Nvidia GeForce RTX 3080 graphics gives your gaming PC wings

nvidia-geforce-rtx-3080-founders-08135

Lori Grunin/CNET

New graphics cards bring opportunity. For better gaming, faster performance and expensive hardware sales. But they also bring challenges, with driver issues, design challenges and often supply shortages. 

As delivered by GeForce RTX 3080-based graphics cards, the latest version of the company’s GPU architecture achieves playable frame rates in games which use fancy RTX-specific features like ray-tracing and global illumination. Its AI-based upscaling feature, DLSS, lets you finally play in 4K at (frequently) better-than bare-minimum frame rates without visible degradation in quality. The GPU also lifts performance over predecessors in games that don’t take advantage of the whizzy features by about 20%-40% on average, which is really most games. 

But the 30-series of GPUs Nvidia launched at the beginning of September, powered by the new  Ampere architecture, has already run into problems. There’ve been reports of instability with some third-party 3080-based cards because of capacitor design, as well

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Quieter wind beneath the wings

Quieter wind beneath the wings
KAUST researchers are using simulations to better understand how airborne vehicles generate noise with the aim of reducing it. Credit: KAUST

Efficiently simulating the noise generated by wings and propellers promises to accelerate the development of quieter aircraft and turbines.


A new simulation approach has enabled a first practical, and highly accurate, computation of the noise characteristics of complex three-dimensional airfoil designs under extreme operating conditions. By shortening simulations that would have taken months or weeks to run to just days or hours, the new approach could accelerate the development of quieter airfoil designs to enable the next generation of aircraft and urban airborne vehicles.

“Aircraft noise is already a problem for many communities located near major airports, and this will only get worse with the expanded use of drones and, in the future, air taxis and private airborne vehicles,” says Radouan Boukharfane, a postdoc at KAUST.

Airfoils—wings, propellers and

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