Earth’s space junk problem is getting worse. And there’s an explosive component.

Before humans first started sending objects into Earth orbit, the pocket of space around our planet was clear and clean. But the launch of Sputnik 1 in October of 1957 changed everything. Since then, the space debris has been accumulating, with the amount of useless, defunct satellites vastly outnumbering the operational objects in our orbit.



Lots of space debris is orbiting Earth, including non-functional satellites.


© Provided by Live Science
Lots of space debris is orbiting Earth, including non-functional satellites.

A new annual report from the European Space Agency (ESA) has found that while we have become aware of the problem and taken steps in recent years to mitigate it, those steps are currently not keeping up with the sheer scale of space junk.

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All spacefaring nations have contributed to the problem, which is significant: as more and more defunct objects populate near-Earth space, the risk of collision rises – which, as objects crash and shatter, produces even

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Multiple neurodevelopmental conditions may lead to worse educational outcomes — ScienceDaily

Scottish children with multiple neurodevelopmental conditions experience greater school absenteeism and exclusion, poorer exam attainment and increased unemployment, according to a study published October 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Michael Fleming of the University of Glasgow, and colleagues.

Children with neurodevelopmental conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), depression and intellectual disability often experience difficulties at school. Multiple neurodevelopmental conditions commonly coexist, but this phenomenon, known as neurodevelopmental multimorbidity, has received relatively little attention in children compared to adults. To address this gap in knowledge, Fleming and his collaborators investigated the prevalence of neurodevelopmental multimorbidity in Scottish schoolchildren and their educational outcomes compared to their peers. The authors linked together five Scotland-wide health and education databases to identify neurodevelopmental multimorbidity in 766,244, four- to 19-year-old children attending school in Scotland between 2009 and 2013. Study limitations are that 96.2% of the participants

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Indian Women In Science Struggled Even Before The Pandemic. Now, Things Are Much Worse

Rubina Mulchandani has been unable to do any field work for the past six months. A PhD scholar at the Indian Institute of Public Health in Gurugram, Mulchandani’s research involves travelling to tertiary hospitals in Delhi to collect data from cardiology OPDs. The first major hurdle was the Delhi metro grinding to a halt on 22 March, two days before the national lockdown began. Then came the other restrictions and health risks of the pandemic. While metro services restarted in September, Mulchandani, who has already lost precious time, says she’s unlikely to get on a train anytime soon because of the health and safety risks involved.

“Early research career fellows like me often do a lot of field work. There is only so much work you can do sitting at home. We are all facing that problem, but for women, due to the fact that we face additional constraints with

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A Major Bitcoin Exchange Is In Even Worse Trouble Than Thought

The bitcoin and cryptocurrency world was rocked last week by news U.S. authorities had levied charges against major bitcoin and crypto exchange BitMEX and its leadership team.

BitMEX executives Arthur Hayes, Benjamin Delo and Samuel Reed were indicted by the U.S. government on October 1, accused of flouting U.S. banking laws while serving American customers.

Now, in a further blow to the controversial Seychelles-based bitcoin and cryptocurrency exchange, the influential blockchain data company Chainalysis has branded BitMEX a “high-risk” exchange—with external data showing investors have removed almost 50,000 bitcoin tokens from BitMEX since last week.

MORE FROM FORBESCoronavirus Has Made Akon’s $6 Billion Crypto-Powered, ‘Real-Life Wakanda’ In Senegal ‘More Necessary’

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The Nobel Prizes Have a Diversity Problem Worse Than the Scientific Fields They Honor | Best Countries

In 2007, I served as a consultant for the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences’ deliberations about the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. As a result, I was invited to attend the Nobel ceremonies. Staying at the Grand Hotel with all the awardees, I got to see how scientists – excellent but largely unknown outside their fields – suddenly became superstars.

As soon as they’re announced annually in early October, Nobel laureates become role models who are invited to give seminars all around the world. In Stockholm for the awards, these scientists were interviewed on radio and television and hobnobbed with Swedish royalty. Swedish television aired the events of Nobel week live.

As a chemist who has also investigated how science is done, seeing scientists and their research jump to the top of the public’s consciousness thanks to all the Nobel hoopla is gratifying. But in the 119 years since the Nobel

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Tree rings show scale of Arctic pollution is worse than previously thought — ScienceDaily

The largest-ever study of tree rings from Norilsk in the Russian Arctic has shown that the direct and indirect effects of industrial pollution in the region and beyond are far worse than previously thought.

An international team of researchers, led by the University of Cambridge, has combined ring width and wood chemistry measurements from living and dead trees with soil characteristics and computer modelling to show that the damage done by decades of nickel and copper mining has not only devastated local environments, but also affected the global carbon cycle.

The extent of damage done to the boreal forest, the largest land biome on Earth, can be seen in the annual growth rings of trees near Norilsk where die off has spread up to 100 kilometres. The results are reported in the journal Ecology Letters.

Norilsk, in northern Siberia, is the world’s northernmost city with more than 100,000 people,

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Space junk even worse than what we can see, astronomers say

Tracking space junk

Orbital debris, not functional satellites, make up 95 percent of the objects in this computer-generated illustration of objects in low-Earth orbit. 


NASA

The debris and detritus orbiting above our heads has been multiplying as humans send more and more satellites and rockets into space. All that space junk can pose a threat to operating satellites, and new research suggests that the problem could be much worse than previously thought. 

Astronomers at the University of Warwick attempted to cross-reference detected orbital debris in geosychronous orbit — the altitude where many large communications satellites circle our planet — with objects in public satellite catalogs. They found that more than 75 percent of the debris did not have a match. 

Most of the unknown objects were faint and small, measuring 39 inches (one meter) or less. 

“Many of

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Windows 10 Nagging To Install Edge Is Getting Worse And Worse

Microsoft is stepping up its relentless campaign to encourage Windows 10 users to run its own Edge browser.

The company has used various tactics to persuade Windows users to run the revamped Edge, including pop-ups within the operating system and questionable prompts to use Microsoft’s “recommended” browser. Now the nagging is being stepped up a gear.

The soon-to-be-launched Windows 10 20H2 update, which is due for general release in early October, already installs Microsoft Edge by default and makes it irremovable.

On my test system, which is running an early preview of Windows 10 20H2, an Edge icon is placed as the first icon on the Taskbar and there’s another shortcut to Edge placed on the desktop, in case you missed that.

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