A computer predicts your thoughts, creating images based on them — ScienceDaily

Researchers at the University of Helsinki have developed a technique in which a computer models visual perception by monitoring human brain signals. In a way, it is as if the computer tries to imagine what a human is thinking about. As a result of this imagining, the computer is able to produce entirely new information, such as fictional images that were never before seen.

The technique is based on a novel brain-computer interface. Previously, similar brain-computer interfaces have been able to perform one-way communication from brain to computer, such as spell individual letters or move a cursor.

As far as is known, the new study is the first where both the computer’s presentation of the information and brain signals were modelled simultaneously using artificial intelligence methods. Images that matched the visual characteristics that participants were focusing on were generated through interaction between human brain responses and a generative neural network.

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How to protect the U.S. from climate change, future pandemics

There have been almost 200,000 deaths in the United States due to the coronavirus pandemic. And now, wildfires raging across the Western seaboard have killed dozens, burned over 3.6 million acres of land and over 6,400 structures. Residents have been cooped up inside to avoid polluted air.

This is a crisis that even the titans of technology and innovation say they’re not able to fix on their own.

What the U.S. needs is for the federal government to spend more money on science, according to several billionaire tech leaders. 

“Let’s imagine a future pandemic — I’m sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but there will certainly be one. And let’s imagine that a global competitor, such as China, not only invents the solution, but keeps it to themselves,” former Google CEO Eric Schmidt wrote in a Medium blog post on September 14, published alongside his new podcast, Reimagine

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Alphabet (GOOG) Has Risen 19% in Last One Year, Outperforms Market

If you are looking for the best ideas for your portfolio you may want to consider some of RiverPark Advisors top stock picks. RiverPark Advisors, an investment management firm, is bullish on Alphabet Inc. (NASDAQ:GOOG) stock. In its Q2 2019 investor letter – you can download a copy here – the firm discussed its investment thesis on Alphabet Inc. (NASDAQ:GOOG) stock. Alphabet Inc. (NASDAQ:GOOG) is a technology company.

In July 2019, RiverPark Advisors had released its Q2 2019 investor letter. The investment firm said that Alphabet Inc. (NASDAQ:GOOG) stock was one of the top detractors to the Large Growth fund’s performance in Q2 2019. Alphabet Inc. (NASDAQ:GOOG) stock has posted a return of 19.2% in the trailing one year period, outperforming the S&P 500 Index which returned 10.7% in the same period. This suggests that the investment firm was right in its decision. On a year-to-date basis, Alphabet Inc. (NASDAQ:GOOG)

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The Next Administration Must Get Science and Technology Policy Right

As wildfires ravage the west coast, the COVID-19 pandemic continues to exact a toll on the nation as its citizens grapple with the economic fallout and businesses face uncertainty. The country is bracing itself for an even greater host of challenges in the coming months: the onset of the seasonal flu, uncertainty around the availability of a COVID-19 vaccine, underdeveloped telehealth systems, navigating the challenges of online learning and remote work that requires access to a strong digital infrastructure and broadband. These challenges underscore the urgent need for renewed investment in the science and technology enterprise and the rapid application of new scientific knowledge and advanced technology to solve complex problems.

One thing is clear: the next presidential administration must renew its commitment to investing in science and technology regardless of who wins in November. We write as a group of leaders from across science, technology and innovation who have

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Compass Diversified to Acquire Performance Fit Innovator BOA Technology

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

WESTPORT, Conn. and DENVER, Sep 22, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE via COMTEX) —
Further Expands CODI’s Best-In-Class Portfolio of Niche Market Leading Brands

CODI’s Resources and Deep Consumer Sector Expertise to Support Industry Pioneer’s Continued Product Innovation and Global Growth

Compass Diversified (NYSE: CODI) (“CODI” or the “Company”), an owner of leading middle market businesses, today announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire BOA Technology Inc. (“BOA”), creators of the award-winning BOA(R) Fit System, delivering superior fit and performance in the Outdoor, Athletic, Workwear and Medical Bracing markets worldwide, for a purchase price of $454 million (excluding working capital and certain other adjustments upon closing).

BOA was founded in 2001 with a revolutionary performance fit system that transformed how snowboarders “dialed in” their boots and offered a superior alternative to the traditional lace system.

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Daily smartphone tracking planned for first recipients of COVID-19 vaccine – U.S.

Daily smartphone tracking planned for first recipients of COVID-19 vaccine


Stars and Stripes is making stories on the coronavirus pandemic available free of charge. See other free reports here. Sign up for our daily coronavirus newsletter here. Please support our journalism with a subscription.


WASHINGTON (Tribune News Service) — Americans that get the first COVID-19 vaccines will be closely monitored by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through daily text messages and emails, according to a federal advisory group.


Essential workers who are expected to be the first recipients will get daily text messages on their smartphones asking about side effects in the first week after they get the shot, and then they’ll be contacted weekly for six weeks, said Tom Shimabukuro, a CDC immunization expert, at a meeting of the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Those workers could total about

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When The CIA Considered Weaponizing Lightning

Thunderbolts are traditionally the weapon of the gods, but in 1967 the CIA were wondering whether they, too, could call down bolts of lightning from the heavens at will.

The idea is contained in a proposal from a scientist, sent to the CIA’s Deputy for Research ‘Special Activities’ and passed on to the chief of the Air Systems division. The scientist’s name has been redacted in the declassified document from the CIA’s archive, but the proposal mentions a previous discussion with the CIA, indicating they were being taken seriously.

The guided lightning concept is based on the observation that lightning follows a path of ionized air known as a step leader. Once the leader stroke reaches the ground and makes a circuit, the lightning proper is formed and a current flow, typically around 300 million Volts at 30,000 Amps.

The scientist suggests that artificial leaders could “cause discharges to occur

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Intel supplying Huawei through license, getting around Trump blacklist

  • Intel said it has received licenses from the US government to sell certain products to Chinese tech giant Huawei, which was put on a trade blacklist back in May 2019.
  • President Donald Trump in May banned American companies from selling to Huawei, the world’s largest telecoms equipment maker, without special permission. 
  • Other tech companies including SMIC and SK Hynix have also requested a license to supply Huawei, Reuters reported.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

US tech giant Intel Corp is continuing to sell products to Huawei, despite the Chinese firm being blacklisted by the US government since May 2019.

An Intel spokesman said Tuesday that the chip manufacturer has received licenses from the US government to supply Huawei with certain products. It did not specify which products it could sell.

Chinese tech firm Huawei was placed on the Entity List — a trade blacklist including more than 275

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Army fields new chemical detection technology

IMAGE

IMAGE: Research through the U.S. Army Small Business Technology Transfer program, results in a product to accurately detect chemical weapons at low concentration levels. It is now being used by National…
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Credit: U.S. Army

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C. — Chemical weapons pose a serious threat to civilian and warfighter lives, but technology from the U.S. Army Small Business Technology Transfer program reduces those risks. Researchers developed a product to detect chemical weapons accurately at low concentration levels.

Active Army, Reserve and National Guard units started to receive the Chemical Agent Disclosure Spray and the Contamination Indicator/Decontamination Assurance System, known as CIDAS. The Army is fielding it to all units in areas where there is a threat of chemical agents.

The Chemical Agent Disclosure Spray, purchased by FLIR Systems, Inc., has transitioned into the CIDAS Program of Record within the Joint Program Executive Office for CBRN Defense. The research,

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Yup, Galaxy Note 20 Ultra’s camera took all of these stunning landscape photos

note-20-mull-promo

Andrew Hoyle/CNET

The Galaxy Note 20 Ultra has a lot to shout about: a massive screen, its handy S Pen stylus, 5G connectivity and an attractive design. That all makes it a great phone for high-flying business types, but how does it fare on a rugged photography adventure on a remote island? To find out, I took it to the stunning Isle of Mull off the west coast of Scotland, and found that the Note is more than just a business tool. 

Here’s what I liked. 

Awesome 5x zoom

It’s a given that the Note 20 should be able to take cracking photos in its standard zoom mode. And it does — they’re bright and vibrant and packed with detail. But it’s the zoom skills that I really loved on my trip. The 5x optical zoom let me get wildly different compositions in my images that are simply out of

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