Cocktail Chemistry: 10 Science-Backed Tips for the Perfect Drink

To the average cocktail lover, the action behind a bar counter can seem full of magic and mystery. There’s a quick sprig of this and a small splash of that, followed by loud, vigorous shaking or a few stirs, then out pours a perfectly formed beverage. At first sip you know: There’s no way you could make anything this good at home. 

Lately, with the weather getting cooler, and no end to this pandemic in sight, many of us are missing our neighborhood haunts. Though some bars are selling cocktails to go, many of us are on our own. If we want to drink a perfect Negroni this Halloween, we’ll have to make it ourselves.

Luckily, making cocktails isn’t magic, it’s science. A great bar is just a chemistry lab; each cocktail, a perfectly replicable concoction.

To help unravel the science of drinking, Discover talked with Kevin Liu, author of

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Polar ice, atmospheric water vapor biggest drivers of variation among climate models — ScienceDaily

A Florida State University researcher is part of a team that has found varying projections on global warming trends put forth by climate change scientists can be explained by differing models’ predictions regarding ice loss and atmospheric water vapor.

The work will help climate scientists reconcile various models to improve their accuracy, said Florida State University Meteorology Professor Ming Cai, one of the authors of the study published in Nature Communications .

Climate scientists agree that the Earth’s surface temperature is warming, but the details of exactly where and by how much are less clear. A worst-case climate change scenario (known as the “Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5”) predicted a likely increase in average global temperatures of about 2.6 degrees Celsius to 4.8 degrees Celsius (or about 4.7 degrees Fahrenheit to 8.6 degrees Fahrenheit) by 2100.

“This uncertainty limits our ability to foresee the severity of the global warming impacts on

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MetLife to Hold Conference Call for Third Quarter 2020 Results

MetLife, Inc. (NYSE: MET) today announced that it will hold its third quarter 2020 earnings conference call and audio webcast on Thursday, November 5, 2020 from 9-10 a.m. (ET). The call will follow MetLife’s issuance of its third quarter 2020 earnings news release and Third Quarter 2020 Financial Supplement on Wednesday, November 4, 2020, after the market closes. The news release and Third Quarter 2020 Financial Supplement will also be available on the MetLife Investor Relations web page (https://investor.metlife.com).

The conference call will be available live via telephone and the internet. To listen via telephone, dial 844-291-6362 (U.S.) or 234-720-6995 (outside the U.S.). The participant access code is 2510803. To listen to the conference call via the internet, visit www.metlife.com through a link on the Investor Relations page. Those who want to listen to the call via telephone or the internet should dial in or go to the website at

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Feisty Tasmanian Devils Roaming Australian Mainland Again After 3,000 Years

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Tasmanian devils, the carnivorous marsupials whose feisty, frenzied eating habits won the animals cartoon fame, have returned to mainland Australia for the first time in some 3,000 years.

“Seeing those devils released into a wild landscape — it’s a really emotional moment,” said Liz Gabriel, director of conservation group Aussie Ark, which led the release effort in partnership with other conservation groups.

The 11 most recently released devils began exploring their new home once they were freed from round, white cages at the nearly 1,000-acre Barrington Tops wildlife refuge in New South Wales state, about 190 kilometers (120 miles) north of Sydney.

Tasmanian devils, which were once called Sarcophilus satanicus or “Satanic flesh-lover,” went extinct in mainland Australia before the arrival of Europeans. Scientists believe the introduction of carnivorous dingoes, a surge in the indigenous human population, and a devastating dry season cause by a prolonged

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New technology may help detect COVID-19 in schools | Good News

Is the election hurting your mental health? An expert weighs in

Less than 30 days out from one of the most divisive elections in American history, stress and anxiety around politics is an an all-time high. Yahoo Life Mental Health Contributor, Jen Harstein, says that it’s important to become aware of how your mental health could be taking a toll this election season.

“Even for those of us who have been part of many elections and voted many different times, this is something none of us have ever experienced,” she says.

Hartstein says one of the most important things you can do is create set times during the day to unplug. “We live in a 24 hour news cycle, and the news is coming at us all the time, and it’s intense,” Hartstein explains. “That doesn’t do such great things for our body’s ability to calm down, reset and relax.”

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United, Cathay Pacific airlines launch trial of covid-19 test result app

Countries and companies are eager to make international travel easier and safer as the global pandemic grinds on. So this week, several airports are launching a trial run of an app that aims to give passengers an easy way to verify coronavirus lab results and vaccination records.

Called CommonPass, the app is being rolled out this month for some passengers flying to or from London, New York, Hong Kong and Singapore on Cathay Pacific Airways and United Airlines. The app is a product of the Commons Project Foundation and the World Economic Forum, according to a news release.

As part of the design, before boarding, passengers take a coronavirus test at a certified laboratory and upload their results to the app. Some countries will also require travelers to complete a health screening survey on the app to ensure they fit inbound

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PlayStation 5 uses liquid metal — here’s why that’s cool

PlayStation 5 is going to ship to consumers with liquid metal between its AMD system-on-a-chip and its heatsink. This is something that was unthinkable in previous consoles for a number of reasons. But Sony engineers have tackled the challenges, and this could enable the PS5 to expel heat much faster than its predecessors.

Heat management is a huge part of engineering any electronics system. And Sony obviously emphasized the importance of cooling during the PS5’s design phase. This might result in the PS5 running cooler and quieter. But more important, it should enable the system to run demanding games without crashing.

Let’s break down what this all means first.

PlayStation 5’s liquid metal is necessary due to extreme temperatures

Processors generate heat. That is an inevitable byproduct of the way they work. And modern CPUs and GPUs can produce a lot of heat without sacrificing stability and performance. But if

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Newly discovered dinosaur species had one less finger than its relatives

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Here’s a look at what the Oksoko avarsan dinosaurs might have looked like way back when.


Michael W. Skrepnick

Newly discovered fossils of a toothless, parrot-like dinosaur species that lived more than 68 million years ago show a creature with only two fingers on each forearm. That’s one less digit than its close dinosaur relatives had. 

The fossils imply that the dinosaurs may have evolved forelimb adaptations that enabled them to spread during the Late Cretaceous Period, researchers say in a new study published Wednesday in The Royal Society Open Science journal. Paleontologists from the University of Edinburgh found a number of complete skeletons of the new species during a dig in Mongolia’s Gobi Desert. 

The feathered, omnivorous Oksoko avarsan grew to around 6.5 feet (2 meters) long. In addition to two functional digits on

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Analysts Can’t Agree on What Prompted Big Spike in New Bitcoin Addresses

Bitcoin has seen a rapid rise in the creation of addresses on the blockchain so far this month, with one industry executive saying it’s likely due to traders moving funds off the legally troubled BitMEX exchange. Others point elsewhere.

  • The “entities net growth” metric from analytics firm Glassnode, which measures the daily change in unique entities or clusters of addresses controlled by a single participant, rose sharply by 244% from 9,750 to 33,620 in the first six days of October.
  • Tuesday’s tally of 33,620 was the highest since Oct. 3, 2018.
  • The surge in new entities noticeably picked up the pace in the wake of U.S. authorities’ recent decision to bring civil and criminal charges against cryptocurrency derivatives trading platform BitMEX and users’ resulting panicked migration of funds to other exchanges.
  • BitMEX has witnessed an outflow of at least 40,000 BTC (worth around $424 million at press time) since the
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Nvidia Promises The Pervasiveness Of AI And A New Data Center Architecture

Just after coming off two major industry announcements – the introduction of the highest performing consumer graphic cards and the proposed acquisition of Arm – Nvidia launched its largest virtual Graphics Technology Conference (GTC) on October 5, 2020. Unlike the spring 2020 GTC, which was changed to a virtual conference at the last moment due to COVID-19, this one resembled a more traditional GTC with the kickoff by CEO Jenson Huang revealing a flurry of product and technology announcements. Dressed in his trademark leather jacket and standing in the middle of his kitchen (again), Mr. Huang provided a glimpse into Nvidia’s new solutions for the data center, edge AI, healthcare, and a new suite of collaborative tools.

There were two key areas of focus for this GTC – the growing pervasiveness of AI and a proposed change

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