Nacon unveils new smartphone controllers designed for xCloud streaming

In brief: If you’re planning on using Microsoft’s recently launched xCloud service for streaming games to your phone, a handset controller will make life a lot easier. There are plenty to choose from, including an upcoming pair from Nacon that feature both wireless connectivity and official Xbox branding.

Nacon’s new MG-X Series has been specially designed for Android mobile devices and the Xbox Game Pass Ultimate, which combines the Game Pass, Xbox Gold online gaming, and the xCloud streaming service.

The MG-X Series controllers include adjustable stands that can secure any Android phone up to 6.7 inches, so you’ll be able to squeeze the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra in there—just. And instead of connecting via USB like many similar controllers, these use Bluetooth 4.2. While the company states they’re for Android phones, the wireless functionality means they could work on Apple devices in the future should Microsoft’s web version become

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xCloud is an unfinished but inspiring glimpse of how we might game in the future

The first time you boot up an Xbox One game on an Android phone can be surreal. Earlier this month, I opened the Game Pass app on a Pixel 3A phone, connected an Xbox One controller via Bluetooth in the device settings, and tapped the “play” button on the page for Halo 5: Guardians. After a somewhat lengthy loading time, there I was on the menu screen, ready to play the exact same Halo 5 campaign that I left unfinished back in 2016.

It surprised me that my save file was intact and accessible in the cloud, letting me pick up right where I left off. The best part: I didn’t even have to unpack the Xbox One where I originally played the game. It’s sitting unplugged in a box, exactly where I left it since moving back to the East Coast at the end of the summer.

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Microsoft’s Apple workaround: How Xbox could bring Project xCloud to iOS via the web in 2021

Project xCloud, as shown at the Xbox E3 Showcase in the Microsoft Theater at L.A. Live, Sunday, June 9, 2019 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Casey Rodgers/Invision for Xbox/AP Images)

Microsoft is working on a browser-based edition of its cloud gaming service Project xCloud, according to multiple reports. Business Insider reported that Xbox chief Phil Spencer told Microsoft employees at a meeting Wednesday that the company will pursue a “direct browser-based solution” for bringing the cloud-based, multi-platform version of its Xbox Game Pass subscription service to Apple’s family of devices. The Verge cites unnamed sources confirming the plans.

This news comes almost a month after Apple launched a new set of rules for its App Store in September. It would have allowed Microsoft to officially bring an xCloud app to iOS, but only if each game on the service was submitted to Apple as a separate playable app. As there

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Microsoft is bringing xCloud to iOS via the web

Microsoft is working on a “direct browser-based solution” to bring xCloud to iOS early next year. Sources familiar with Microsoft’s plans tell The Verge that the company has been developing a web version of xCloud to run on iOS and iPadOS devices, alongside continuing its work on an app that it hopes will also eventually run on Apple’s platform.





Microsoft’s gaming chief, Phil Spencer, revealed the company’s browser-based xCloud work during a recent internal all-hands meeting. “We absolutely will end up on iOS,” said Spencer during the meeting, noting that he “feels good” about the company’s iOS progress. “We’ll end up on iPhones, and iPads with Game Pass.” Business Insider first reported the news of the web version for iOS.

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Apple has been blocking services like xCloud and Stadia from running on iOS devices via its App Store, and recently offered an olive branch to these services with

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Best XCloud Controller For Xbox Cloud Gaming On Mobile

Xbox cloud gaming launched last month with a lineup of more than 170 games. Now, anyone with an Xbox Game Pass Ultimate subscription automatically has access to Xbox cloud gaming (otherwise known as Project xCloud) and can play Xbox games on their Android smartphone or tablet. However, you’ll need a phone controller if you want to experience cloud gaming, and there are a lot of different choices to consider, from official pads that require mobile controller clips to third-party ones that don’t. Thankfully, some of the best Xbox One controllers are compatible with Android devices, and there are a lot of other great cloud gaming controller options as well.

That’s why we’ve tested and identified our picks for the best xCloud controller for use for Xbox cloud gaming on our Android phones. Each of the following controllers provides a unique but great experience, and it can be hard to tell

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Microsoft says xCloud game streaming for console and PC is on the to-do list

Earlier this year, Microsoft added Project xCloud gaming streaming to Xbox Game Pass. That roll out came after a long alpha testing period, but even though game streaming is part of the Xbox Game Pass Ultimate package, it’s only available on Android devices. Given Apple’s rules regarding App Store distribution, it’s safe to say that game streaming won’t be coming to iOS anytime soon, but what about other platforms like Xbox One and PC?

It’s a good question, because Microsoft has talked about platform-agnostic game streaming plenty of times in the past. As it turns out, this current focus on Android doesn’t necessarily mean that mobile streaming is going to be the only option from here on out. In fact, in a new tweet, Xbox chief Phil Spencer says that streaming to Xbox and PC is something that Microsoft wants to pursue in the future.

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Samsung’s Note20 Ultra And Microsoft’s xCloud Are Ushering In A Whole New Era Of Mobile Gaming

I think we can all remember a time, not all that long ago, when mobile games were nothing more than silly little diversions. Time wasters, mostly. Popular downloads like Flappy Bird, Cut the Rope and Angry Birds were admittedly fun—though ultimately shallow—experiences designed to be digested in small, bite-sized chunks.

Well, as simple and arguably charming as those initial forays into mobile gaming were, they’re a far cry from where the industry currently resides. And boy, have we come a long way.

Earlier this summer, AR sensation Pokemon Go surpassed $3.6 billion in lifetime revenue, while battle royale pioneer PUBG Mobile has pulled in over $3 billion since its launch back in 2018. Just as impressive, the mobile edition of Fortnite blew past $1 billion in earnings in only two years.

It’s the massive popularity of console-style mobile titles, like

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How Amazon’s Luna cloud gaming service compares to Stadia, xCloud, and GeForce Now

Amazon has just taken the wraps off its long-rumored Amazon Luna, meaning the company is officially jumping into the cloud gaming ring — one that has become increasingly crowded over the past year. Google launched Stadia last November, Nvidia’s GeForce Now left beta in February, and Microsoft’s cloud gaming offering (formerly known as xCloud) is included with a Game Pass Ultimate subscription as of September 15th, though it only works with Android right now.

The race is on to see which (if any) of those cloud gaming services takes off with customers, and each company is tackling cloud gaming in a slightly different way. If you’re trying to better understand each service, we’ve put together this guide for you.

Image: Amazon

Amazon Luna

Amazon’s Luna offers all-you-can-play access to different selections of games as part of separate “channels” — which sounds almost like a cable service. But at launch, you

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