Will iPhone 12 have USB-C? We’re guessing no but really hope we’re wrong

Will the iPhone 12 use a USB-C connection or stick with Lightning? Lightning has been around since the iPhone 5 in 2012, when it debuted as a replacement for the old 30-pin charger that had been around since the iPod. Lightning had its advantages, way back: It was small, and enabled faster data transfer. But we’ve been living in the era of USB-C for years now. Lightning feels old by comparison.



a hand holding a remote control: Come on already. Sarah Tew/CNET


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Come on already. Sarah Tew/CNET



a hand holding a remote control


© Sarah Tew/CNET


Read more: iPhone 12 pricing and release date possibly revealed in leak

Apple’s iPad lineup has started to shift: the iPad Pro first, now the iPad Air this year. MacBooks have all moved to USB-C/Thunderbolt 3. I can charge an iPad Pro, MacBook Pro, Nintendo Switch, Google Stadia controller and Oculus Quest 2 all from common charge cables. And then Lightning for the rest.

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Skoda develop a smartphone app that identifies what’s wrong with your car by listening to the engine



a person driving a car: MailOnline logo


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Skoda has developed new technology it believes will make car mechanics’ lives easier – or possible make them redundant entirely.

The Czech brand – which sits under VW Group’s ownership – says it has completed successful trials of a smartphone app that can listen to any thuds, bangs or clatter produced by a vehicle and diagnose the problem from the sound alone.

Called the Skoda Sound Analyser, the manufacturer says it has a 90 per cent success rate of identifying issues with cars correctly.



a hand holding a small camera: Smart-phone app for car mechanics: Skoda has developed an application that listens to a car's engine noise to identify if it has an underlying issue that needs to be fixed by a technician


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Smart-phone app for car mechanics: Skoda has developed an application that listens to a car’s engine noise to identify if it has an underlying issue that needs to be fixed by a technician

Skoda has developed the system in house to be used by technicians in its franchised servicing departments to quickly

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Iranian government admission shows Trump right and Biden wrong on student visas | American Enterprise Institute

The Trump administration’s efforts to restrict student visas from countries designated as state sponsors of terrorism might seem like common sense, but, like everything else in an election year, it has become fodder for the partisan meatgrinder. Late last month, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement published a rule change to end indefinite visas for enrolled students originating in countries where visitors often violated the terms of their visas, or countries that are state sponsors of terrorism. None of this, of course, would end the issuance of visas; rather, certain students would have to re-apply after two or four years.

Joe Biden has generally opposed any new controls on foreign students. “Across the world, people come to this country with unrelenting optimism and determination toward the future. They study here, innovate here, they make America who we are. Donald Trump doesn’t get that — we need a president who does,” Biden

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Microsoft’s Azure AD authentication outage: What went wrong

azureadoutage.jpg

Credit: Microsoft

On September 28 and September 29 this week, a number of Microsoft customers worldwide were impacted by a cascading series of problems resulting in many being unable to access their Microsoft apps and services. On October 1, Microsoft posted its post-mortem about the outages, outlining what happened and next steps it plans to take to head this kind of issue off in the future.

Starting around 5:30 p.m. ET on Monday, September 28, customers began reporting they couldn’t sign into Microsoft and third-party applications which used Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) for authentication. (Yes, this means Office 365 and other Microsoft cloud services.) Those who were already signed in were less likely to have had issues. According to Microsoft’s report, users in the Americas and Australia were likely to be impacted more than those in Europe and Asia.

Microsoft acknowledged it was a service update targeting an internal

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No on Prop. 22. It’s the wrong solution for Uber drivers and the gig economy

Passengers connect with drivers at the ride-hailing lot at LAX on Aug. 20. <span class="copyright">(Los Angeles Times)</span>
Passengers connect with drivers at the ride-hailing lot at LAX on Aug. 20. (Los Angeles Times)

Proposition 22, which would classify drivers for app-based services such as Uber and Lyft as independent contractors but guarantee them certain benefits, is an ink-blot test.

If you think these companies are predators that exploit workers and compete unfairly, you’ll see the measure as yet another effort by the tech industry to circumvent the rules by which responsible corporate citizens play. If you think the apps provide workers an easy means to make extra money and consumers an affordable alternative to taxis, you’ll see Proposition 22 as a way to hold onto a service you value.

In reality, the measure is a fix designed by Uber and its counterparts for a problem the California Supreme Court created when it issued its Dynamex decision in 2018, making it harder for employers to classify workers as

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