Apple adds Greg Joswiak to leadership webpage, lists Phil Schiller as ‘Apple Fellow’

Apple on Friday updated its leadership webpage to reflect Greg Joswiak’s replacement of Phil Schiller as Worldwide Marketing head, as well as to note Schiller’s new role of “Apple Fellow.”

The Cupertino tech giant announced in August that Phil Schiller would be transitioned out of his role as SVP of Worldwide Marketing and replaced by Joswiak. As “Apple Fellow,” Schiller will continue to lead the App Store and Apple events, but will no longer oversee Apple’s marketing team.

On its updated leadership page, Joswiak is now listed as Apple’s SVP of Worldwide Marketing, while Schiller is the only one on Apple’s executive leadership team to carry the title of “Apple Fellow.”

In August, Schiller confirmed that he is not leaving Apple and that he would remain with the company “as long as they will have me.”

Apple CEO Tim Cook said in August that Joswiak’s “many years of leadership

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Momentus forges agreements with Skykraft and Mecano ID

SAN FRANCISCO – In-space transportation startup Momentus announced service agreements Oct. 2 with Australia’s Skykraft and French spacecraft engineering company Mecano ID.

Santa, Clara, California-based Momentus revealed plans to deploy a pathfinder for Skykraft’s microsatellite constellation on a Vigoride flight in June 2021. Momentus plans to send the Skykraft microsatellite into orbit via EOS, a separation ring developed by Mecano ID with funding from the French space agency CNES.

If successful, the June 2021 Skykraft flight will be the qualification flight for EOS, which “opens the door for commercialization,” according to the Oct. 2 news release.

Momentus plans to launch a second Skykraft microsatellite in late 2021 under the launch services agreement announced Oct. 2.

Skykraft, a spin-off of the University of New South Wales Canberra Space Programme, specializes in design, manufacturing and operations of small satellite constellations. The startup, founded in 2017, plans to establish a constellation of 210

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How Kukri Snakes Kill | These Snakes Can Devour the Insides of Prey

  • Researchers have published a new paper describing the downright vicious way kukri snakes take down some of their prey—in this case, Asian black-spotted toads.
  • The kukri, who uses specialized teeth to create a gash in the body of the toad, destroys its prey by pulling its viscera out and consuming it creating a truly gruesome way to go.

    In a straight up savage move, small-banded kukri snakes (Oligodon fasciolatus) native to Thailand have been spotted literally tearing into Asian black-spotted toads and eating their viscera while the toads are still alive.

    🐍You love awesome animals. So do we. Let’s nerd out over them together.

    This “unknown feeding mode” has both fascinated and horrified researchers who have witnessed the phenomenon first-hand and published their findings in the journal Herpetozoa this September. According to the paper, the researchers analyzed three separate cases in which O. fasciolatus was seen

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    Commerce Puts Tighter Export Controls On New Technologies

    Law360 (October 2, 2020, 6:01 PM EDT) — The U.S. Department of Commerce tightened export controls on six developing technologies in a rule issued Friday, targeting tools used to make integrated circuits and microprocessors, and certain hacking tools and surveillance software.

    The final rule implements multilateral controls on recently developed, or developing, technologies that were agreed to at a December 2019 meeting of signatories to the Wassenaar Arrangement, an international agreement covering export controls for certain weapons and dual-use technologies that have both military and civilian uses.

    “The United States’ implementation of WA list changes ensures that U.S. companies have a level playing field with their competitors in other…

    Stay ahead of the curve

    In the legal profession, information is the key to success. You have to know what’s happening with clients, competitors, practice areas, and industries. Law360 provides the intelligence you need to remain an expert and beat the

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    Wildfires May Pose Drinking Water Safety Issues

    Two months after a wildfire burned through Paradise, Calif., in 2018, Kevin Phillips, then a manager for town’s irrigation district, walked from one destroyed home to another.

    Burned out cars, the occasional chimney and the melted skeletons of washers and dryers were the only recognizable shapes.

    “You started to actually be shocked when you saw a standing structure,” he said.

    Mr. Phillips, now Paradise’s town manager, was following the team taking samples from intact water meters connected to homes that were now reduced to gray ash. He knew from the Tubbs Fire in 2017 that harmful toxins were likely in the water distribution system: Rapid action would be needed to protect people returning to the community from the dangers of toxins like benzene, which can cause nausea and vomiting in the short-term, or even cancer over time.

    Wildfires, which turned skies a dim orange over cities from Seattle to Santa

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    But many experts surveyed also believe vaccine development will take place at an accelerated rate — ScienceDaily

    Experts working in the field of vaccine development tend to believe that an effective vaccine is not likely to be available for the general public before the fall of 2021. In a paper published this week in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, a McGill-led team published the results of a recent survey of 28 experts working in vaccinology.

    The survey was carried out in late June 2020. The majority of those surveyed were mostly Canadian or American academics with an average of 25 years of experience working in the field.

    “Experts in our survey offered forecasts on vaccine development that were generally less optimistic than the timeline of early 2021 offered by US public officials. In general they seem to believe that a publicly available vaccine next summer is the best-case scenario with the possibility that it may take until 2022,” said Jonathan Kimmelman, a James McGill professor

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    Bowser arrested and charged for selling Nintendo Switch hacks

    Two members of a console hacking and piracy organization known as Team Xecuter have been arrested and charged with fraud, one of whom is named Gary Bowser. French national Max Louarn and Bowser, originally from Canada but arrested in the Dominican Republic, allegedly led the group, which makes a line of tools for cracking locked-down gaming hardware.

    Team Xecuter is a sophisticated operation known best for its Nintendo hacks, including a USB device called the SX Pro that allows the Nintendo Switch to run pirated games. The group’s for-profit motive has made it controversial in the modding and emulation communities, reports Ars Technica, because those communities tend to focus on open-source efforts and shy away from selling products that could draw the attention of both console makers and federal authorities. Team Xecuter also makes hacking tools for the Nintendo 3DS and the NES Classic, among other devices.

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    Google wakes up from its VR daydream

    Daydream, Google’s mobile-focused virtual reality platform, is losing official support from Google, Android Police reports. The company confirmed that it will no longer be updating the Daydream software, with the publication noting that “Daydream may not even work on Android 11” as a result of this.

    This isn’t surprising to anyone who has been tracking the company’s moves in the space. After aggressive product rollouts in 2016 and 2017, Google quickly abandoned its VR efforts, which, much like the Samsung Gear VR, allowed users to drop a compatible phone into a headset holster and use the phone’s display and compute to power VR experiences.

    After Apple’s announcement of ARKit, the company did a hard pivot away from VR, turning its specialty AR platform Tango into ARCore, an AR developer platform that has also not seen very much attention from Google in recent months.

    Google bowing out of official support from

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    As atmospheric carbon rises, so do rivers, adding to flooding

    flood
    Credit: CC0 Public Domain

    When it comes to climate change, relationships are everything. That’s a key takeaway of a new UO study that examines the interaction between plants, atmospheric carbon dioxide and rising water levels in the Mississippi River.


    Published recently in the Geological Society of America’s journal GSA Today, the study compared historical atmospheric carbon data against observations of herbarium leaf specimens to quantify the relationship between rising carbon levels and increasingly catastrophic floods in the American Midwest.

    Using data covering more than two centuries, researchers demonstrated that as carbon levels in the atmosphere have risen due to the burning of fossil fuels, the ability of plants to absorb water from the air has decreased. That means more rainfall makes its way into rivers and streams, adding to their potential for damaging floods.

    Co-authored by UO Museum of Natural and Cultural History geologist Greg Retallack and earth sciences

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    iPhone 12 should have Touch ID like the iPad Air — but it probably won’t

    Apple’s new iPad Air integrates Touch ID into a button on the side of the iPad.


    Apple

    This story is part of Apple Event, our full coverage of the latest news from Apple headquarters.

    One of the best new Apple features introduced during our unusual times may not appear in the iPhone 12. It may not arrive on any iPhone until next year — if at all. Apple’s new iPad Air, unveiled in mid-September and hitting the market later this month, relocates Touch ID to a button on the edge of the device. The company’s upcoming iPhone 12 lineup should do something similar, giving users an option between unlocking their iPhone using their face or unlocking it with their fingerprint as the world combats the coronavirus pandemic

    Apple’s updated $599 (£579, AU$899) iPad Air integrates Touch ID into the power button on top of the tablet.

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