Is the iPhone 12 worth it?

My takeaway: Most people don’t need an iPhone 12 now, but you might want one in a year or two … by which point there could be an iPhone 13 or 14 with 5G. The iPhone 12 is the phone you buy because you’re planning to hold onto it for a while.

Normally after Apple unveils a product, I get the opportunity to spend a little time with it. This launch offered only a first-look-but-don’t-touch, because coronavirus pandemic precautions pushed Apple’s event online. Until professional reviewers get our hands on the new iPhone, we’re left to judge based on what Apple claimed in its prerecorded video and on its slick, computer-generated renderings.

That’s all the more reason to bite into this new iPhone with a healthy dollop of skepticism. Apple doesn’t really compete with Android phones for our business anymore. For most iPhone owners, the choice is when to upgrade,

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Are Amazon Jobs Worth 1,400 Loads of Traffic? French Region Is Split

FOURNÈS, France — On a sultry September morning, Claudie Cortellini headed into the vineyards to survey the grapes that go into her family’s heady Côtes du Rhône wines. In recent years, she has fought to ensure a good harvest as the climate grows warmer. But these days, she is facing an even bigger foe: a giant Amazon sorting center slated for construction near her land.

The project, a concrete-and-steel behemoth that would span nine acres, promises to bring hundreds of jobs to the Gard, an agricultural region in the south of France. Tourists are drawn to the countryside to see a landmark of monumental beauty: the Pont du Gard, a 2,000-year-old Roman aqueduct that rises above the valley like a dusty jewel.

For Mrs. Cortellini and worried residents, however, the jobs are not worth the pollution and explosion in traffic the Amazon warehouse would bring.

“They say they want to

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MicroVision LiDAR Is Worth $2 Billion According To Valuation Of Velodyne And Luminar LiDAR By Ford, Baidu, Hyundai, Volvo (NASDAQ:MVIS)

For outsiders it is usually very difficult or even impossible to determine the value of a company. Especially when it is not based on sales or profits, as in the case of MicroVision (NASDAQ:MVIS), but on intellectual property (patents) and existing technology that will be used in future products. In the case of MicroVision, however, it is essential for shareholders to know the valuation, as the company or parts of it are currently up for sale. In other words, it is important to know the amount a buyer is likely to pay before the sale. The only thing that helps here is to compare the company’s products with those of its competitors. Once this has been done, the company’s valuation can then be derived from the valuations of comparable competing companies. This is what this article tries to do for MicroVision, initially only for the Automotive LiDAR division, i.e.

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Senate queries Ministry of Science, Tech for giving out vehicles worth N17m to pay debt of N2m

Senate queries Ministry of Science, Tech for giving out vehicles worth N17m to pay debt of N2m
Senate President Lawan

By Henry Umoru

The Senate Wednesday queried the Ministry of Science and Technology for giving out two vehicles worth N17 million to pay the debt of N2 million owned contractors.

The two vehicles with registration numbers are M50-101G and MGO-12FG respectively.

The revelation came up following the 2015 Auditor-General Report submitted to the Senator Matthew Urhoghide, Peoples Democratic Party, PDP, Edo South led Senate Committee on Public Accounts.

According to the Auditor General of the Federation, Anthony Ayine in the report submitted to the Committee, he said that during the verification of non-recurrent assets of the Ministry, it was discovered that two vehicles with registration M50-101G and MGO-12FG respectively were not seen and their whereabouts was not explained.

In his presentation, Director, Public Accounts in office of the Auditor General of the Federation, OAuGF, the two vehicles were seized by contractors.

But the Permanent Secretary of the

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5 Graphics Settings Worth Tweaking in Every PC Game

The human eye has a relatively wide field of view—you can see someone approaching from the side through your peripheral vision. When you’re playing a game, your character doesn’t have this same peripheral vision, because you’re playing on a screen that takes up only a portion of your own field of view. That means you won’t see as many enemies coming up the side, or you may even feel motion sick when moving the camera around fast.

Adjusting the oft-ignored Field of View setting can help with this, provided your game offers it. Widening the field of view may add a slight fisheye effect to the edges of the screen, but you’ll be able to see more of the game world, and it may help reduce that nausea. (It’ll also hamper performance a bit, since the game has to render more objects.) The ideal field of view is dependent on

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Here’s How Much Investing $1,000 In The 5 Biggest Dot-Com Bubble Tech Stocks Would Be Worth Today

Despite an ongoing pandemic and the U.S. economy barely limping along, the Nasdaq is still trading more than 50% above its March lows. The surge in tech stocks in 2020 has understandably led investors to draw comparisons to the dot-com bubble in 2000.

The Nasdaq ultimately peaked at 5,048.62 on March 10, 2000. Of course, some dot-com bubble stocks have performed much better than others in the 20 years since the bubble burst.

FANG Stocks Of Dot Com Bubble: Today’s investors are very familiar with the FANG stocks, Facebook, Inc. (NASDAQ: FB), Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ: AMZN), Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ: NFLX) and Alphabet, Inc. (NASDAQ: GOOGL) (NASDAQ: GOOGL). These four stocks both led the bull market since the 2008 financial crisis and dominate today’s market with their massive market caps.

The dot-com had its own growth of FANG-esque stocks that dominated the tech sector back in 2000:

  • Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT)

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A Major Tesla Investor Has Predicted Bitcoin Will Be Worth More Than $1 Trillion In Under 10 Years

Bitcoin has had a strong start to the decade, adding over 40% to its price so far this year—and taking its market capitalization to around $200 billion.

The bitcoin price, which began the year at around $7,000 per bitcoin token, has been on a roller coaster through 2020, crashing to under $4,000 in March before rebounding to well over $10,000.

With a raft of established investors turning to bitcoin this year as a potential hedge against the inflation they see coming as a result of unprecedented government spending and money-printing, a prominent investor in electric car-maker Tesla
TSLA
has said it expects bitcoin’s total value to balloon to between $1 trillion and $5 trillion during the next five to ten years.

MORE FROM FORBESBitcoin And Blockchain Are The ‘Future’ Of Twitter, CEO Jack Dorsey Reveals

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3 High-Growth Tech Stocks That Are Worth Paying Up For

When looking for companies to invest in, it’s only natural to try and find stocks that are good deals. But sometimes looking too hard for value stocks can lead investors to overlook high-growth companies.

To be sure, many fast-growing companies are more expensive than bargain stocks. But if investors buy the right companies and hold onto them for years, these more expensive stocks can still be worth the investment over the long term. To help investors find a few tech stocks that are growing fast — and that are still worth buying — we asked a few Motley Fool contributors for their top picks. They came back with Veeva Systems (NYSE:VEEV), Shopify (NYSE:SHOP), and Zoom Video Communications (NASDAQ:ZM). Here’s why. 

A person looking at a tablet.

Image source: Getty Images.

Focused, sticky, and profitable, with digital transformation tailwinds

Brian Withers (Veeva): Veeva has come a long way since it was founded in 2007.

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Kin + Carta Launches ‘Working Better,’ a Podcast about Technology and Problems Worth Solving

“What I love about Working Better, and what I think listeners will love, is that we’re not just talking about problems worth solving, but putting forth ideas and, in some cases, actually building solutions for some of the challenges,” said Scott Hermes, host of Working Better and Director of Solution Delivery at Kin + Carta. “We’re looking at problems through a human lens first, bringing a variety of voices together to start some of these conversations that we believe should happen.”

Working Better features perspectives from business leaders, educators, journalists, authors, farmers, scientists, software engineers, designers, researchers and more. In the first episode, launching September 29, host Scott Hermes tackles the question “Why haven’t contact tracing apps caught on?” together with guests Jenny Wanger, Head of Implementor’s Forum at Linux Foundation Public Health (LFPH), Ellie Daw, Working Group Lead at TCN Coalition, and Paul Heckel,

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While a Fort Worth murder suspect grew old, the DNA science that jailed him grew up

The brother of a woman killed in 1974 said the technology law enforcement now uses to track down criminals has advanced greatly, and those hiding guilt should pray because they are being hunted and eventually they will be caught and punished.

Jim Walker made these comments on Tuesday, the day after Fort Worth police arrested a 77-year-old man who is facing a capital murder charge in the slaying of his sister, Carla Walker. The 17-year-old girl was abducted during a Valentine’s week date, then sexually assaulted and found dead three days later.

Glen Samuel McCurley, identified as the suspect in Walker’s slaying, remained in the Tarrant County Jail on Thursday with bond set at $100,000, according to jail records.

Edward Hueske, who was hired as a criminalist by the Fort Worth Police Department a month before Walker was killed, said this is a good resolution to this case.

“The

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