U.S. government appeals judge’s ruling to block WeChat app store ban

By David Shepardson

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Justice Department on Friday said it was appealing a judge’s decision to block the government from barring Apple Inc <AAPL.O> and Alphabet Inc’s <GOOGL.O> Google from offering Chinese-owned messaging app WeChat for download in U.S. app stores.

The government said it was appealing the Sept. 19 preliminary junction issued by U.S. Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The injunction blocked the U.S. Commerce Department order, which would also bar other U.S. transactions with Tencent Holding’s <0700.HK> WeChat, potentially making the app unusable in the United States.

A U.S. spokesman for Tencent did not immediately comment.

The Justice Department said earlier that Beeler’s order was in error and “permits the continued, unfettered use of WeChat, a mobile application that the Executive Branch has determined constitutes a threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United

Read More
Read More

U.S. appeals judge’s ruling to block WeChat app store ban

FILE PHOTO: The messenger app WeChat is seen among U.S. flags in this illustration picture taken Aug. 7, 2020. REUTERS/Florence Lo/Illustration/File Photo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Justice Department on Friday said it was appealing a judge’s decision to block the government from barring Apple Inc AAPL.O and Alphabet Inc’s GOOGL.O Google from offering Chinese-owned messaging app WeChat for download in U.S. app stores.

The government said it was appealing to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals the Sept. 19 preliminary junction issued by U.S. Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler. The injunction blocked the U.S. Commerce Department order, which would also bar other U.S. transactions with Tencent Holding’s 0700.HK WeChat, potentially making the app unusable in the United States.

A U.S. spokesman for Tencent did not immediately comment.

The Justice Department said earlier that Beeler’s order was in error and “permits the continued, unfettered use of WeChat, a mobile application

Read More
Read More

WeChat sets the record straight for its 690,000 Aussie users

wechat.jpg

The Select Committee on Foreign Interference through Social Media has been tasked with probing the risk posed to the nation’s democracy by foreign interference through social media.

Twitter, Google, Tiktok, and Facebook have previously made submissions to the inquiry, with the plan for representatives from each of the social media platforms to eventually face the committee.

TikTok was probed on Friday, using its time to clarify data protection rules, its plans to prevent distressing videos from being viewed on its platform, and how it wasn’t asked to provide assistance to a government investigation, among other things. Facebook was due to appear alongside TikTok, but blamed a scheduling issue for pulling out.

The latest submission [PDF] to the committee as part of its inquiry comes from the Middle Kingdom, by way of popular chat app WeChat.

WeChat is owned and operated by WeChat International Pte Ltd, an entity incorporated in Singapore.

Read More
Read More

TikTok, WeChat Security Threat Has Yet to Be Proven, Judges Say

(Bloomberg) — Two federal judges have ruled this month that the Trump administration failed to prove Chinese-owned apps used by millions of Americans pose enough of a national security threat to justify a U.S. ban.



graphical user interface, application, chat or text message: TikTok Branding As Oracle Is Said to Win Deal For US Operations


© Bloomberg
TikTok Branding As Oracle Is Said to Win Deal For US Operations

U.S. District Judge Carl Nichols in Washington said in a court filing Monday that he blocked a ban on new downloads of ByteDance Ltd.’s TikTok because the government has likely overstepped its authority under the emergency-powers law it invoked to justify the prohibition. On Sept. 19, U.S. Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler in San Francisco blocked a similar ban on Tencent Holding Ltd.’s WeChat.

Loading...

Load Error

The court decisions show that, while judges may agree with the notion that China poses a threat, the administration hasn’t yet shown that the apps themselves are a problem. It’s at least a temporary setback for

Read More
Read More

Chevron tells staff to delete WeChat off phones following Trump ban

  • Chevron Corporation has told its employees around the world to delete Tencent’s WeChat app from their work phones, describing it as a “non-compliant application” in a staff email seen by Bloomberg News. 
  • Any staff that don’t delete the Chinese social media and chat app will have their access to Chevron’s internal system revoked, it said.  
  • The American oil giant is one of the first companies in the US to take the Trump administration’s ban of the social media and chat app on board. 
  • A federal judge blocked the US government from banning WeChat app downloads from Sunday, September 20. The US Commerce Department said it will challenge the order, and that the app poses a national security risk.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

US oil company Chevron has ordered staff worldwide to delete WeChat off their work phones, despite President Donald Trump’s ban on the app being blocked

Read More
Read More

Trump uses TikTok and WeChat to challenge China. Welcome to a new conflict: The app wars.

The recent announcement that the Trump administration was planning to ban two extremely popular Chinese-made apps, TikTok and WeChat, were the first volleys in a new kind of conflict between superpowers. In essence, we are seeing the beginning of a revamped “Great Game,” a term that was originally coined in the 19th century but expanded in the 1990s to include superpower rivalries over commodity-rich land in Central Asia. Apps are the next battleground, and information about users is the latest commodity that everyone wants to control.

Beyond the actual data, the Trump administration could well be worried that social networking algorithms could be used to try to sway public opinion on important political issues.

When direct military conflicts between superpowers become too deadly, the rivalries typically move into other arenas — political or economic. With China ascending to superpower status both economically and militarily, tensions are on the rise. The

Read More
Read More