, forestry and tourism, tools to predict drought and low water levels could inform management

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Data tool helps users manage water resources, protect infrastructure — ScienceDaily

River systems are essential resources for everything from drinking water supply to power generation — but these systems are also hydrologically complex, and it is not always clear how water flow data from various monitoring points relates to any specific piece of infrastructure. Researchers from Cornell University and North Carolina State University have now developed a tool that draws from multiple databases to give water resource managers and infrastructure users the information they need to make informed decisions about water use on river networks.

“A streamgage tells you what the water level is at a specific point in the river — but that’s not really enough information,” says Sankar Arumugam, co-author of a paper on the work and a professor of civil engineering at NC State. “If you are an infrastructure operator, what you really need to know is how long it will take for that water-level information to be

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Asteroid Bennu may have been home to ancient water flows

Perhaps as a prelude to this attempt, researchers just published a number of new studies about the geochemistry of Bennu today in the journals Science and Science Advances, providing some of the biggest revelations to date. Here are the most compelling.

Bennu’s watery history

In the first Science study, scientists used high-resolution images taken by OSIRIS-Rex, as well as spectroscopy (which involves analyzing electromagnetic waves emitted from Bennu to determine its chemistry), to better understand the composition and history of the asteroid’s Nightingale crater region, where the sample will be collected.

They found that boulders in this area showed bright veins, narrow in width but about a meter in length, similar to what’s found in other carbonaceous chondritic meteorites that have landed on Earth. In those cases, the veins indicate that the rock had once interacted with flowing water. 

So naturally, for Bennu, “the veins suggest that water flowed through

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Polar ice, atmospheric water vapor biggest drivers of variation among climate models — ScienceDaily

A Florida State University researcher is part of a team that has found varying projections on global warming trends put forth by climate change scientists can be explained by differing models’ predictions regarding ice loss and atmospheric water vapor.

The work will help climate scientists reconcile various models to improve their accuracy, said Florida State University Meteorology Professor Ming Cai, one of the authors of the study published in Nature Communications .

Climate scientists agree that the Earth’s surface temperature is warming, but the details of exactly where and by how much are less clear. A worst-case climate change scenario (known as the “Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5”) predicted a likely increase in average global temperatures of about 2.6 degrees Celsius to 4.8 degrees Celsius (or about 4.7 degrees Fahrenheit to 8.6 degrees Fahrenheit) by 2100.

“This uncertainty limits our ability to foresee the severity of the global warming impacts on

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Technology will be key to guarantee access to water in the post-pandemic world

VALENCIA, Spain, Oct. 6, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Technology will be critical to ensure water supply in emerging countries around the world in the aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic, explained Chema Nebot, Head of Business Development at Spanish Water technology company Idrica.

Nebot, who is one of the leading experts in integral water cycle management technology in Europe, explained that to strengthen the access of the most vulnerable societies to water resources it is going to be necessary and urgent to implement technologies such as digital twin and smart meters in the developing world.

Processes optimisation and automation will boost energy efficiency in the water industry, and countries must bet on the future of the access to water to avoid social conflict.

“The world of tomorrow will rely on good management of water resources across the world. The success of that effort depends largely on the state of

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