Can Wisdom, Technology, And Collective Knowledge Build A Better Future?

We are a society of seven billion human beings all with the ability to almost instantly connect. In seconds, we can send a text message or start a video chat with a friend on the other side of the planet. We often take for granted how easy it is to hop on a plane and sip coffee with that same friend a day later.

We are forever interconnected, now more than ever before. Not long ago, it’d be hard to imagine a board meeting without every executive physically sitting in the room. Now, it’s common to hash out quarterly planning strategies or discuss budgets while leaders sit in comfortably in their offices (or homes) thousands of miles apart.

But the perks of an interconnected world is more than just about pleasure, convenience, or savings on travel expenses. According to Rajesh Kasturirangan—the co-founder and CEO of Socratus—bringing together

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Cross-cultural study finds a strong inverse correlation between loneliness and wisdom — ScienceDaily

Over the last few decades, there has been growing concern about loneliness across all ages, particularly in middle-aged and older adults. Loneliness, defined as feeling isolated or not having an adequate number of meaningful personal connections, is consistently associated with unhealthy aging and has been identified as a major risk factor for overall adverse health outcomes.

In a recent cross-cultural study, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and University of Rome La Sapienza examined middle-aged and older adults in San Diego and Cilento, Italy and found loneliness and wisdom had a strong negative correlation.

The study, publishing in the October 1, 2020 online edition of Aging and Mental Health, suggests wisdom may be a protective factor against loneliness.

“An important finding from our study was a significant inverse correlation between loneliness and wisdom. People with higher scores on a measure of wisdom were less lonely

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Research challenges conventional wisdom about key autism trait — ScienceDaily

A new study into the causes of sensorimotor impairments prevalent among autistic people could pave the way for better treatment and management in the future, say psychologists.

Publishing findings in the leading journal BRAIN, the scientists from the universities of Exeter and Bath present fresh evidence that sensorimotor difficulties associated with autism are likely caused by a number of complex and precise neurobiological processes, including differences in the way autistic people perceive the world around them.

Common sensorimotor features associated with autism can include sensory overload and impaired hand-eye coordination but also general clumsiness. In addition to the well-documented challenges traditionally associated with autism — notably in social communication and interaction, and restricted and repetitive patterns of behaviours — these impairments represent a major hurdle for individuals and typically will last throughout their lives.

Yet, despite this, surprisingly little is known about the origins or mechanisms underlying these behavioural

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