AB Science announces that results from masitinib study AB07015 in severe asthma have been …

Paris, 13 October 2020, 6pm

Results from masitinib study AB07015 in severe asthma selected for presentation at an American Thoracic Society (ATS) symposium held on 16th October, 2020

AB Science SA (Euronext – FR0010557264 – AB) today announced that results from masitinib study AB07015 in severe asthma have been selected for presentation at an upcoming American Thoracic Society (ATS) symposium.

The ATS Allergy, Immunology, and Inflammation Assembly will host a virtual symposium on October 16, 2020 at 10 am (Eastern Standard Time). This is a chaired virtual meeting during which selected abstracts from the ATS 2020 International Conference (ATS 2020 Virtual) are presented live with questions from moderators and audience.  

Pascal Chanez, Professor of Respiratory Diseases at Aix-Marseille University, France, will present the results of masitinib as a treatment of severe corticosteroid-dependent asthma.

Details for the presentation are as follows:

Session Title:                  Late Breaking Clinical Trials in Airway Diseases
Date

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RUDN University mathematician refined the model of predator-prey relations in the wild

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IMAGE: The traditional mathematical model of predator-prey relations in the wild does not take into account indirect nonlocal interactions. However, according to a mathematician from RUDN University, they affect the dynamics…
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Credit: RUDN University

The traditional mathematical model of predator-prey relations in the wild does not take into account indirect nonlocal interactions. However, according to a mathematician from RUDN University, they affect the dynamics of predators and prey in a system, and the nature of this effect is sensitive to the initial conditions. An article about his work was published in the Communications in Nonlinear Science and Numerical Simulation journal.

Ecologists use mathematical models of ecosystems to understand their structure and predict their development. Predator-prey is one of the basic models of this kind. With its help scientists can for instance calculate changes in the numbers of carnivores and herbivores depending on numerous conditions: the breeding of the

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Mathematician refines model of predator-prey relations in the wild

RUDN University mathematician refined the model of predator-prey relations in the wild
The traditional mathematical model of predator-prey relations in the wild does not take into account indirect nonlocal interactions. However, according to a mathematician from RUDN University, they affect the dynamics of predators and prey in a system, and the nature of this effect is sensitive to the initial conditions. Credit: RUDN University

The traditional mathematical model of predator-prey relations in the wild does not take into account indirect nonlocal interactions. However, according to a mathematician from RUDN University, they affect the dynamics of predators and prey in a system, and the nature of this effect is sensitive to the initial conditions. An article about his work was published in the Communications in Nonlinear Science and Numerical Simulation journal.


Ecologists use mathematical models of ecosystems to understand their structure and predict their development. Predator-prey is one of the basic models of this kind. With its help scientists can for instance calculate

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COVID-19 can survive on phone screens for 28 days in the dark, study suggests



a hand holding a cell phone: Crystal Cox/Business Insider


© Crystal Cox/Business Insider
Crystal Cox/Business Insider

  • Research from Australia’s national science agency suggests that the COVID-19 virus can survive on smooth surfaces for 28 days at room temperature.
  • The study tested the virus on glass mobile phone screens, plastic and paper banknotes, and stainless steel.
  • Researchers kept these surfaces in the dark during the study. UV light has been shown to kill COVID-19.
  • Previous studies have suggested the virus lingers on these surfaces for seven days or less.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The COVID-19 virus can survive on phone screens for 28 days under laboratory conditions, longer than previously thought, new research from the Australian government’s science agency has found. 

Researchers tested the virus on smooth surfaces such as glass phone screens and paper banknotes. They kept them in the dark at room temperature, around 20 degrees Celsius (68 degrees Fahrenheit).

They found the virus could

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Johnson has ignored the science and blown our chance to stop a second wave

We shouldn’t be here. Back in June, England had the opportunity to suppress the virus. With a functional test and trace system, support to help people self-isolate, a robust set of regulations to keep work and leisure spaces safe and a clear public communications campaign, we could have suppressed coronavirus into the winter.



Boris Johnson in a suit and tie: Photograph: Toby Melville/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Toby Melville/AFP/Getty Images

But the opportunity was squandered. Worse, as restrictions were lifted on 4 July – what became known colloquially as “Freedom Saturday” – we were encouraged to relax, to travel back to work, to go to the pub, to mix and mingle. Meanwhile, the country’s dysfunctional, centralised and privately-run test and trace system lurched from one calamity to the next. World class? At failing to contact people and succeeding in losing data, perhaps.

The virus never went away. In some deprived communities, such as Bolton and Rochdale, infections remained

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3M Survey Reports Decline In Science Skepticism For First Time In 3 Years

Since 2018, 3M has launched an annual State of Science Index to track public attitudes towards science across the world. But for 2020, the company conducted two surveys, a Pre-Pandemic Wave and a Pandemic Pulse Wave survey, finding that science skepticism has declined for the first time in three years, and that there is an increased public understanding of the importance of science in our daily lives.

In the Pre-Pandemic Wave survey, representative samples of 1,000 adults (aged 18+) in 18 countries, including China, Mexico and the US, were asked to complete a 15-20 minute long survey to assess their attitude towards science. Among the pre-pandemic survey findings, there was a rise in science skepticism to 35%, from an original 29% in 2018.

“As the pandemic sort of

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What’s the best way to get out the vote in a pandemic?

<span class="caption">Virtual neighborhood meetings, like this Democratic effort in Reedsburg, Wis., are among the latest efforts to get people to vote.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://newsroom.ap.org/detail/Election2020GroundGame/1ea10d7a31db4be3a7353a3d5df3beb7/photo" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:AP Photo/Tom Beaumont">AP Photo/Tom Beaumont</a></span>
Virtual neighborhood meetings, like this Democratic effort in Reedsburg, Wis., are among the latest efforts to get people to vote. AP Photo/Tom Beaumont

Identifying supporters and getting them to the polls are key parts of any political campaign. The pandemic, however, creates new challenges for candidates trying to convey their messages and mobilize voters.

Decades of political science research have made clear that mobilizing in person, either on the doorstep or on the phone, is the most effective way of moving voters to the polls. A well-run door-to-door campaign can be expected to increase turnout by 7 to 9 percentage points; an effective phone campaign can be expected to lead to a 3% to 5% increase in voter turnout.

However, even before the pandemic, it was getting harder and harder to reach voters in person or on the phone. When I began studying voter mobilization in 2005, it was common

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Assaults on science causing alarming and avoidable deaths in the U.S.

politician
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

COVID-19 is now the third leading cause of death in the United States only behind cardiovascular disease and cancer. The U.S. accounts for more than 20 percent of COVID-19 cases (more than 7.7 million) and deaths (more than 210,000) in the world today while comprising 4.25 percent of the global population.


In a commentary published online in EClinicalMedicine, researchers from Florida Atlantic University’s Schmidt College of Medicine and collaborators state that “pandemic politics” is causing assaults on science, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as well as the health of the public.

As an example, the authors point out that the FDA, a world renowned regulatory authority issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for hydroxychloroquine in the absence of any reliable data from large-scale randomized trials, all of which later showed no benefit and some

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This Is the Healthiest Possible Diet, According to Research

If you’re an entrepreneur who wants to maximize your energy and avoid an early death by eating healthy, there is a lot of confusing advice out there to contend with. Besides a host of trendy but conflicting diets, guidelines from actual scientists change regularly. 

One year fat will kill you, the next sugar is public enemy number one. Is fish great for you or mercury-laced poison? And while everyone agrees heavy drinking is unhealthy, does a glass or two of wine a day do good or bad things for your health? 

Given the ever-changing answers to questions like these, it’s tempting to throw up your hands and ignore everything but the most basic nutrition advice. If no one knows anything beyond fast food is bad, then you may as well let your instincts (and taste buds) guide you. 

But according to a research review published recently in the Journal of

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The Mystery And Science Behind The Law Of Attraction

Transformational coach leveraging science & ancient wisdom to help people manifest their greatness. Blue Dot Transform Consulting

I fondly remember my graduation day, which was on the 25th of April. The master of ceremonies was going to announce the name of the student who bagged the title of best all-rounder for the postgraduate class of 2010. The award also entailed a cash prize worth $1,500.

I was hopeful of winning the title as I had worked tirelessly and visualized the entire scenario several times. “Mental rehearsal,” as scientists call it, is something that performers do quite often before a performance. Here, I was not going to perform something, but I was strongly intending to create an event that my mind had conceived. 

Lo and behold, my crazy thought manifested. As I went up to the stage and received the award, I was reliving each and every moment that I

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