‘Wear the damn mask and follow the science’: Chris Wallace doesn’t mince words during Fox appearance

Three days after the first presidential debate, Donald Trump has tested positive for COVID-19, while Joe Biden tested negative on Friday. But what of the third man on the stage Tuesday night, debate moderator and Fox News anchor Chris Wallace?

Now he’s getting tested, too.

“You can bet — I’ve already been asked by a lot of people — I’m going to have to get a test,” Wallace said Friday on “Fox & Friends.”

Wallace, 72, said he never got closer than 10 or 12 feet to the president, who did not approach him after the contentious debate ended. Biden did go over to the moderator briefly, “basically to say, ‘I bet you didn’t know you had signed up for this,’” Wallace told the morning show hosts.

He went on to note that everyone allowed into the hall at Case Western Reserve University had to take a COVID test ―

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Chris Wallace doesn’t mince words during Fox appearance

Three days after the first presidential debate, Donald Trump has tested positive for COVID-19, while Joe Biden tested negative on Friday. But what of the third man on the stage Tuesday night, debate moderator and Fox News anchor Chris Wallace?



Chris Wallace wearing a suit and tie: Moderator Chris Wallace of Fox News speaks at the first presidential debate Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020, at Case Western University and Cleveland Clinic, in Cleveland.


© Olivier Douliery
Moderator Chris Wallace of Fox News speaks at the first presidential debate Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020, at Case Western University and Cleveland Clinic, in Cleveland.

Now he’s getting tested, too.

“You can bet — I’ve already been asked by a lot of people — I’m going to have to get a test,” Wallace said Friday on “Fox & Friends.”

Wallace, 72, said he never got closer than 10 or 12 feet to the president, who did not approach him after the contentious debate ended. Biden did go over to the moderator briefly, “basically to say, ‘I bet you didn’t know you had signed up for this,’”

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‘Digital chemistry’ breakthrough turns words into molecules

chemistry
Credit: OpenClipartVectors, CC0 Public Domain

A new system capable of automatically turning words into molecules on demand will open up the digitisation of chemistry, scientists say.


Researchers from the University of Glasgow’s School of Chemistry, who developed the system, claim it will lead to the creation of a “Spotify for chemistry”—a vast online repository of downloadable recipes for important molecules including drugs.

The creation of such a system could help developing countries more easily access medications, enable more efficient international scientific collaboration, and even support the human exploration of space.

The Glasgow team, led by Professor Lee Cronin, have laid the groundwork for digital chemistry with the development of what they call a “chemical processing unit”—an affordable desktop-sized robot chemist which is capable of doing the repetitive and time-consuming work of creating chemicals. Other robot chemists, built with different operating systems, have also been developed elsewhere.

Up until now, those

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With Warm Words and Fast Visas, Neighbours Woo IT Workers Fleeing Belarus | Technology News

By Ilya Zhegulev, Margaryta Chornokondratenko and Andrius Sytas

KYIV/VILNIUS (Reuters) – After Max Korolevsky said he was detained and beaten by security forces during mass protests in Belarus, he asked his IT company to transfer him to neighbouring Ukraine.

The 30-year-old, head of software testing at a technology firm he declined to name, is now in Kyiv, part of an exodus of workers from Belarus’ flourishing IT sector who are fleeing turmoil since a disputed Aug. 9 election.

Mass protests have rocked the country and represent the gravest threat to President Alexander Lukashenko’s rule since he took power 26 years ago.

Neighbouring countries from Ukraine to the Baltics have rolled out the welcome mat for people like Korolevsky and are wooing companies to relocate with fast-track immigration procedures, tax breaks and help finding office space.

Poland, for example, has set up a 24-hour hotline and offered fast visas, Polish language

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More than words: Diversity Window helps companies take action on diversity and inclusion

Diversity Window co-founders Michael Brown, left, and Don Hyun. (Diversity Window Photo)

Following the death of George Floyd at the hands of police and the resulting protests worldwide, tech companies and leaders have been vocal in their support for Black Lives Matter and racial equity. But recognizing that words aren’t enough, some companies are looking to take concrete actions to improve diversity within their workplaces, and encouraging others to do the same.

“It’s important for companies to come out and say they care, and to have initiatives around this,” said Seattle-area entrepreneur Michael Brown.

Brown, together with Don Hyun, launched Diversity Window to help companies take bolder steps to promote diversity and inclusion.

Its clients include Bluehawk Consulting, a 200-employee Kirkland-Wash.-based firm that provides staff to technology companies and others. The business has gender and racial diversity in its leadership team, but recognizes that it can do more.

“A lot

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