Geologists solve puzzle that could predict valuable rare earth element deposits — ScienceDaily

Pioneering new research has helped geologists solve a long-standing puzzle that could help pinpoint new, untapped concentrations of some the most valuable rare earth deposits.

A team of geologists, led by Professor Frances Wall from the Camborne School of Mines, have discovered a new hypothesis to predict where rare earth elements neodymium and dysprosium could be found.

The elements are among the most sought after, because they are an essential part of digital and clean energy manufacturing, including magnets in large wind turbines and electric cars motors.

For the new research, scientists conducted a series of experiments that showed sodium and potassium — rather than chlorine or fluorine as previously thought — were the key ingredients for making these rare earth elements soluble.

This is crucial as it determines whether they crystalise — making them fit for extraction — or stayed dissolved in fluids.

The experiments could therefore allow geologists

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U.S. Rep. Ken Buck Calls for ‘More Enforcement and Less Regulation’ of Big Tech on Cheddar

With big tech under a microscope in Washington, Democrats and Republicans agree that laws need to be modernized in order to promote fair competition, particularly for small businesses that tend to get snuffed out by the giants, Rep. Ken Buck (R-Colo. 4th District), told Cheddar.

Members of both parties have released reports that look to establish pathways to breaking up tech giants, which they consider monopolies, and level the playing field in online marketplaces.

According to Buck, who wrote one of those reports, the issue becomes partisan when deciding how to regulate the big tech industry, an issue he said would be uncertain under a Joe Biden- Kamala Harris administration.

“The Trump administration has been fairly aggressive in this area and partly because conservatives believe that Google and Facebook and Twitter are biased against conservative views and have suppressed conservative views…,” Buck said.

Also, Senator Harris comes from the Bay
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Apple Starts Shipping Devices From Stores to Speed Up Deliveries

Shoppers stand in line to enter the Apple store at the Queens Center shopping mall in Queens, New York.

Photographer: Peter Foley/Bloomberg

Apple Inc. is starting to use its network of retail stores as distribution centers for shipping products to consumers, joining a trend popularized by other retailers.

The Cupertino, California-based technology giant has typically shipped devices like iPhones, Macs, iPads, and accessories from warehouses located across a customer’s region or directly from China. Now items that are in stock can be shipped directly to consumers from a network of almost 300 retail stores spread across the U.S. and Canada, according to people familiar with the matter.

Apple told staff the shift will mean faster delivery times for customers who live further from distribution centers than from stores, according to the people who asked not to be identified discussing internal policies. The products will be shipped through

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COSI plans a free science activity giveaway in Dayton

COSI is heading to Dayton on its Back-To-School Statewide Roadshow.

Families will be able to drive through and pick up a free COSI Learning Lunchbox on Wednesday, Oct. 14 from 4 p.m. — 6 p.m. at the Dayton Southwest Library Branch, 21 Watervliet Ave.

The Learning Lunchbox is filled with five science activities and will be available while supplies last. After supplies are depleted, COSI will distribute a free COSI Science Snack while supplies last, a box featuring one science activity to do at home.

The Center of Science and Industry (COSI), the top-ranked science center in the country by USA Today, the Boonshoft Museum of Discovery, the Dayton Metro Library, the Ohio Mayors Alliance, and Mayors’ Partnership for Progress have joined forces to help make science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) educational programming more accessible to Ohio communities, according to a release.

As distance learning needs increase across the

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OPPO Patents Smartphone With Waterfall Display & Under-Display Camera

After patenting several foldable smartphone designs over the last few months, OPPO is back with an innovative design for traditional candy bar-style smartphones. The latest OPPO patent approved by CNIPA (China National Intellectual Property Administration) reveals the smartphone with a waterfall display and an under-display selfie camera.

While the company filed for the patent in November last year, it only got approved earlier today. The documentation includes a total of four design iterations with a few minor changes.

Latest OPPO patent showcases smartphone with waterfall display

These days, curved edge displays are common to find on flagship smartphones. OPPO’s patented design takes the display curvature to an extreme level. That said, it already showcased a similar-looking smartphone in July last year.

Brian Shen, OPPO’s VP, shared images of the prototype device featuring a waterfall display with 88-degree curved edges. The company never again talked about that device. With this newly

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Without nuclear power, the world’s climate challenge will get a whole lot harder

The Covid-19 crisis not only delivered an unprecedented shock to the world economy. It also underscored the scale of the climate challenge we face: Even in the current deep recession, global carbon emissions remain unsustainable.



a sunset in the background: White steam billows from the Cattenom nuclear power plant, at sunset in Cattenom, eastern France, on June 2, 2020. - Cattenom is the ninth largest nuclear power station in the world. (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA / AFP) (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA/AFP via Getty Images)


© Sebastien Berda/AFP/Getty Images
White steam billows from the Cattenom nuclear power plant, at sunset in Cattenom, eastern France, on June 2, 2020. – Cattenom is the ninth largest nuclear power station in the world. (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA / AFP) (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA/AFP via Getty Images)

If the world is to meet energy security and climate goals, clean energy must be at the core of post-Covid-19 economic recovery efforts. Strong growth in wind and solar energy and in the use of electric cars gives us grounds for hope, as does the promise of emerging technologies like hydrogen and carbon capture. But the scale of the challenge means we cannot afford to exclude any

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What Trump’s COVID diagnosis might mean for the 25th Amendment

The news that President Donald Trump tested positive for COVID-19 has thrown a monkey wrench into an already fraught election season. It’s raised questions about who would lead the country if the president were to become gravely ill, and when that might be determined. 



Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on October 9, 2020 to introduce legislation based on the 25th Amendment that would create a Commission on Presidential Capacity that would review a president's fitness for office. Drew Angerer/Getty Images


© Provided by CNET
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on October 9, 2020 to introduce legislation based on the 25th Amendment that would create a Commission on Presidential Capacity that would review a president’s fitness for office. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Now there are new questions about who should be able to make the decision of when a president can’t fulfill his duties. On Friday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi introduced legislation that would allow Congress, using the 25th Amendment to the Constitution, to take power away from a president if he were to become incapacitated. But

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PS5’s Game Boost Backwards Compatibility Feature Improves Certain PS4 Games

The PS5 launches around the world in a little over month, and while there are still many lingering questions about how the system works, Sony has now shared some more details about PS5’s backwards compatibility. As with Xbox Series X, it appears some previous-gen games will get a performance boost when played on PS5 thanks to the console’s Game Boost feature.

As detailed on the PlayStation support website, Game Boost allows certain PS4 titles to “run with a higher or smoother frame rate” when played on a PS5. However, Sony notes that this will only apply to “select” games; it appears the performance boost won’t be applied across the board, as Xbox Series X does with Xbox One games.

Although Sony did not yet specify what games are able to take advantage of Game Boost, the company shed a bit more light on how it will work in a PlayStation

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Q3 PC shipments hit fastest growth in a decade

A customer looks at Dell computers at a Best Buy store in Orem, Utah.

George Frey | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Computer makers shipped 79.2 million PCs in the third quarter, up 12.7% year over year, showing the fastest growth in a decade, technology research company Canalys estimated on Friday.

Despite the swelling popularity of phones and tablets in recent years, people have been leaning harder on personal computers while working or studying from home in the past several months because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Acer of Taiwan was the biggest individual beneficiary from the trend in the third quarter, shipping 5.6 million PCs, up 15%, according to the Canalys estimates, which include Chromebooks that run Google-led Chrome OS. The company said Lenovo, the largest PC maker by shipments in the quarter, shipped 19.3 million PCs, up 11.4%.

Microsoft, whose Windows 10 operating system runs on over 1 billion devices,

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AI Created a Detailed 3D Map of Stars, Galaxies, and Quasars

Pan-STARRS telescope in Hawai’i

Pan-STARRS telescope in Hawai’i
Image: University of Hawai’i

A team of astronomers from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s Institute for Astronomy (IfA) has produced the most comprehensive astronomical imaging catalog of stars, galaxies, and quasars ever created with help from an artificially intelligent neural network.

The group of astronomers from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa’s Institute for Astronomy (IfA) released a catalog containing 3 billion celestial objects in 2016, including stars, galaxies, and quasars (the active cores of supermassive black holes). Needless to say, the parsing of this extensive database—packed with 2 petabytes of data—was a task unfit for puny humans, and even grad students. A major goal coming out of the 2016 catalog release was to better characterize these distant specks of light, and to also map the arrangement of galaxies in all three dimensions. The Pan-STARRS team can now check these items off their

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