Freed whale calf seen feasting on bunker fish off Montauk

The humpback calf whose tail was anchored to the bottom of the Atlantic off Jones Beach State Park for at least four days until a herculean rescue freed him from two tons of fishing gear is surviving — and, while not swimming normally, has been feasting on bunker fish off Montauk.

“It’s really great news; sometimes we can go for weeks, we can go for years, before we understand the fate of disentangled whale,” one of his lead rescuers, Scott Landry, director of the marine animal entanglement response team at the Center for Coastal Studies, a Provincetown, Massachusetts-based nonprofit, said by telephone.

The 4-year-old was seen swimming and identified on Aug. 19 and 22 by Arthur Kopelman, president, the Coastal Research & Education Society of Long Island, of West Sayville.

That was about three weeks after Landry, part of a multiagency team, succeeded in what he termed one of the

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Traders say the Softbank ‘whale’ may be back as options activity spikes for Big Tech stocks

Wall Street traders said that an unusual spike in call options on Thursday shows that Japan’s Softbank may once again be betting on large tech stocks, CNBC’s David Faber reports. 

Multiple sources told Faber that there was $200 million spent on Thursday morning on call options for Netflix, Amazon, Facebook and Alphabet, with the investment bank being the most likely buyer. 

“A number of sources in the derivative markets on major trading markets noting that significant call buying, and they all point to Softbank as being behind it,” Faber said on “Squawk on the Street.” 

Reports by the Financial Times, Wall Street Journal and other outlets identified Softbank as the Nasdaq “whale” whose massive options activity led to a boom for major tech stocks in August. The news led to a sell-off in Softbank’s stock in early September as investors worried about the new strategy for the bank and its

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Australia says majority of 470-strong beached whale pod has died

By Byron Kaye

SYDNEY (Reuters) – The majority of a 470-strong pod of pilot whales found stranded off Australia’s remote southern coast has died, officials said on Wednesday, as rescuers struggled in freezing waters and fading light to free those still alive.

The group, which is the biggest beaching in the country’s modern history, were first spotted a wide sandbank during an aerial reconnaissance of rugged Macquarie Harbour in Tasmania state on Monday.

After two days of a difficult and dangerous rescue attempt, state marine scientists said at least 380 of the long-finned pilot whales had died.

By late Wednesday, around fifty of the mammals were freed but experts said there was a high likelihood they would return as many did during the rescue attempt a day earlier, creating an exhausting loop for rescuers who cannot work through the night.

The outlook for the remaining 30 stranded and still alive

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Record-Breaking Whale Stays Underwater for Mind-Bending 3 Hours and 42 Minutes

A Cuvier’s beaked whale (not the same individual described in the new study).

A Cuvier’s beaked whale (not the same individual described in the new study).
Image: NOAA

Marine biologists are astonished after a Cuvier’s beaked whale held its breath for nearly four hours during a deep dive. The unexpected observation shows there’s much to learn about these medium-sized whales.

Scientists from Duke University and the Cascadia Research Collective recorded the unbelievable dive during field observations off the coast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, in 2017. In the first of two epic dives, the Cuvier beaked whale, wearing tag ZcTag066, stayed underwater for nearly three hours. A week later, the whale outdid itself, holding its breath for a bewildering three hours and 42 minutes.

“We didn’t believe it at first, because these are mammals after all, and any mammal spending that long underwater just seemed incredible,” Nicola Quick, the lead author of the new study and a biologist at Duke University, said

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Australia Says Majority of 470-Strong Beached Whale Pod Has Died | World News

SYDNEY (Reuters) – The majority of a 470-strong pod of pilot whales found stranded off Australia’s remote southern coast has died, officials said on Wednesday, as rescuers struggled in freezing waters and fading light to free those still alive.

The group, which is the biggest beaching in the country’s modern history, were first spotted a wide sandbank during an aerial reconnaissance of rugged Macquarie Harbour in Tasmania state on Monday.

After two days of a difficult and dangerous rescue attempt, state marine scientists said at least 380 of the long-finned pilot whales had died.

By late Wednesday, around fifty of the mammals were freed but experts said there was a high likelihood they would return as many did during the rescue attempt a day earlier, creating an exhausting loop for rescuers who cannot work through the night.

The outlook for the remaining 30 stranded and still alive pilot whales, a

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Whale beaching: An enduring mystery

By Paulina Duran

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Rescuers are trying to free a pod of long-finned pilot whales stranded off the Australian island of Tasmania. Around 470 whales are in the pod, more than half of which have already died, in one of the world’s biggest beachings.

WHY DO WHALES BEACH THEMSELVES?

It’s the question that has puzzled marine biologists for years, and continues to do so. Mass whale strandings have occurred throughout recorded modern history, and likely earlier.

“Strandings around the world are complete mysteries,” said Vanessa Pirotta, a Sydney-based wildlife scientist.

While scientists don’t know the exact reason, they do know that whales – and dolphins, which are also prone to mass beaching – are very sociable animals. They travel together in pods, often following a leader, and are known to gather around injured or distressed whales.

“There are many different factors that can cause a stranding,” said Australian

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