Addresses major testing need in developing world; also in US, where reagent supplies are again dwindling — ScienceDaily

A major roadblock to large scale testing for coronavirus infection in the developing world is a shortage of key chemicals, or reagents, needed for the test, specifically the ones used to extract the virus’s genetic material, or RNA.

A team of scientists at the University of Vermont, working in partnership with a group at the University of Washington, has developed a method of testing for the COVID-19 virus that doesn’t make use of these chemicals but still delivers an accurate result, paving the way for inexpensive, widely available testing in both developing countries and industrialized nations like the United States, where reagent supplies are again in short supply.

The method for the test, published Oct. 2 in PLOS Biology, omits the step in the widely used reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test where the scarce reagents are needed.

92% accuracy, missing only lowest viral loads

The accuracy of

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Business Insider’s top advertising and media stories for October 5

Hi! Welcome to the Insider Advertising daily for October 5. Lucia Moses here, filling in for Lauren Johnson.

Today’s news: Tech chiefs to testify, why Pepsi isn’t following Coke into hard seltzer, and Triller user numbers disputed.

First: remember to subscribe here to get this newsletter daily.


ted cruz jack dorsey twitter

Sen. Ted Cruz, left, and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey.

AP/Jacquelyn Martin; AP/Jose Luis Magana


The CEOs of Facebook, Google, and Twitter will all testify before Congress, days before the election, over legal protections for internet companies

Read the full story here.

pepsi pepsico



AP Photo/Paul Sakuma


PepsiCo’s CEO explains why it’s shying away from hard seltzer even as Coca-Cola moves into booze

Pepsi and Coke have been taking different paths when it comes to selling beverages to pandemic-weary consumers.

PepsiCo is focused “100%” on its strategy in energy drinks, CEO Ramon Laguarta said on the company’s earnings call Thursday in response to a question about

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Extinct megalodon confirmed as the biggest fish in the sea

megalodonillustration

This is an illustrated reconstruction of an adult megalodon.


Oliver E. Demuth

Of all the living fish in the sea, we know the whale shark to be the biggest. At up to eight or nine meters (roughly 28 feet), they eclipse all the other sharks alive in the ocean — and females reign supreme in the size stakes. But it certainly wasn’t always the case, as scientists have finally confirmed.

Published in Historical Biology, a study has confirmed that the now-extinct Otodus megalodon, or megatooth shark, once reached up to 15 meters (49 feet) in length — surpassing the present-day whale shark by almost seven meters (22 feet).

Generally portrayed as a gigantic monster of a shark in films like 2018’s The Meg, the real megalodon was a far cry from the 75

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Green Electricity Provider to Create 1,000 New Jobs in U.K.

(Bloomberg) — A U.K. clean energy company is seeking to create 1,000 jobs by the end of next year, expanding its technology to simplify the way consumers buy electricity.



a field of grass with trees in the background: Power lines run from Hinkley Point nuclear power stations, operated by Electricite de France SA's (EDF), near Bridgwater, U.K., on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016. After a decade of dealmaking and political brinkmanship, Electricite de France SA finally won the green light to build what will be the most expensive nuclear power station ever built, an 18 billion-pound ($24 billion) behemoth at Hinkley Point on England's west coast.


© Bloomberg
Power lines run from Hinkley Point nuclear power stations, operated by Electricite de France SA’s (EDF), near Bridgwater, U.K., on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016. After a decade of dealmaking and political brinkmanship, Electricite de France SA finally won the green light to build what will be the most expensive nuclear power station ever built, an 18 billion-pound ($24 billion) behemoth at Hinkley Point on England’s west coast.

Octopus Energy Ltd. said it wants to make the U.K. the “Silicon Valley of energy” and detailed a plan to expand its cloud-computing platform, known as Kraken, which aims to make it easier and cheaper for people to use renewable energy.

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The new jobs will go mainly to graduates and

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