Athletes And Staff Get Wearables To Ensure Social Distancing

Each year, thousands of elite and amateur runners compete in the London Marathon. Last year, 42,000 people completed the 26.2-mile course that spans across the British capital, with thousands of people lining the streets to lend their support.

The marathon is an opportunity to achieve personal goals and raise millions of dollars for charitable causes.

But running a mass participation event in the era of Coronavirus is impossible and marathons across the globe have been canceled or postponed, much to the disappointment of those who had spent months training and fundraising for their big day in the limelight.

London Marathon

London hopes things will return to normal for the 2021 event but in the meantime, the 40th staging of the event will take place in a secure bubble in St James Park. Just 100 elite athletes will compete in the men’s, women’s and wheelchair races,

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The next generation of wearables will be a privacy minefield

But if you’re among those who believe Facebook already knows too much about our lives, you’re probably more than slightly disturbed by the idea of Facebook having a semi-permanent presence on your actual face

Facebook says that researchers who wear the Project Aria glasses will be easily identifiable and undergo special training.

Facebook

Facebook, to its credit, is aware of this. The company published a lengthy blog post on all the ways it’s taking privacy into consideration. For example, it says workers who wear the glasses will be easily identifiable and will be trained in “appropriate use.” The company will also encrypt data and blur faces and license plates. It promises the data it collects “will not be used to inform the ads people see across Facebook’s apps,” and only approved researchers will be able to access it. 

But none of that addresses how Facebook intends to use this data or what type of “research” it will be used for. Yes, it will further the social network’s

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