If This New Tech Works, You Won’t Need 32 Ether to Earn Staking Rewards

Blox, a non-custodial Ethereum 2.0 staking platform, is developing a solution that will allow users to pool their ether (ETH) cryptocurrency to get past the threshold required for staking when the upgraded network goes live.

  • The cryptocurrency accounting service provider announced on Wednesday that it is working alongside the Ethereum Foundation to develop “secret shared validator” nodes.
  • By creating a network of decentralized staking pools, Blox said it would allow users to aggregate their ETH and reach the required 32 ETH to stake on the network.
  • “Allowing ETH stakers to join the network and generate rewards with any amount of ETH is pivotal for making Eth 2.0 accessible for everyone,” said Blox’s CEO Alon Muroch.
  • Staking on Eth 2.0 requires a minimum of 32 ETH in order to participate and is expected to see an estimated 4.6%-10.3% rate of return on a user’s initial stake.
  • According to Blox, the entire
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Apple’s Intercom Feature Works on iPhone, iPad, HomePod, Apple Watch, AirPods, and CarPlay

During the unveiling of HomePod mini at Tuesday’s Apple event, Apple introduced an upcoming new feature called Intercom that works across all Apple devices with the exception, it would seem, of Mac.


Intercom will enable family members to communicate with each other wherever they are in the home, with the ability to send and receive spoken messages via HomePod speakers. If a family member is in the garden or away from home, they can still use Intercom on their iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, and even CarPlay. Apple explains:

A new Intercom feature offers a quick and easy way for family members to connect with each other at home. One person can send an Intercom message from one ‌HomePod‌ to another — whether in a different room, a specific zone, or multiple rooms throughout the home — and their voice will automatically play on the designated ‌HomePod‌ speaker. Intercom works with

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Among Us Now Has Cheaters, But A Fix Is In The Works

Among Us players have started to experience different types of cheating when they hop into matches. Thanks to cheaters, players have had their nicknames edited, their entire crews ejected at the start of the match, and had games where there was an extra impostor. In a game that places so much emphasis on meta-gaming and trust, this is a substantial issue. The three person studio Innersloth has been trying to tackle the problem. It recently explained how it’s hoping to do so.

“We’re rushing to get an account system in place so we can have better moderation and reporting systems built around that,” Among Us programmer Forest Willard told Kotaku. “Also getting help with making the servers better at detecting and blocking hacks. And investigating client-side hack prevention as well. I’m sort of scrambling to get all the right people in place, but I’m attacking it from multiple angles so

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Google Assistant Now Works With Android Apps

Google announced that now it’s possible to use Google Assistant with third-party apps on Android phones. So, Android users will be able to search and control their third-party apps when they ask it to Google Assistant. Google is rolling out the ability to search apps, use voice commands for popular tasks like sending text messages, ask for the news on Twitter, or browsing your shopping cart. For example, you can now say, “Hey Google, search cozy blankets on Etsy” and get right to what you’re looking for. Or if you’re looking for something (or someone) specific within an app, just say, “Hey Google, open Selena Gomez on Snapchat.” 

Previously, Google Assistant’s third-party support was largely limited to some custom actions, mostly apps that run within Assistant. With the new functionality, Google Assistant will work directly with apps that you have installed on your phone. Now, these kinds of voice commands

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Squadrons’, And I Hope It Works

Star Wars Squadrons is a game. Developed by Motive and published by EA, it released on October 2 to solid reviews and plenty of praise from long time fans of Star Wars starfighter games, the likes of which we haven’t seen for a good long time. It costs $40, and it’s available on PS4, PC, and Xbox One. And, as far the story of where this game is going, that’s sort of it. Here in 2020, that’s a remarkable thing.

Bug fixes and the like aside, EA and Motive have no plans to introduce new content for Star Wars Squadrons, a strategy that’s nearly unheard of in the modern industry for anything but smaller, bite-sized indie games. Creative director Ian Frazier outlined the approach in an interview with Upload VR, where he doesn’t completely close the door to more stuff—the video game industry is

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Typeface that looks like handwriting works best with warm message, study finds — ScienceDaily

Appeals seeking donations to help fight hunger during the COVID-19 pandemic were more successful when the typeface in which the appeal was written mirrored the tone of the donation request, a new study has found.

In a study that asked prospective donors to consider whether and how much to give to a local food bank to help fight hunger during the coronavirus pandemic, researchers found that donors were more likely to give when heartfelt messages were written in typefaces that looked like handwriting, and when messages that talked about the power of an organization were written in typeface that looked more business-like.

In other words, make the font match the message to get more donations, the researchers said.

“Our research suggests that simply changing the typeface of appeals messages could make those appeals stronger and encourage people to make donations,” said Huiling Huang, a consumer sciences doctoral student at The

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Twitter plans to change how image cropping works following concerns over racial bias

Twitter this week announced it would be changing how image cropping works on its website after concerns that the machine learning-based algorithm the company was using was racially biased in how it cropped images, in particular by favoring white faces over Black ones.





© Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge


In a post diving into the issue, Parag Agrawal, the company’s chief technology officer, and design chief Dantley Davis explained how the company tested the model for racial or gender bias before it implemented the system. But Twitter didn’t publish how it had done those tests at the time so that external analysis could be performed, in what the company calls “an oversight.”

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“What you see is what you get”

To fix that, Twitter is “currently conducting additional analysis to add further rigor to our testing, are committed to sharing our findings, and are exploring ways

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YouTube website’s picture-in-picture works again on iOS 14

YouTube’s website now supports iOS 14’s picture-in-picture mode once again, after the functionality mysteriously disappeared last month. It can be enabled in both Safari as well as third-party browsers like Chrome or Firefox by expanding a video to play fullscreen, and then tapping the small picture-in-picture icon on the top-left of the interface. Then you’re free to minimize the browser and use other apps while the continuing to watch a video. You can also slide the PiP window to the side if you just want to hear music without the video obstructing the display.

OS-level picture-in-picture support was added as a new feature in iOS 14, but shortly afterwards stopped working on YouTube’s website for iPhone users. It continued to work for users who subscribe to YouTube Premium, perhaps unsurprisingly. It also works for iPad users.

While picture-in-picture now works in browsers, it is not available in the YouTube app

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While Facebook works to create an oversight board, industry experts formed their own

Some of Facebook’s most vocal critics are tired of waiting for its independent oversight board — so they’re starting their own.

A group of about 25 experts from academia, civil rights, politics and journalism announced Friday that they have formed a group to analyze and critique Facebook’s content moderation decisions, policies and other platform issues in the run-up to the presidential election and beyond.

The group, which calls itself the Real Facebook Oversight Board, plans to hold its first meeting via Facebook Live on Oct. 1. It will be hosted by Recode founder Kara Swisher, a New York Times contributing opinion writer.

Facebook is still working on creating its own oversight board, first described in April 2018 by CEO Mark Zuckerberg as an independent “Supreme Court” for content moderation decisions. Facebook’s board won’t launch in time to make any decisions during the presidential race. Its panel of 20 experts is

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Keysight Works with Qualcomm Technologies and SGS to Advance Testing of Cellular Vehicle-to-Everything Technology

Companies verify initial C-V2X tests based on 3GPP Release 14

SANTA ROSA, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–
Keysight Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: KEYS), a leading technology company that helps enterprises, service providers and governments accelerate innovation to connect and secure the world, announced that the company is working with Qualcomm Technologies, Inc. and SGS to help advance testing of cellular vehicle-to-everything (C-V2X) technology.

The three companies focused on test cases covering radio frequency (RF) and radio resource management (RRM) performance verification of devices used for vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) deployment scenarios. The test cases, based on 3rd generation partnership projects’ (3GPP) Release 14 specifications, support C-V2X test plans prescribed by the OmniAir Consortium and the Global Certification Forum (GCF). In August 2020, SGS used Keysight’s RF/RRM DVT & Conformance Toolset and the Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ Automotive 4G Platform to verify initial test cases at the certification company’s lab in San Diego. The Snapdragon Automotive

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