League Of Legends: Wild Rift Releases For iOS This Year, Uses iPhone 12 A14 Chip And 5G

Riot Games appeared on stage during Apple’s iPhone 12 event to announce that League of Legends: Wild Rift will arrive on iPhone devices later this year. The mobile adaptation of the wildly popular MOBA League of Legends comes at a time when another hit multiplayer game–Fortnite–remains unavailable on iOS devices.

An official release date for League of Legends: Wild Rift was not confirmed; we just know it will release sometime in 2020. The announcement was made while Apple officially unveiled the iPhone 12, the company’s latest flagship phone. The exact phones that support Wild Rift were not shared, but we do know it’ll take advantage of the iPhone 12’s new A14 Bionic chip and 5G functionality. How exactly it will utilize the new chip was not shared in great detail, but Riot touted the “fast speeds” that the new line of iPhones will allow for when playing Wild Rift.

An

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League Of Legends: Wild Rift Releases For iOS This Year, Uses iPhone 12’s A14 Chip And 5G

Riot Games appeared on stage during Apple’s iPhone 12 event to announce that League of Legends: Wild Rift will arrive on iPhone devices later this year.

An official release date for League of Legends: Wild Rift was not confirmed; we just know it will release sometime in 2020. The announcement was made while Apple officially unveiled the iPhone 12, the company’s latest flagship phone. The exact phones that support Wild Rift were not shared, but we do know it’ll take advantage of the iPhone 12’s new A14 Bionic chip and 5G functionality. How exactly it will utilize the new chip was not shared in great detail, but Riot touted the “fast speeds” that the new line of iPhones will allow for when playing Wild Rift.

An Android version of Wild Rift is also planned for release. You can sign up for an iOS beta now or pre-register for the Android

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RUDN University mathematician refined the model of predator-prey relations in the wild

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IMAGE: The traditional mathematical model of predator-prey relations in the wild does not take into account indirect nonlocal interactions. However, according to a mathematician from RUDN University, they affect the dynamics…
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Credit: RUDN University

The traditional mathematical model of predator-prey relations in the wild does not take into account indirect nonlocal interactions. However, according to a mathematician from RUDN University, they affect the dynamics of predators and prey in a system, and the nature of this effect is sensitive to the initial conditions. An article about his work was published in the Communications in Nonlinear Science and Numerical Simulation journal.

Ecologists use mathematical models of ecosystems to understand their structure and predict their development. Predator-prey is one of the basic models of this kind. With its help scientists can for instance calculate changes in the numbers of carnivores and herbivores depending on numerous conditions: the breeding of the

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Mathematician refines model of predator-prey relations in the wild

RUDN University mathematician refined the model of predator-prey relations in the wild
The traditional mathematical model of predator-prey relations in the wild does not take into account indirect nonlocal interactions. However, according to a mathematician from RUDN University, they affect the dynamics of predators and prey in a system, and the nature of this effect is sensitive to the initial conditions. Credit: RUDN University

The traditional mathematical model of predator-prey relations in the wild does not take into account indirect nonlocal interactions. However, according to a mathematician from RUDN University, they affect the dynamics of predators and prey in a system, and the nature of this effect is sensitive to the initial conditions. An article about his work was published in the Communications in Nonlinear Science and Numerical Simulation journal.


Ecologists use mathematical models of ecosystems to understand their structure and predict their development. Predator-prey is one of the basic models of this kind. With its help scientists can for instance calculate

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Wild Chickens Rule the Streets in Some Beach Towns. Here’s Why One Scientist Is Studying Them

This article appeared in the November 2020 issue of Discover magazine as “Where the Wild Things Crow.” Subscribe for more stories like these.


If you’ve ever hit the beaches of Key West, Bermuda or Hawaii looking for a tranquil vacation, you may have experienced a rude awakening. By a rooster, that is.

These tourist-laden seaside towns are full of feral chickens. They roam the graveyards. They strut the beaches. They peck at leftovers beneath busy tables on restaurant patios. Legends about the birds abound, including that one flock arrived on the wings of a Pan Am jet and that some were bred to have extra toes. But are they good for anything besides waking us up?

Eben Gering thinks so. He’s been chasing free-roaming fowl around beaches across the globe for almost a decade. An assistant professor of biology at Nova Southeastern University in south Florida, Gering is convinced that

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Scientists repeat century-old study to reveal evidence of evolutionary rescue in the wild — ScienceDaily

A tiny flatworm found commonly on the coasts of western Europe and North America is living proof that species may be able to evolve and adapt to rapid climate change.

Research by the University of Plymouth examined the extent to which the intertidal flatworm Procerodes littoralis was able to regenerate and repair itself when challenged with different sea water conditions.

Repeating a study conducted more than a century earlier it was shown that the response of individuals had changed markedly since then.

The original study was conducted by Dorothy Jordan Lloyd, who was based at the Marine Biological Association in Plymouth, and focussed on individuals found in Wembury Bay, Plymouth.

It was published in 1914, and the current study — led by BSc (Hons) Marine Biology graduate Katharine Clayton — replicated it in terms of the processes followed and the precise locations from which samples were collected.

When tested across

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The Xbox Series X And PlayStation 5 Have No Wild Ideas, And It’s A Bummer

If there’s a piece of video game hardware that ever really impressed me, outside of the return and rapid advancement of virtual reality, it has to be Kinect. Microsoft’s natural movement input camera turned your body into a controller for the Xbox 360, and it worked surprisingly well in translating a person’s movements to a character on a TV screen. Playing games like bowling with Kinect, picking up an imaginary ball and flinging it down an imaginary lane only to see all that kinetic energy made “real” in a video game, felt like a form of magic.

As Kinect started to get hacked to serve as the eyes for robots or to help improve the accuracy of surgeons, I thought for sure we’d see the device become an important part of not just the gaming landscape but of innovations in technology in general. When Microsoft announced the Xbox One in

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Germany confirms two more swine fever cases in wild boar

HAMBURG (Reuters) – Another two cases of African swine fever (ASF) have been confirmed in wild boars in the eastern German state of Brandenburg, the state government said on Friday.

The new discoveries bring total confirmed cases to 34 since the first one on Sept. 10, all in wild animals, with no farm pigs affected.

All have been found in the region of the first discovery in the Brandenburg area.

Germany’s Friedrich-Loeffler scientific institute had confirmed the latest animals had ASF, the Brandenburg state government said.

China and a series of other pork buyers banned imports of German pork this month after the first case was confirmed, causing Chinese pork prices to surge.

The disease is not dangerous to humans but it is fatal to pigs and a massive outbreak in China, the world’s biggest pork producer, has led to hundreds of millions of pigs being culled.

The German government

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Wild comeback propels No. 8 Texas to 63-56 OT victory over Texas Tech

Texas came back.

The No. 8 Longhorns scored two touchdowns less than two minutes apart in the final 2:39 of regulation on the way to a 63-56 overtime win at Texas Tech.

Texas Tech went up 56-41 on a 75-yard run by SaRodorick Thompson with 3:13 left. At that point, the game looked like it was going to be over and Texas was going to lose hours after No. 3 Oklahoma lost.

But Brennan Eagles caught a TD pass from Sam Ehlinger with 2:39 left and then the Longhorns got a fantastic bounce on an onside kick to retain possession after that score.

Ehlinger then hit Joshua Moore for an 18-yard touchdown with 40 seconds left to cut Tech’s lead to two. And then it was Eagles’ turn again as he caught the game-tying two-point conversion.

Texas got the ball first in overtime and scored when Ehlinger found Moore for

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