Watching nature on TV can boost wellbeing — ScienceDaily

Watching high quality nature programmes on TV can uplift people’s moods, reduce negative emotions, and help alleviate the kind of boredom associated with being isolated indoors, according to a new study published today in the Journal of Environmental Psychology.

The research has also shown that experiencing nature in virtual reality could have even larger benefits, boosting positive feelings and increasing people’s connection to the natural world.

Under laboratory conditions, researchers from the University of Exeter first induced feelings of boredom in 96 participants by asking them to watch a video in which a person describes their work at an office supply company. They then experienced scenes of an underwater coral reef in one of three different ways: on TV; in a VR headset using 360o video; and in a VR headset using computer generated interactive graphics.

The team found that all viewing methods minimised negative feelings such as sadness,

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The COVID-19 Crisis Presents An Opportunity For Companies To Step Up Their Efforts In Ensuring The Safety and Well-Being Of Their Employees


6 min read

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You’re reading Entrepreneur Middle East, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media.

It is no surprise that the COVID-19 crisis has gravely affected the mental health and well-being of employees. Business priorities and goals all over the world have drastically changed, with key challenges being to keep the business afloat, as well as manage the safety and security of employees.

The social distancing measures implemented by governments within the Middle East region have made people more isolated and uncertain. Homes have turned into offices, playgrounds, gyms, and schools, and changes due to health threats and job losses are not helping to make the situation better. Moreover, in the fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) industry, our frontliners had to leave the safety of their homes, and make sure that the food is produced and displayed on the shelves of

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Smartphone reveals how spiritual texts can promote well-being : The Tribune India

New York, October 4

Smartphones not only reveal your screen time, chat history or gaming preferences but are a useful tool to find a link between individuals’ daily spiritual experiences and overall well-being, say, researchers.

While other studies have found such a connection between spirituality and positive emotions, the new study is significant because frequent texting over smartphones made it easier to capture respondents’ moment-to-moment spiritual experiences over 14 days rather than only one or two points in time.

Using smartphone check-ins twice a day for two weeks, researchers from Baylor University and Harvard University examined whether spirituality’s link with satisfaction is stable or momentary, “This study is unique because it examines daily spiritual experiences — such as feeling God’s presence, finding strength in religion or spirituality, and feeling inner peace and harmony — as both stable traits and as states that fluctuate,” said study co-author Matt Bradshaw, a research

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Smartphone surveys find a connection between daily spiritual experiences and well-being

spirituality
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Using smartphone check-ins twice a day for two weeks, sociologists in a national study have found a link between individuals’ daily spiritual experiences and overall well-being, say researchers from Baylor University and Harvard University.

While other studies have found such a connection between spirituality and positive emotions, the new study is significant because frequent texting made it easier to capture respondents’ moment-to-moment spiritual experiences over 14 days rather than only one or two points in time, they say.

“This study is unique because it examines daily spiritual experiences—such as feeling God’s presence, finding strength in religion or spirituality, and feeling inner peace and harmony—as both stable traits and as states that fluctuate,” said study co-author Matt Bradshaw, Ph.D., research professor of sociology at Baylor University Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR).

“Because surveys usually capture only one or two points in time, researchers often have to

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Virtual events explore science of well-being, feature new insights from Dalai Lama

“The World We Make 2020” is a weeklong series of free virtual events to share the latest science, well-being tips and the opportunity to hear from mental health experts and leaders, including a recorded dialogue with His Holiness the Dalai Lama (left) and Center for Healthy Minds founder Richard Davidson (on monitor). Center for Healthy Minds

In this moment of stress from the COVID-19 pandemic, racial and civil unrest, and environmental disasters, many are calling for a reimagining of personal and public life that is more just, health-promoting and sustainable.

At the University of Wisconsin–Madison’s Center for Healthy Minds, researchers continue to pursue the science of well-being, sharing knowledge and guidance to help people manage their stress and emotional health during times of hardship.

That’s why the center, along with its external, affiliated nonprofit Healthy Minds Innovations, is offering a weeklong series of free virtual events to share the latest

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A leading Silicon Valley exec says Big Tech prioritized lower costs over employees’ wellbeing, and it’s created a feudalist system where workers are left to fend for themselves



a man riding on the back of a truck: Sean Gallup/Getty Images


© Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

  • Maëlle Gavet is a leading Silicon Valley executive, entrepreneur, investor, and most recently, the chief operating officer at real estate platform Compass.
  • The following is an excerpt from her first book, “Trampled by Unicorns: Big Tech’s Empathy Problem and How to Fix It.”
  • In it, she examines how Big Tech’s failure to empathize with customers and workers has led to “digital era’s equivalent of feudalism.”
  • In her in-depth critique of the world’s largest tech corporations — including Amazon, Uber, and Google — she crafts an earnest call to action for industry leaders, board members, employees, and consumers to get tech back on track. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Right now the jury is still out on whether the tech economy is ultimately a job creator or a job destroyer. As with many of the points in this book, that topic is

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