What’s the best way to get out the vote in a pandemic?

<span class="caption">Virtual neighborhood meetings, like this Democratic effort in Reedsburg, Wis., are among the latest efforts to get people to vote.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://newsroom.ap.org/detail/Election2020GroundGame/1ea10d7a31db4be3a7353a3d5df3beb7/photo" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:AP Photo/Tom Beaumont">AP Photo/Tom Beaumont</a></span>
Virtual neighborhood meetings, like this Democratic effort in Reedsburg, Wis., are among the latest efforts to get people to vote. AP Photo/Tom Beaumont

Identifying supporters and getting them to the polls are key parts of any political campaign. The pandemic, however, creates new challenges for candidates trying to convey their messages and mobilize voters.

Decades of political science research have made clear that mobilizing in person, either on the doorstep or on the phone, is the most effective way of moving voters to the polls. A well-run door-to-door campaign can be expected to increase turnout by 7 to 9 percentage points; an effective phone campaign can be expected to lead to a 3% to 5% increase in voter turnout.

However, even before the pandemic, it was getting harder and harder to reach voters in person or on the phone. When I began studying voter mobilization in 2005, it was common

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What’s the tech behind Question 1?

The initiative is aimed at rectifying a loophole in the original Right To Repair measure, passed eight years ago, which required automakers to sell to independent repair shops in Massachusetts the same digital diagnostic tools and software they provide to their own dealerships.

Now, drive a Ford or a Toyota or a Mercedes into pretty much any repair shop, not just here in Massachusetts but across the country, and a mechanic can plug into the vehicle and talk to all of its onboard computers.

But the carmakers stopped short of providing those mechanics with remote access to the data your car can transmit wirelessly, a huge convenience for vehicle owners, who don’t have to first drive to the repair shop to have a problem diagnosed. A large and growing number of vehicles are capable of this — GM cars equipped with the company’s OnStar system, for instance.

“This is like

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What’s The Secret To Happiness? Borgo Egnazia In Italy Has Some Answers

Soon after I learned about the Happiness Break at Borgo Egnazia—one of my favorite resorts in Italy, and in fact in the world—I booked a trip to Puglia. This is 2020, after all, and we could all use some help with happiness.

I was also intrigued by the premise. Plenty of spas promise wellness. Not so many emphasize happiness as a skill and a practice that can be developed and nurtured. But here was a place that was touting its bona fides in the science of happiness.

And while I love a good boot camp, detox or jump-start-style health retreat, I also liked the idea of a program that would be adding to my life, not taking anything away. After two months of confinement this spring, I wasn’t particularly interested in cutting anything else out of my life.

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Skoda develop a smartphone app that identifies what’s wrong with your car by listening to the engine



a person driving a car: MailOnline logo


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Skoda has developed new technology it believes will make car mechanics’ lives easier – or possible make them redundant entirely.

The Czech brand – which sits under VW Group’s ownership – says it has completed successful trials of a smartphone app that can listen to any thuds, bangs or clatter produced by a vehicle and diagnose the problem from the sound alone.

Called the Skoda Sound Analyser, the manufacturer says it has a 90 per cent success rate of identifying issues with cars correctly.



a hand holding a small camera: Smart-phone app for car mechanics: Skoda has developed an application that listens to a car's engine noise to identify if it has an underlying issue that needs to be fixed by a technician


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Smart-phone app for car mechanics: Skoda has developed an application that listens to a car’s engine noise to identify if it has an underlying issue that needs to be fixed by a technician

Skoda has developed the system in house to be used by technicians in its franchised servicing departments to quickly

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Here’s what’s happening Wednesday with COVID-19 in the Chicago area

Illinois health officials Tuesday announced 1,617 new known cases of COVID-19 and 32 additional confirmed fatalities, bringing the total number of known infections in Illinois to 305,011 and the statewide death toll to 8,836 since the start of the pandemic.



a group of people sitting at a table with a bunch of stuffed animals: Mourners add to a memorial on Sept. 9, 2020, during a vigil in memory of Dajore Wilson, 8, near where she was killed at 47th Street and South Union Avenue in the Canaryville neighborhood.


© Brian Cassella / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Mourners add to a memorial on Sept. 9, 2020, during a vigil in memory of Dajore Wilson, 8, near where she was killed at 47th Street and South Union Avenue in the Canaryville neighborhood.

Officials reported 49,513 new tests in the last 24 hours. The seven-day statewide positivity rate is 3.4%.



a traffic light at night: The setting sun is is seen along East Madison Street before the fall equinox on Sept. 21, 2020, in Chicago.


© Armando L. Sanchez / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
The setting sun is is seen along East Madison Street before the fall equinox on Sept. 21, 2020, in Chicago.

Earlier Tuesday, city officials said Indiana again is in danger of being added to Chicago’s quarantine travel order next week. While the neighboring state

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The DeanBeat: What’s at stake in Apple’s potentially apocalyptic IDFA changes

The Identifier for Advertisers, also known as IDFA, seems like an unlikely candidate for causing an apocalypse in mobile games, advertising, and the iPhone ecosystem. But the obscure tracking technology, which anonymously profiles a user, seems like Death riding in on a pale horse.

Starting in June, Apple caused a stir by saying it was effectively getting rid of the IDFA, making it harder for advertisers to target consumers with ads. Apple’s plan was to enhance privacy, but it caused a great stir among the likes of Facebook, mobile marketers, and their customers such as game developers. Apple did this without widespread consultation with the app and game industry.

By getting rid of the IDFA, Apple could make its platform more attractive to those who value privacy, consistent with the latest privacy-marketing ads for its iPhones and iPad. But the uproar from Apple’s partners forced Apple to delay its move

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What’s top of mind for the DNC’s chief technology officer?

With help from Eric Geller, John Hendel, Nancy Scola and Carmen Paun

Editor’s Note: Morning Tech is a free version of POLITICO Pro Technology’s morning newsletter, which is delivered to our subscribers each morning at 6 a.m. The POLITICO Pro platform combines the news you need with tools you can use to take action on the day’s biggest stories.Act on the news with POLITICO Pro.

PROGRAMMING NOTE: Morning Tech will not publish Monday, Oct. 12. We’ll return to our normal schedule on Tuesday, Oct. 13. In the meantime, please continue to follow Pro Technology.

— DNC CTO talks disinformation: The DNC’s chief technology officer said the party is seeing as much disinformation from domestic sources as from foreign ones, which she called “deeply troubling.”

— Meanwhile, on the RNC: The Trump campaign and Republican National Committee are sourcing Americans’ answers on whether social media companies “are trying to help Joe

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Here’s what’s happening today at TC Sessions: Mobility 2020

Mobility enthusiasts from around the world, welcome to Day One of TC Sessions: Mobility 2020! Get ready for two days of programming dedicated to the people and technology behind the transformation of transportation.

Mobility’s a rapidly evolving revolution, and we’re thrilled to have the community’s best founders, investors and technologists standing by ready to help you build your startup, expand your portfolio or take your career to the next level.

Ready to get your mobility mojo moving? Here’s a brief taste of today’s events — speakers, interviews and breakout sessions. Visit the TC Sessions: Mobility agenda, plan your day and don’t forget about the world-class networking — we built time for it into the schedule. Opportunity’s pounding on the door…fling it open, people!

Timing is everything: Check the agenda for exact times. It will automatically reflect the time zone in which you’re currently located. Okay, let’s get to the good

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What’s this EXIF technology people used to study Trump photos?

An Oct. 3 photo shows President Donald Trump at Walter Reed hospital.

An Oct. 3 photo shows President Donald Trump at Walter Reed hospital.


White House
For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.

President Donald Trump’s case of COVID-19 gave an obscure photo data technology called EXIF its 15 minutes of internet fame as people started scrutinizing photos taken of him this weekend at Walter Reed hospital. But what exactly is EXIF?

In short, it’s a standard way cameras can embed metadata within a photo file. That data can include the camera model that took the shot, what exposure settings were used, where a photo was taken and, most pertinent in Trump’s case, the time the photo was taken.

That last point is of particular interest, since EXIF data from two Trump

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What’s this EXIF technology people used to study Trump photos? (FAQ)



a man standing in front of a table: An Oct. 3 photo shows President Donald Trump at Walter Reed hospital. White House


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An Oct. 3 photo shows President Donald Trump at Walter Reed hospital. White House

President Donald Trump’s case of COVID-19 gave an obscure photo data technology called EXIF its 15 minutes of internet fame as people started scrutinizing photos taken of him this weekend at Walter Reed hospital. But what exactly is EXIF?

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In short, it’s a standard way cameras can embed metadata within a photo file. That data can include the camera model that took the shot, what exposure settings were used, where a photo was taken and, most pertinent in Trump’s case, the time the photo was taken.

That last point is of particular interest, since EXIF data from two Trump photos the White House released Saturday indicated they could have been taken 10 minutes apart. That fueled criticisms that the shots were staged photo ops. That, in turn, fueled debate

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