Using a UV Camera to Reveal Hidden Ultraviolet Patterns Humans Can’t See

Photographer and “mad scientist” Don Komarechka is back for a DPReview TV episode on ultraviolet light. Specifically, he explains how a modified camera-and-filter combination can reveal hidden ultraviolet patterns that are invisible to the human eye, but crucial for pollinators like bees.

Human trichromatic vision is limited to the so-called “visible” portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, but the spectrum doesn’t simply stop at those boundaries. Immediately adjacent to the visible light spectrum is near-infrared and infrared on one end, and ultraviolet on the other, both of which can be captured using specially-modified cameras.

We’ve featured infrared photography many times before, but in this video, Komarechka heads over to the other end to reveal the hidden world of ultraviolet light. Specifically, he shows you the hidden patterns that pollinators like bees use to home in on certain flowers. The results can be downright shocking:

From streaks leading to the pollen source,

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Earth cannot be squeezed ‘like an orange’

VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis on Saturday issued an urgent call to action to defend the planet and help the poor in his second TED talk.



FILE -- In this Sept. 20, 2020 file photo, Pope Francis delivers his blessing as he recites the Angelus noon prayer from the window of his studio overlooking St.Peter's Square, at the Vatican. The pontiff on Saturday, Oct. 10 recorded a video message to a TED conference on climate change, that will be released later Saturday night. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE — In this Sept. 20, 2020 file photo, Pope Francis delivers his blessing as he recites the Angelus noon prayer from the window of his studio overlooking St.Peter’s Square, at the Vatican. The pontiff on Saturday, Oct. 10 recorded a video message to a TED conference on climate change, that will be released later Saturday night. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

The pontiff, known for his affinity for social media and technology, said in a videotaped message to a TED conference on climate change that the coronavirus pandemic had put a focus on the social-environmental challenge facing the globe.

“Science tells us, every day with more precision, that it is necessary to act with urgency — I am not

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NMSU’s Physical Science Lab partners with USDA for workshop series

Marcella Shelby, New Mexico State University
Published 2:36 p.m. MT Oct. 10, 2020

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LAS CRUCES – Small unmanned aircraft system virtual workshops were held by staff from New Mexico State University’s Physical Science Laboratory in collaboration with the USDA Agricultural Research Service Scientific Computing Program Sept. 30 and Oct. 7. Scientists want to expand research opportunities, and sUAS are a way of collecting more and new data. The PSL team was asked by the USDA ARS to help guide new potential sUAS users on the best practice approaches to safely and effectively using this technology for research.

When registration for the two workshops

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4 Essential Tasks New Bootstrapped Businesses Should Outsource


5 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


When you’re bootstrapping your startup, it can be tempting to try to do everything yourself in an attempt to save money. After all, when you don’t have VC backing on your side, you have to stretch every dollar!

However, a do-it-all mentality could ultimately backfire in the long run. If you want to make the most of your financial resources and achieve the growth that will take your startup to the next level, you’re going to have to outsource.

No matter what industry you’re working in, each startup will have essential, time-consuming tasks that can easily take your attention away from the big-picture issues that affect your company’s long-term health. Ignoring these “everyday” tasks will limit your growth — but so will spending too much of your own time on them.

The solution, of course, is

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“We must act now” on climate

“Science tells us, every day with more precision, that urgent action is needed—and I am not dramatizing, this is what science says—if we are to keep the hope of avoiding radical and catastrophic climate change,” he told an audience today at the launch event for TED Countdown, a new global initiative to accelerate climate action. “And for this, we must act now. This is a scientific fact.”

The pope, who recently published a new encyclical arguing for social unity, believes that we need to start with education about environmental problems based on science. We need to ensure that everyone has access to clean water and sustainably produced food. And we need to transition to clean, renewable energy, with a focus on meeting the needs of the poor and people who have to move to new jobs in the energy sector.

Businesses also need to consider their impact on both the

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Argentina Expands Tech Companies’ Incentives Amid Recovery Push

Argentina Bonds Fall With Tighter Foreign-Exchange Controls

Photographer: Erica Canepa/Bloomberg

Argentina is expanding benefits to its burgeoning tech sector in an effort to boost much-needed foreign investment and exports, supporting a resilient industry that’s grown amid a severe, three-year recession.

Both chambers of congress recently approved a technology bill that provides tax incentives for the next decade to start-ups and industry giants that train and hire workers. It’s one of very few bills with long-term economic scope to make it through Argentina’s deeply divided congress this year.

“There’s absolute agreement among all political parties about the relevance of this sector,” Production Minister Matias Kulfas told journalists Friday, estimating the bill over 10 years would nearly double employment and increase tech service exports by an additional $4 billion. “The pandemic is speeding up digital priorities, and we have to see it as an opportunity to strengthen foreign investment.”

Tough Tech

Argentina’s tech sector has

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PlayStation Creator Is Now Doing Something Completely Different

The creator of the original PlayStation console is back to make new machines, though they probably aren’t what you’d expect. Ken Kutaragi has moved from video games to robots, and he aims to help human workers with factory jobs.

Speaking to Bloomberg, Kutaragi explained that as CEO of Ascent Robotics, a company founded in 2016, he is not receiving a salary and wants to solve problems caused by the pandemic.

“The COVID-19 outbreak has turned the old argument about robots taking our jobs on its head,” he said. “It’s pretty clear now that if we want to arrive at a new normal, we need more and more robots in our daily lives.”

Increased automation has certainly been a concern across numerous industries, with machines taking the place of cashiers, assembly workers, and even cooks. With the pandemic putting peoples’ lives at risk, however, at least a temporary increase in automation

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Live NCAA Watch IN TV & Update

sdsa BBC News Time Full 4k Online Free Watch Army vs The Citadel Live Online Football 2020 Free .Each Friday, the Sports Illustrated-AllGators staff will provide predictions and pre-game analysis before the Florida Gators take on their weekly opponent..dasdsad

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da asThis week, Florida heads to College Station, Texas this week for its first ranked ads sadmatchup of the season. The No. 4 Gators will take on the No. 21 Texas A&M Aggies on Saturday at noon, on ESPN. Despite being the toughest opponent of the year thus s dasd far, and going on the road, our staff is once again confident that

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Joni Ernst, Theresa Greenfield battle for seat

Democratic senate candidate Theresa Greenfield (L) and Senator Joni Ernst, R-IA (R).

Caroline Brehman | CQ-Roll Call, Inc. | Getty Images

Republican Joni Ernst minced no words in her first televised ad of her successful Senate bid in 2014.

“I grew up castrating hogs on an Iowa farm. So when I get to Washington, I’ll know how to cut pork,” the then-state senator says in the ad before the camera cuts to footage of pigs. “Washington’s full of big spenders. Let’s make ’em squeal.”

When Iowa voters cast their ballots in 2020, they’ll decide whether Ernst has lived up to that promise during her six years in Washington.

Ernst has become a reliable Republican vote in the Senate, voting against her party only 3.4% of the time in the current legislative session, according to data compiled by ProPublica. The average Senate Republican voted against the party 4.3% of the time

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Scientists find upper limit for the speed of sound — ScienceDaily

A research collaboration between Queen Mary University of London, the University of Cambridge and the Institute for High Pressure Physics in Troitsk has discovered the fastest possible speed of sound.

The result- about 36 km per second — is around twice as fast as the speed of sound in diamond, the hardest known material in the world.

Waves, such as sound or light waves, are disturbances that move energy from one place to another. Sound waves can travel through different mediums, such as air or water, and move at different speeds depending on what they’re travelling through. For example, they move through solids much faster than they would through liquids or gases, which is why you’re able to hear an approaching train much faster if you listen to the sound propagating in the rail track rather than through the air.

Einstein’s theory of special relativity sets the absolute speed limit

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