Geek of the Week: Artist Chanee Choi’s 3D video game ‘Pandemic’ looks at racism during COVID-19

Chanee Choi performs in another of her works, called “Polaris,” a multimedia installation and performance. (Photo courtesy of Chanee Choi)

Chanee Choi’s “Pandemic” is a video game and it is art. And the “art game” is not an escape from reality as we know it right now.

A Ph.D. candidate in art and technology in the University of Washington’s Digital Arts and Experimental Media (DXARTS) department, Choi is a multidisciplinary interactive artist. Her latest project is a first-person 3D video game in which the player is the coronavirus, moving through a virtual environment.

Chanee Choi.

Our latest Geek of the Week, who is originally from South Korea, took on “Pandemic” to bring awareness to incidents of discrimination, xenophobia, racism, and violence against Asian Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic. She hopes her game conveys a sense of what it’s like to be a minority in America.

“I think games are capable

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Try Nikon’s full-frame Z5 mirrorless camera for free for 30 days

nikon-z5

Nikon

It’s no secret that smartphones have had a serious impact on digital camera sales in recent years; fewer people feel the same imperative to own compact cameras and digital SLRs as they once did. So camera makers are looking for ways to entice you to jump back into the deep end of the photography pool. Earlier this year Nikon unveiled its Z5, a great-looking entry-level full-frame mirrorless camera at a pretty attractive price. But how to get you to buy one? How about if you could try it risk-free for a month? Done and done. For a limited time, if you buy a Nikon Z5, you can try it at home for 30 days essentially for free — because if you aren’t happy with it, you can return it for a full refund.

This is all part of Nikon’s Yellow Program, designed to let you get enough hands-on time

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Long-legged ‘stilt mice’ wade into streams to hunt aquatic insects using their whiskers — ScienceDaily

Ninety-three years ago, a scientist trapped a mouse in a stream in Ethiopia. Of all the mice, rats, and gerbils in Africa, it stood out as the one most adapted for living in water, with water-resistant fur and long, broad feet. That specimen, housed at Chicago’s Field Museum, is the only one of its genus ever collected, and scientists think it may now be extinct. But in a new study in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, researchers have verified this semi-aquatic mouse’s closest cousins, including two species new to science.

“These two groups of mice have been confused with one another for a century,” says Julian Kerbis Peterhans, one of the paper’s authors and a researcher at the Field Museum who’s studied these rodents for over 30 years. “They’ve been so elusive for so long, they’re some of the rarest animals in the world, so it’s exciting

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Night Market Hires Innovative Industry Leader Kimberly Chulis to Critical Role of VP of Data Science

NEW YORK, Oct. 09, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Night Market, Horizon’s recently launched eCommerce data intelligence company, today announced it has hired Kimberly Chulis, Ph.D., as VP of Data Science. The move is effective immediately and Chulis will report directly to Randy Browning, President of Night Market.

Night Market is designed to provide brands with unique insights into consumer purchase behaviour within the walled gardens of Amazon, Google and Facebook, thus giving brands unprecedented control of the consumer e-purchase journey. The role of VP of Data Science represents a significant hire as Night Market continues to bring together performance media and retail expertise to provide brands with a more sophisticated approach to maximizing their revenue potential.

Chulis is a 20-year data science veteran known for her innovative work in advanced analytics, predictive modeling and cloud-based ML and AI solutions for major technology companies such as Microsoft and IBM. At Night

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Yelp rolls out new tactic to warn consumers about businesses accused of ‘overtly racist actions’

Yelp has a zero tolerance policy for racism.

The company, which publishes and aggregates crowd-sourced business reviews, announced Thursday it will be placing a new “Business Accused of Racist Behavior Alert” on Yelp pages to warn users about businesses that have been said to display “overtly racist actions.” They will also include a direct link to a news article for consumers to learn more about the reported incident.

SUPPORT BLACK BUSINESSES: These black-owned Houston restaurants need your support during the COVID-19 crisis

“We know these values are important to our users and now more than ever, consumers are increasingly conscious of the types of businesses they patronize and support,” Noorie Malik, vice president of user operations, wrote in a blog post. “In fact, we’ve seen that reviews mentioning Black-owned businesses were up more than 617% this summer compared to last summer. Support for women-owned businesses has also increased, with review

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Bits of Venus may be lurking on the moon, scientists suggest

Does Venus host alien life? That’s the big question after a recent study spotted phosphine — a gas with possible biological origins — in the planet’s clouds. We won’t have answers until further investigation, but clues to the planet’s history of habitability could be closer than expected.



NASA created this computer-simulated global view of Venus' northern hemisphere. NASA/JPL


© Provided by CNET
NASA created this computer-simulated global view of Venus’ northern hemisphere. NASA/JPL

Yale University astronomers Samuel Cabot and Gregory Laughlin said we should look to the moon for a peek into Venus’ past. They explained why in a paper accepted into the Planetary Science Journal this month.

The study suggests “asteroids and comets slamming into Venus may have dislodged as many as 10 billion rocks and sent them into an orbit that intersected with Earth and Earth’s moon,” Yale said in a statement. These impacts were more common billions of years ago, meaning bits of ancient Venus could remain

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Apple Special Event 2020: Should You Really Buy the New 5G iPhone?

Welcome to church.

Photographer: Bloomberg/Bloomberg

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Today’s Agenda

Five Gs? In This Economy?

Of America’s many religious holidays, few generate as much fervor as New iPhone Day, the annual Special Event when Apple unveils the latest iteration of a thing millions of us now can’t live without. (Full disclosure: I’m typing this on a MacBook, in arm’s reach of an iPhone, an iPad, a set of AirPods and various dongles needed to charge and connect all this junk.) 

The holiday is a bit weird this year, though. For starters, the coronavirus bumped the

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Beat Future Infectious Diseases by Crowdsourcing Strategic Data

By Rich Murr, CIO, Epicor Software

To blunt the impact of COVID-19, a vast number of medical, industrial, and financial resources are being deployed. And while these efforts are important, we should also look ahead so that we are better able to prevent future pandemics by crowdsourcing strategic, available data that would offer a bigger picture.

As someone who previously served in the United States Marines and who now serves as a CIO for a software company, I can emphatically say that regardless of your line of work, one of the best first lines of defense is information – specifically, quality information that can be speedily obtained and assessed. In the case of fighting infectious diseases, this information is critical for our epidemiologists. They need information so that we can combat potential threats before they become widespread.

It’s clear that relying solely on closed societies, public health institutions, or the

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As Trump hails Regeneron’s COVID-19 treatment, his administration tries to block the science it used

By Maggie Fox | CNN

President Donald Trump has been celebrating the dose of experimental monoclonal antibodies he was given last Friday, saying he thinks it helped him vanquish his coronavirus infection in record time.

“It was incredible the impact it had,” he said in a video he tweeted Thursday.

What he didn’t say is that the treatment was developed using technology his administration has worked for four years to ban.

It has to do with abortion politics, and the science of using human tissue to test and to make medicines. Regeneron’s therapy indirectly relied on tissue taken from an abortion.

Trump’s base, of course, is strongly against abortion rights and his administration acted quickly to reverse many Obama era policies — including policies that moved forward scientific research involving human fetal tissue.

Especially involved are human embryonic stem cells, made using days-old embryos, usually taken from fertility clinics. They’re

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Huawei’s Rivals Are Already Filling A $27 Billion Hole Left By US Sanctions

After more US sanctions have all-but-crippled the future of Huawei’s global networks business — and its efforts to become the dominant 5G provider — dollar signs are already materializing for its rivals.

At the crux of Huawei’s withdrawal is an annual $27 billion opportunity for its competitors — including Nokia, Ericsson and Samsung — to become the go-to providers of 5G and other telecommunication services to domestic carriers, says Ryan Koontz, an analyst at Rosenblatt Securities. “It’s a massive economic transition,” says Koontz. “It’s relatively urgent for these carriers to make the change.” 

The multi-billion dollar market opportunity, which hinges on Huawei’s sales figures for the year ended September, will not evaporate overnight, Koontz says, but will likely be absorbed over the next three to four years. 

Because

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